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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ DogView Options:  |  |  | 

Dogs on Ancient Coins

Piakos, Sicily, c. 425 - 400 B.C.

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Struck with unsigned dies by the "Maestro della Foglia." Rizzo was the first to suggest that this famed artist who engraved magnificent masterpieces for Katane, was also the engraver for the dies of this Piakos' coinage. Other experts have agreed. This particular type might have been his very first work. Calciati dates the type to a possible period of transitory independence, 425 - 424 B.C., during the time of the first Carthaginian invasion of Sicily to shortly after Gela's conference. Other authorities date it as late as 400 B.C.
SH71341. Bronze tetras, Calciati III p. 198, 2; Rizzo pl. LX, 14; HGC 2 1101 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG Munchen -; SNG Morcom -, VF, weight 2.357 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 45o, Piakos mint, c. 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse PIAK (pellets are mark of value), laureate and horned head of a young river-god left; reverse hound right attacking fallen stag right, seizing her by the throat, barley kernel on left and another on right; rare; $300.00 (267.00)


Phaistos, Crete, c. 3rd Century B.C.

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In Greek mythology, Talos (or Talon) was a giant winged man of bronze who protected Europa in Crete from pirates and invaders. He circled the island's shores three times daily. The author of Bibliotheke thought Talos' bronze nature might indicate he was a survivor from Hesiod's mythical Age of Bronze. The satirist Lucian took this absurd notion that men of Hesiod's Age of Bronze were actually made of bronze and, for humorous effect, extended it to men of the Age of Gold.
GB85359. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos Crte 74; SNG Cop 520; BMC Crete p. 64, 27-28, F, a little rough, weight 3.702 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 225o, Phaistos mint, c. 3rd century B.C.; obverse Talos advancing right, nude, hurling stone in his right hand, holding another in his left hand; reverse hound on the scent to right, ΦAIC/TIΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; rare; $280.00 (249.20)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

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With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious and cited him as an example of those who by their crimes come to be princes. According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI76940. Bronze AE 13, cf. Calciati II p. 284, 149 R1 6 (controls, Timoleon); SNG ANS 744 (same); SNG Morcom 748 (same); HGC 2 1525 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG Mn -, BMC Sicily -, VF, well centered, green patina, some corrosion, weight 1.877 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 295 - 289 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣION, laureate head of Apollo left, oinochoe behind; reverse dog seated left, looking back right at tail?, Y (control letter) above, A (control letter) in exergue; $225.00 (200.25)


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., Deultum, Thrace

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Artemis is depicted here in the same pose as The Diana of Versailles, a slightly over life-size Roman marble statue from the 1st or 2nd century A.D., copying a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 B.C. The sculpture has a stag at her side. The sculpture may have come from a sanctuary at Nemi or possibly from Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli. In 1556, it was given by Pope Paul IV to Henry II of France, a subtle allusion to the king's mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It is now in the Muse du Louvre, Paris.
RP79982. Bronze AE 25, Jurukova Deultum 80, SNG Deultum 162, Draganov Deultum 162 (O28/R284), Varbanov I 2169 (R4) corr. (running left), Moushmov 3573, SNG Cop -, VF, excellent portrait, well centered, nice sea green patina, light marks and scratches, areas of light corrosion, weight 9.948 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse C M OPEL ANTONINVS DIADV, bare-headed, draped bust right, from behind; reverse COL FL PA C DEVLT, Artemis (Diana) advancing right, drawing arrow from quiver with right hand, bow in left hand, dog bounding right at feet on far side; ex Apollo Numismatics ($125, summer 2008); rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The ancients did not agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. On this coin, Pluto's influence is evident with the fearsome Kerberos at Serapis' feet.
RP72130. Bronze drachm, cf. Dattari-Savio 8907 - 8908, Dattari-Savio Suppl. pl. 20, 165, Geissen 1616/1620, Milne 2011, Kampmann-Ganschow 35.444, Emmett 1668, aF, porous, rough, flan cracks, weight 22.957 g, maximum diameter 34.6 mm, die axis 45o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 148 - 28 Aug 149 A.D.; obverse AVT K T AIΛ A∆P ANTWNINOC CEB EVC, laureate head right; reverse L ∆W∆EKATOV (year 12), temple with two columns, Serapis seated left within, right hand resting on a head Cerberus at his feet, long scepter vertical behind in left, orb in pediment; $95.00 (84.55)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The ancients did not agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. On this coin, Pluto's influence is evident with the fearsome Kerberos at Serapis' feet.
RX76581. Billon tetradrachm, Kampmann 32.571, Geissen 1094, Dattari 1479, Milne 1399, Emmett 892, BMC Alexandria 623, SRCV II 6739 var. (date), aF, well centered, grainy and porous, weight 10.343 g, maximum diameter 13.74 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 133 - 28 Aug 134 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC TPAIAN A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse Serapis seated left, reaching with right to Cerberus at feet left, long scepter vertical in right, LI - H (regnal year 18) across fields; $90.00 (80.10)


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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Diana is depicted here in the same pose as The Diana of Versailles, a slightly over life-size Roman marble statue from the 1st or 2nd century A.D., copying a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 B.C. The sculpture may have come from a sanctuary at Nemi or possibly from Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli. In 1556, it was given by Pope Paul IV to Henry II of France, a subtle allusion to the king's mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It is now in the Muse du Louvre, Paris.
RP84156. Bronze triassarion, H-J Marcianopolis 6.25.13.2 (R3); Varbanov I 1311 (R3); AMNG I/I 787; BMC Thrace p. 33, 40; SNG Cop -, VF, grainy, large flan split/crack, centration dimples, weight 8.989 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, 217 - 218 A.D.; obverse M K OΠEΛAION ANTΩNEINOC K, Bare headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse MAPKIANO-ΠOΛEITΩN, Artemis advancing right, bow in left hand, drawing arrow from quiver with right hand, hound at feet springing right on her far side, Γ (mark of value) behind; $90.00 (80.10)







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Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 20, 2017.
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