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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Pegasos||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.

Ambrakia, Epirus, Greece, c. 458 - 426 B.C.

|Epirus|, |Ambrakia,| |Epirus,| |Greece,| |c.| |458| |-| |426| |B.C.||stater|NEW
Ambracia (modern Arta) was founded as a Corinthian colony 650 - 625 B.C. Its economy was based on farmlands, fishing, timber for shipbuilding, and the exporting the produce of Epirus. In 433, Ambracia fought with Corinth at the Battle of Sybota, against the rebellious Corinthian colony of Corcyra (modern Corfu). Ambracia was besieged by Philip II and forced to accept a Macedonian garrison in 338. In 294, after 43 years of semi-autonomy, Ambracia was given by the son of Cassander to Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, who made it his capital, and adorned it with palace, temples and theaters. In the wars of Philip V of Macedon and the Epirotes against the Aetolian league (220-205) it changed sides and ultimately joined the Aetolians. Against Rome, it stood a stubborn siege, including the first known use of poison gas, against Roman siege tunnels. It was captured and plundered by Marcus Fulvius Nobilior in 189 B.C., after which it gradually fell into insignificance.Epirus and Environs
GS95936. Silver stater, Ravel Colts 22 (-/P12); Pegasi II p. 439, 8; HGC 3.1 197 (R2); BMC Corinth -; SNG Cop -, SNG Tubingen -, VF, toned, struck with worn dies, tight oval flan, weight 8.277 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Ambrakia (Arta, Greece) mint, c. 458 - 426 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying right, A below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet, no leather cap or neck guard, hair in long wavy locks over neck, all within incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $600.00 SALE |PRICE| $540.00
 


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

|Archaic| |Electrum|, |Ionia,| |c.| |600| |-| |550| |B.C.||1/24| |stater|
As reported by B.V. Head in Chapter 5 of Excavations at Ephesus: The Archaic Artemisia, a coin of this type was one of five coins found in excavations underneath the foundations of the southern wall of the B cella of the Artemisia at Ephesus. The other four coins were lion head and lion paw types. Head wrote these coins must have been deposited during construction of the First Temple (A). Weidauer 145 is the coin found at the Artemisia (= Head Artemisia 79), now at the Arkeoloji Müzesi, Istanbul. The Weidauer coins appear to be struck with the same obverse die.
SH84450. Electrum 1/24 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 145 - 146; Head Artemisia p. 86 and pl. 2, 79; cf. SNGvA 1781 (different style); Rosen 287 (same); SNG Kayhan 717 (same), gVF, centered, edge cracks, some die rust (also found on other examples of this type), weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 6.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse bridled head and neck of Pegasos left, with top edge of wing visible; reverse four raised squares in a cross pattern within incuse square punch; very rare; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 404 - 435 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |404| |-| |435| |B.C.||stater|
Corinth is mentioned many times in the New Testament, largely in connection with Apostle Paul's mission there. Paul first visited the city in 51 or 52 and resided there for 18 months (Acts 18:1-18). Paul wrote at least two epistles to the Christian community, the First Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Ephesus) and the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Macedonia).
SH68246. Silver stater, Pegasi I 246/2; McClean 6171; BMC Corinth -; BCD Korinth -; SNG Cop -, gVF, light toning, small flan flaw on Pegsos, weight 8.442 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Corinth mint, c. 404 - 435 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying right, pointed wings, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right wearing a plain Corinthian helmet over leather cap, aphlaston behind; scarce; SOLD







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