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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ PegasosView Options:  |  |  |   

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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As reported by B.V. Head in Chapter 5 of Excavations at Ephesus: The Archaic Artemisia, a coin of this type was one of five coins found in excavations underneath the foundations of the southern wall of the B cella of the Artemisia at Ephesus. The other four coins were lion head and lion paw types. Head wrote these coins must have been deposited during construction of the First Temple (A). Weidauer 145 is the coin found at the Artemisia (= Head Artemisia 79), now at the Arkeoloji Mzesi, Istanbul. The Weidauer coins appear to be struck with the same obverse die.
SH84450. Electrum 1/24 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 145 - 146; Head Artemisia p. 86 and pl. 2, 79; cf. SNGvA 1781 (different style); Rosen 287 (same); SNG Kayhan 717 (same), gVF, centered, edge cracks, some die rust (also found on other examples of this type), weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 6.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse bridled head and neck of Pegasos left, with top edge of wing visible; reverse four raised squares in a cross pattern within incuse square punch; very rare; $1450.00 (1290.50)


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 375 - 345 B.C.

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Corinth is mentioned many times in the New Testament, largely in connection with Apostle Paul's mission there. Paul first visited the city in 51 or 52 and resided there for 18 months (Acts 18:1-18). Paul wrote at least two epistles to the Christian community, the First Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Ephesus) and the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Macedonia).
GS85150. Silver stater, Pegasi I 238/1 (same obv. die); Ravel 574; BMC Corinth p. 13, 140; BCD Korinth 68; HGC 4 1834; SNG Cop -, aEF, nice toning, tight flan, areas of corrosion, weight 8.331 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 45o, Corinth mint, 375 - 345 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying right, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right wearing a Corinthian helmet over a leather cap, thymiaterion (incense burner) behind; ex Art of Money (Portland, OR); $500.00 (445.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales

RS77156. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 921 (C2); RSC II 47; BMCRE II Vespasian 193; BnF III Vespasian 169; SRCV I 2637, VF, nice style, obverse slightly off-center, edge cracks, weight 3.366 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, early 76 - early 77 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, Pegasus standing right, archaic curved wing (only near wing showing), raising left foreleg; $190.00 (169.10)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Chabakta, Pontos

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Chabakta was an important town within the territory of Amisos. Quite a few towns first struck coins under Mithradates VI, including Amaseia, Abonutheichos, Chabakta, Comana, Laodiceia, and Taulara. The cities issued the same types indicating central control over the mints.
GB76955. Bronze AE 24, SNG Stancomb 714; SNG BM 1258; SNG Cop IV 204; Rec Gen p. 77, 1; BMC Pontus -; SNGvA -; Laffaille -, aVF, well centered, uneven green patina, weight 10.718 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chabakta mint, c. 100 - 70 B.C.; obverse head of Perseus right, wearing Phrygian helmet with griffin's head crest and diadem; reverse Pegasos grazing left, monogram left, XABAKTΩN in exergue; very rare; $180.00 (160.20)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB79948. Bronze AE 24, BMC Pontus p. 18, 60 ff. var.; SNG BM 1212 ff. var.; SNG Stancomb 701 ff. var.; SNG Cop 158 f. var.; SNGvA 62 var.; HGC 7 239 (S) (all var. monogram), gVF, attractive, centered on a tight flan, weight 12.653 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse AMIΣOY, Pegasos grazing left, monogram below; $180.00 (160.20)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB84991. Bronze AE 23, SNG BM 1213; SNG Stancomb 702; Rec Gen p. 69, 32; SNG Cop 159 corr. (right monogram); BMC Pontus p. 18, 60 ff. corr. (same); HGC 7 237 (S), VF, tight thick flan, uneven but attractive patina, weight 12.122 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse Pegasos grazing left, right fore-leg raised, AMIΣOY over two monograms in exergue; $150.00 (133.50)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77160. Bronze AE 25, BMC Pontus p. 18, 60; SNG BM 1213; Rec Gen p. 69, 32; SNG Stancomb 702; SNG Cop 159; SNGvA 62 var. (addl. monogram upper l.); HGC 7 239 (S), VF, attractive coin, some tiny pitting on the reverse, weight 13.070 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse Pegasos grazing left, AMIΣOY over two monograms in exergue; $135.00 (120.15)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77161. Bronze AE 25, BMC Pontus p. 18, 61; SNG BM 1213 var.; SNG Stancomb 702 f. var.; SNG Cop 158 var.; Rec Gen p. 69, 32 var.; HGC 7 237 (S) (all var. right monogram), VF, attractive coin, coarse green patina, weight 13.134 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse Pegasos grazing left, AMIΣOY over two monograms in exergue; $135.00 (120.15)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

Click for a larger photo
Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77037. Bronze AE 23, SNG BM 1216; BMC Pontus p. 18, 60 ff. var. (no A); SNG Stancomb 701 ff. var. (controls); SNG Cop 158 f. var. (same); SNGvA 62 var. (same), VF, nice style, weight 12.6 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse AMIΣOY, Pegasos grazing left, monograms left, monogram and A below; $120.00 (106.80)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales

RS77332. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 921 (C2); RSC II 47; BMCRE II Vespasian 193; BnF III Vespasian 169; SRCV I 2637, aVF, toned, light porosity, reverse die wear, marks and scratches, weight 3.220 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, Rome mint, as caesar, early 76 - early 77 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, Pegasus standing right, archaic curved wing (only near wing showing), raising left foreleg; $105.00 (93.45)




  



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