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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Pegasos||View Options:  |  |  | 

Pegasus on Ancient Coins

Pegasos, the celebrated winged horse, and symbol of Corinth, was sired by Poseidon in his role as horse-god, and sprung from the blood of Medusa. Flying to Helicon he struck the earth with his hoof creating the fountain of Hippocrene, sacred to the nine muses. Pegasos was thus a symbol of Apollo, the God of Poetry and Song, who presided over the muses. Bellerophon rode Pegasos in his combat with the Chimaera.

Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |29|
Samosata was an ancient city on the right (west) bank of the Euphrates whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the newly constructed Atatürk Dam. The founder of the city was Sames, a Satrap of Commagene who made it his capital. The city was sometimes called Antiochia in Commagene and served as the capital for the Hellenistic Kingdom of Commagene from c. 160 BC until it was surrendered to Rome in 72. A civil metropolis from the days of Emperor Hadrian, Samosata was the home of the Legio VI Ferrata and later Legio XVI Flavia Firma, and the terminus of several military roads. Seven Christian martyrs were crucified in 297 in Samosata for refusing to perform a pagan rite in celebration of the victory of Maximian over the Sassanids. It was at Samosata that Julian II had ships made in his expedition against Sapor, and it was a natural crossing-place in the struggle between Heraclius and Chosroes in the 7th century.
RY93572. Bronze AE 29, BMC Galatia p. 122, 56; Butcher 33c; SNG Cop 23 corr. (Philip I), Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, toned, light deposits, porosity, weight 17.448 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, Jul/Aug 247 - Late 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYAI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CAMOCATEΩN, city goddess seated left on rock, turreted, veiled, right arm on leg, grain ears downward in right hand, left hand on rock, Pegasus leaping left at feet; ex Roma e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), 517; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

|Iberia|, |Indigets,| |Untikesken,| |Emporion,| |Iberia,| |c.| |130| |-| |90| |B.C.||as|
Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empúries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

|Archaic| |Electrum|, |Ionia,| |c.| |600| |-| |550| |B.C.||1/24| |stater|
As reported by B.V. Head in Chapter 5 of Excavations at Ephesus: The Archaic Artemisia, a coin of this type was one of five coins found in excavations underneath the foundations of the southern wall of the B cella of the Artemisia at Ephesus. The other four coins were lion head and lion paw types. Head wrote these coins must have been deposited during construction of the First Temple (A). Weidauer 145 is the coin found at the Artemisia (= Head Artemisia 79), now at the Arkeoloji Müzesi, Istanbul. The Weidauer coins appear to be struck with the same obverse die.
SH84450. Electrum 1/24 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 145 - 146; Head Artemisia p. 86 and pl. 2, 79; cf. SNGvA 1781 (different style); Rosen 287 (same); SNG Kayhan 717 (same), gVF, centered, edge cracks, some die rust (also found on other examples of this type), weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 6.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse bridled head and neck of Pegasos left, with top edge of wing visible; reverse four raised squares in a cross pattern within incuse square punch; very rare; SOLD







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