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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ PegasosView Options:  |  |  | 

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

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Corinth, on the Isthmus of Corinth about halfway between Athens and Sparta, was the largest city and richest port in ancient Greece. Corinth allied with Sparta from about 550 B.C. until the early 4th Century B.C. The city adopted an independent policy in the various wars of the 4th Century. After the Macedonian conquest of Greece, the Acrocorinth was the seat of a Macedonian garrison until 243 B.C., when the city was liberated and joined the Achaean League. In 146 B.C., Corinth was captured and destroyed by Roman armies. Re-founded as a Roman colony in 44 B.C., Corinth flourished once again and became the administrative capital of the Roman province of Achaea.
GS89061. Silver stater, Pegasi 426; BCD Corinth 101; SNG Cop 73; BMC Corinth p. 26, 258; Ravel 1008, HGC 4 1848, gVF, toned, slight roughness, weight 7.893 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 345 - 307 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, pointed wing, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, helmet without crest ornamented with a laurel wreath, A-P below divided by neck truncation, eagle (control symbol) standing left behind with wings closed and head turned back right; ex CNG e-auction 232 (28 Apr 2010), lot 91; $700.00 (€616.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS88925. Silver drachm, Price 1389, Müller Alexander 912, SNG Saroglos 708, SNG Alpha Bank 583, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, gVF, well centered, light scratches, porosity, earthen encrustations, weight 4.125 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 90o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, Pegasos forepart (control) left, MAΛ monogram (control) under throne; $190.00 (€167.20)
 


Lampsakos, Mysia, 394 - 330 B.C.

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Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GB88954. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 196, Baldwin Lampsakos 36 ff. var., SNG Delepierre 2525 var., BMC Mysia 49 var., Dewing 2199 var., SNGvA 1296 var. (control varieties), aVF, dark toning, bumps and marks, high points flat, weight 1.123 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 394 - 330 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of Pegasos flying right, curved archaic style wing, Λ-A-M around above, star (control symbol) below; ex Dmitry Markov Coins & Medals; $185.00 (€162.80)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

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Timoleon installed a democracy in 345 B.C. After the long series of internal struggles had weakened Syracuse's power, Timoleon tried to remedy this, defeating the Carthaginians near the Krimisos river in 339 B.C. Unfortunately the struggle among the city's parties restarted after his death and ended with the rise of another tyrant, Agathocles, who seized power in 317 B.C.
GI91325. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 211, 92 DS 25 (same obv. die); BMC Sicily p. 188, 304 var. (no helmet); SNG ANS 1384 var. (same); HGC 2 1505 (S); SNG Cop -; SNG Mün -, gVF, well centered, rough corrosion/encrustation, weight 2.588 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, Syracuse mint, c. 336 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of head of nymph Arethusa facing slightly left, Thessalian helmet (control symbol) left; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, Pegasos forepart flying left, archaic curved wing; Ex Eric J. Engstrom Collection; scarce; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB89732. Bronze AE 25, SNG BM 1217; BMC Pontus p. 19, 64 var. (monogram left slightly different); SNG Cop 158 var. (monograms); SNG Stancomb 701 var. (same); HGC 7 239 (S), gVF, slightly off center, scattered porosity, small edge cracks, weight 12.378 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 30o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse Pegasos grazing left, right foreleg raised, monogram left, AMIΣOY over monogram in exergue; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS84664. Silver drachm, Price 1382, Müller Alexander 612, SNG Cop 887, SNG Alpha Bank 578, SNG Saroglos 705, ADM II series X, SNG München -, VF/gF, nice style, well centered on a tight flan, toned, reverse double struck, scratches and marks, some porosity, weight 4.094 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, lotus tipped long scepter vertical in left hand, forepart of Pegasos left, No monogram under throne; $125.00 (€110.00)
 


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

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Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empúries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Chabakta, Pontos

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Chabakta was an important town within the territory of Amisos. Quite a few towns first struck coins under Mithradates VI, including Amaseia, Abonutheichos, Chabakta, Comana, Laodiceia, and Taulara. The cities issued the same types indicating central control over the mints.
GB76955. Bronze AE 24, SNG Stancomb 714; SNG BM 1258; SNG Cop IV 204; Rec Gen p. 77, 1; BMC Pontus -; SNGvA -; Laffaille -, aVF, well centered, uneven green patina, weight 10.718 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chabakta mint, c. 100 - 70 B.C.; obverse head of Perseus right, wearing Phrygian helmet with griffin's head crest and diadem; reverse Pegasos grazing left, monogram left, XABAKTΩN in exergue; very rare; $110.00 (€96.80)
 


Adramytion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

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According to the Acts of the Apostles, whilst en route to Rome, St. Paul departed Caesarea Maritima on a ship from the city of Adramyttium which took him to Myra in Lycia.
GB87701. Bronze AE 10, SNG BnF 1, SNGvA 7192; Klein 247, Waddington 607, Traité II 2, 2515, BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, earthen deposits, weight 0.947 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 90o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse A∆PA, forepart of Pegasos right, with archaic style curved wings, grain ear right below; scarce; $105.00 (€92.40)
 







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Pegasus