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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Pegasos||View Options:  |  |  |   

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 152 - 151 B.C., New Style Silver Tetradrachm

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This issue introduced the letter on the amphora, which that may indicate the month of production. Only one example listed in Thompson with this obverse die had a legible letter on the amphora, the letter M.
SH26466. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson Athens 83; cf. Svoronos Athens pl. 35, 19; BMC -; SNG Cop -; SNG Britain -, SNG Delepierre -; Weber -; SNG ANS -, VF, flat areas, weight 16.431 g, maximum diameter 33.4 mm, die axis 0o, early period; obverse head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing crested helmet ornamented with Pegasos; reverse A−ΘE, owl stands right on amphora, XM monogram left, AΦN monogram over two snakes right, Λ on amphora, all within olive wreath; nice style; rare; SOLD


Lampsacus, Mysia, 280 - 275 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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This coin was struck during a chaotic time when the Greece and Anatolia were the battlegrounds of Alexander's successors. The old men, once comrades in Alexander's army, along with their children, fought each other to death to expand their kingdoms. Cities, such as Lampsacus, in territory that might change hands after the next battle, struck coins in the types and name of Alexander, perhaps as much to maintain neutrality and some continuity, as to honor the deified king.
SH68277. Silver tetradrachm, Unpublished in standard references, NYINC Auction (6 Jan 2012), lot 153 (the only other example known to Forum); cf. Price 1456 (torch under throne), VF, attractive style, well struck, weight 16.843 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 0o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 280 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, ong scepter vertical behind in left hand, in left field: ΩΣ monogram above Pegasos forepart left above race torch; extremely rare; SOLD


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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As reported by B.V. Head in Chapter 5 of Excavations at Ephesus: The Archaic Artemisia, a coin of this type was one of five coins found in excavations underneath the foundations of the southern wall of the B cella of the Artemisia at Ephesus. The other four coins were lion head and lion paw types. Head wrote these coins must have been deposited during construction of the First Temple (A). Weidauer 145 is the coin found at the Artemisia (= Head Artemisia 79), now at the Arkeoloji Müzesi, Istanbul. The Weidauer coins appear to be struck with the same obverse die.
SH84450. Electrum 1/24 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 145 - 146; Head Artemisia p. 86 and pl. 2, 79; cf. SNGvA 1781 (different style); Rosen 287 (same); SNG Kayhan 717 (same), gVF, centered, edge cracks, some die rust (also found on other examples of this type), weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 6.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse bridled head and neck of Pegasos left, with top edge of wing visible; reverse four raised squares in a cross pattern within incuse square punch; very rare; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 345 - 307 B.C.

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Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, strategic warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill. She was believed to lead soldiers into battle as the war goddess Athena Promachos. The Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis was dedicated to her, along with numerous other temples and monuments across Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
SH26890. Silver stater, Pegasi I 427, Ravel 1009, gVF, weight 8.512 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 270o, Corinth mint, c. 375 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse laureate and helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, aegis behind, A-P below; SOLD


Lokroi Epizephyrioi, Bruttium, Italy, c. 317 - 310 B.C.

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Locris, which Plato called "the flower of Italy," was located on the Italian shore of the Ionian Sea. The city allied with Sparta early but later with Syracuse. During the Pyrrhic Wars, Locris hosted a Roman garrison but changed sides several times. Bronze tablets from its temple to Zeus record payments to a 'king,' thought to be Pyrrhus. Despite this, Pyrrhus plundered their temple of Persephone before his return to Epirus. At the end of the war, perhaps to allay fears about its loyalty, Locris struck coins depicting Pistis, goddess good faith and loyalty, crowning Roma.
SH62325. Silver stater, Calciati II 13; Pozzi 1731; BMC Corinth p. 95, 9-12; SNG München 1491; SNG Delepierre 482, VF, weight 8.348 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, Locroi Epizephyrii mint, c. 317 - 310 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, thunderbolt below; reverse ΛOKPΩN, head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, wearing pearl necklace; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

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In 344 B.C., the aristocracy of Syracuse appealed to their mother city of Corinth against their tyrant Dionysius II. The Corinthian general Timoleon led a liberation force to Sicily. Landing at Tauromenium (Taormina) in the summer, Timoleon faced two armies, one under Dionysius and the other under Hicetas (tyrant of nearby Leontini), who has also called in Carthaginian forces. By shrewd tactics Timoleon defeated his enemies and occupied Syracuse.
SH58242. Silver stater, Pegasi I 460, BCD Korinth 135, gVF, toned, weight 8.131 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 345 - 307 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, ∆ below chin, I and herm with kerykeion and cornucopia behind; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Kassander, Regent 317 - 305 B.C., King 305 - 298 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander III

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When Antipater transferred the regency of Macedon to Polyperchon, Kassander rejected his father's decision, obtained support from Antigonus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, defeated Polyperchon, and in 317 B.C. declared himself Regent. After Olympias had Philip III assassinated later that year, Kassander besieged her in Pydna. The city fell two years later, Olympias was killed, and Alexander IV and Roxanne were imprisoned. To associate himself with the Argead dynasty Kassander married Alexander's half-sister, Thessalonica. About 310 B.C. he had Alexander IV and Roxanne poisoned. Kassander proclaimed himself King in 305 B.C. After Antigonus was killed at the Battle of Ipsus in 301 B.C., Kassander held undisputed rule of Macedonia. He had little time to savor the fact, dying of dropsy in 297 B.C.
SH08438. Silver tetradrachm, Price 459, Müller Alexander 75, SNG Alpha Bank 528, SNG Cop 699 var. (Pegasus over strut), SNG München -, EF, beautiful coin with some mint luster, weight 17.21 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 135o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 307 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle extended in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Λ over torch left, Pegasus forepart right under throne; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 404 - 435 B.C.

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Corinth is mentioned many times in the New Testament, largely in connection with Apostle Paul's mission there. Paul first visited the city in 51 or 52 and resided there for 18 months (Acts 18:1-18). Paul wrote at least two epistles to the Christian community, the First Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Ephesus) and the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Macedonia).
SH68246. Silver stater, Pegasi I 246/2; McClean 6171; BMC Corinth -; BCD Korinth -; SNG Cop -, gVF, light toning, small flan flaw on Pegsos, weight 8.442 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Corinth mint, c. 404 - 435 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying right, pointed wings, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right wearing a plain Corinthian helmet over leather cap, aphlaston behind; scarce; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

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Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards that prevailed in the city). Corinth was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or traveling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors.
SH46853. Silver stater, Pegasi I 457, BCD Korinth 133, Ravel 1081, HGC 4 1848, BMC Corinth -, VF, weight 8.368 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 315o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, ∆ below chin, I and Artemis running right with torch behind; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

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SH46854. Silver stater, Pegasi I 385, BCD Korinth -, SNG Cop -, BMC Corinth -, weight 8.550 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right, facing bearded ithyphallic herm (terminal) and N behind; scarce; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Friday, November 15, 2019.
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Pegasus