Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Camel||View Options:  |  |  |   

Camels on Ancient Coins

The camel was a symbol of Arabia.


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Provincial Arabia

Click for a larger photo
The camel was the sacred animal and symbol of Dusares, the main Nabataean god. Camels were sacrificed to him. The Romans made the camel their symbol of Arabia.
SH90321. Silver drachm, Sydenham Caesarea 204; Kindler Bostra pl. VI, 10 ff. var.; BMC Galatia p. 54, 65 var. (Caesarea, Cappadocia); SNG ANS 1159 var. (all var. bust), gVF, superb heroic portrait, weight 3.409 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 112 - 117 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANΩ APICTΩ CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate, bare-chest bust right, with slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠA TO ς (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 6th time), Bactrian camel, with two humps, walking left on exergual line; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins, extremely rare with this bust; SOLD


Roman Republic, A. Plautius, c. 55 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 67 B.C., Aristobulus II rebelled against his older brother Hyrcanus II, the king of Judaea. Both brothers appealed to Pompey's deputy Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, who, bribed by a gift of 400 talents, decided in favor of Aristobulus. When Pompey arrived in Syria in 63 B.C., both brothers sent delegates to Damascus, but Pompey did not make an immediate decision. Aristobulus' followers refused to open the gates of Jerusalem and Romans forces besieged and captured the city. Pompey deemed Hyrcanus II, the elder, weaker brother a more reliable ally. Hyrcanus was restored as high priest, but not as king. Aristobulus was taken to Rome as a prisoner. In 57 B.C. Aristobulus escaped to Judaea and instigated another rebellion. A young cavalry commander, Marc Antony, led several men to scale Aristobulus' fortifications leading to his recapture. At the time this coin was struck in 55 B.C., Aristobulus was a prisoner in Rome. Julius Caesar released him in 49 B.C., hoping to turn Judaea against Pompey, but on his was to Judaea he was poisoned by a Pompey supporter. With help from the Parthians, Aristobulus' son Antigonus rebelled against Rome and became king in 40 B.C. He was defeated by Rome and killed in 37 B.C.

This special issue was struck by an Aedile Curule. Aediles supervised public works and staged games. Since this issue bears turreted Cybele, we may speculate it was to finance a building project.
SH56043. Silver denarius, RSC I Plautia 13, Sydenham 932, Crawford 431/1, BMCRR Rome 3916, Russo RBW 1540, SRCV I 395, VF, banker's mark, weight 3.335 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse AED CVR S C downwards on left, A PLAVTIVS downwards on right, turreted head of Cybele right, wearing cruciform earring, hair rolled and in knot at the back, locks falling down neck; reverse Bacchius Judaeus (Aristobulus II High Priest and King of Judaea) kneeling right, with left hand holding reins of camel standing right on his far side, raising olive branch in right hand, IVDAEVS upward on right, BACCHIVS in exergue; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Provincial Arabia

Click for a larger photo
Bostra was first mentioned in the documents of Tutmose III and Akhenaton (14th century BC). Bosra was the first Nabataean city in the 2nd century B.C. The Nabataean Kingdom was conquered by Cornelius Palma, a general of Trajan, in 106 A.D. Under the Roman Empire, Bosra was renamed Nova Trajana Bostra, and was the residence of the legio III Cyrenaica and capital of the Roman province Arabia Petraea. The city flourished and became a major metropolis at the juncture of several trade routes, including the Roman road to the Red Sea. The two Councils of Arabia were held at Bostra in 246 and 247 AD. The city continued under the Byzantine Empire, was conquered by the Sassanid Persians in the early 7th century, and finally conquered by the forces of the Rashidun Caliphate under Khalid ibn Walid in the Battle of Bosra in 634.
RS46939. Silver drachm, Kindler Bostra 11, Sydenham Caesarea 205, Metcalf 18, VF, nicely centered, weight 3.267 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 112 - 114 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANW APICTW CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠA TO ς (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 6th time), Bactrian camel, with two humps, walking left on exergual line; SOLD


Roman Republic, Marcus Aemilius Scaurus & Publius Plautius Hypsaeus, 58 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
M. Aemilius Scaurus, in 62 B.C., as quaestor to Pompey, was sent against King Aretas but withdrew when Aretas paid 300 talents. Aemilius was curule aedile when this coin was struck. This was the first time a moneyer publicized an event from his own career on coinage. Later he was praetor and propraetor, lost a campaign for Consul, and successfully defended Cicero. In 52 B.C., he was charged with bribery and went into exile.
RR13687. Silver denarius, Crawford 422/1b, Sydenham 913, RSC I Aemilia 8, RBW Collection 1519, SRCV I 379, gVF, weight 4.089 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 58 B.C.; obverse Aretas, King of Nabataea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet, M SCAVR / AED CVR above, EX - S C at sides, REX ARETAS in exergue; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, scorpion below, [P] HYPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPT on right, C HYPSAE COS / PREIVE[R?] in exergue; very attractive toning with iridescent golden and coppery reds; SOLD


Roman Republic, A. Plautius, c. 55 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 67 B.C., Aristobulus II rebelled against his older brother Hyrcanus II, the king of Judaea. Both brothers appealed to Pompey's deputy Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, who, bribed by a gift of 400 talents, decided in favor of Aristobulus. When Pompey arrived in Syria in 63 B.C., both brothers sent delegates to Damascus, but Pompey did not make an immediate decision. Aristobulus' followers refused to open the gates of Jerusalem and Romans forces besieged and captured the city. Pompey deemed Hyrcanus II, the elder, weaker brother a more reliable ally. Hyrcanus was restored as high priest, but not as king. Aristobulus was taken to Rome as a prisoner. In 57 B.C. Aristobulus escaped to Judaea and instigated another rebellion. A young cavalry commander, Marc Antony, led several men to scale Aristobulus' fortifications leading to his recapture. At the time this coin was struck in 55 B.C., Aristobulus was a prisoner in Rome. Julius Caesar released him in 49 B.C., hoping to turn Judaea against Pompey, but on his was to Judaea he was poisoned by a Pompey supporter. With help from the Parthians, Aristobulus' son Antigonus rebelled against Rome and became king in 40 B.C. He was defeated by Rome and killed in 37 B.C.

This special issue was struck by an Aedile Curule. Aediles supervised public works and staged games. Since this issue bears turreted Cybele, we may speculate it was to finance a building project.
RR91410. Silver denarius, RSC I Plautia 13, Sydenham 932, Crawford 431/1, BMCRR Rome 3916, Russo RBW 1540, SRCV I 395, VF, old collection toning, reverse a little off center, weight 3.803 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse AED CVR S C downwards on left, A PLAVTIVS downwards on right, turreted head of Cybele right, wearing cruciform earring, hair rolled and in knot at the back, locks falling down neck; reverse Bacchius Judaeus (Aristobulus II High Priest and King of Judaea) kneeling right, with left hand holding reins of camel standing right on his far side, raising olive branch in right hand, IVDAEVS upward on right, BACCHIVS in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD


Roman Republic, Marcus Aemilius Scaurus & Publius Plautius Hypsaeus, 58 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
M. Aemilius Scaurus, in 62 B.C., as quaestor to Pompey, was sent against King Aretas but withdrew when Aretas paid 300 talents. Aemilius was curule aedile when this coin was struck. This was the first time a moneyer publicized an event from his own career on coinage. Later he was praetor and propraetor, lost a campaign for Consul, and successfully defended Cicero. In 52 B.C., he was charged with bribery and went into exile.
RR91411. Silver denarius, Crawford 422/1b, Sydenham 913, RSC I Aemilia 8, RBW Collection 1519, SRCV I 379, gVF, beautiful old collection toning, obverse a little off center, weight 3.803 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 58 B.C.; obverse Aretas, King of Nabataea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet, M SCAVR above, EX - S C at sides, REX ARETAS in exergue; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, scorpion below, P HYPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPT on right, C HYPSAE COS / PREIVE in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

Click for a larger photo
Bostra was the northern Nabataean capital, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated it a metropolis.
RS77327. Silver drachm, Metcalf Tell Kalak 15; SNG ANS 1155; Sydenham Cappadocia 184 (Caesarea); BMC Galatia p. 54, 62 var. (Caesarea, no drapery); SNG Cop -, VF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off parts of legends, toned, light marks, slight porosity, weight 3.300 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, Bostra (Bosra, Syria) mint, 112 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIAN CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ Iς YΠAT ς (holder of Tribunitian power for 16 years, consul for the 6th time), Arabia standing facing, head left, branch in right, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel left in background on left; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 106 A.D., King Rabbel II of Nabataea died, after ruling since 70 A.D. Although there is no evidence of a pretext for annexation and Rabbel II had an heir named Obodas, Trajan moved Third Cyrenaica from Egypt into Petra and the Sixth Ferrata, a Syrian garrison unit, to occupy Bostra. It seems was some resistance from the Nabataean royal guard, but annexation was not widely resisted and there was little fighting. Trajan did not adopt the appellation Arabicus, as he did Dacius when he conquered Dacia, and Nabataean troops served as Roman auxiliary troops soon after conquest.
SH52310. Silver denarius, RIC II 142, Woytek 285b, RSC II 89, BMCRE III 297, SRCV II -, gVF, weight 2.963 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 103 - 111 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Arabia standing front, head left, branch in right hand, bundle of cinnamon sticks in left, camel walking left behind at feet; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type was issued to commemorate the founding of the Roman province Arabia Petraea, consisting of the former Nabataean kingdom in Jordan, the southern Levant, the Sinai Peninsula, and the northwestern area of the Arabian peninsula. Trajan completed the Via Nova Traiana, a road from Bostra through Petra to the port at Aqaba, made Bostra the capital of the province, and awarded Petra the status of metropolis. Unlike Armenia, Mesopotamia, and Assyria, Rome held Arabia long after Trajan's rule. In Diocletian's restructuring of the empire in 284 - 305, the province was enlarged to include parts of modern-day Israel. After Diocletian, Arabia became a part of the Diocese of Oriens ("the East"). In the Byzantine period, Arabia was the frontline of Byzantine-Sassanid Wars. In the 5th or 6th century, it was transformed into Palaestina Salutaris.
SH84710. Silver denarius, Woytek 396b, Strack 174, RIC II 245, RSC II 26, BMCRE III 474, SRCV II -, VF, nice portrait, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 3.328 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 112 - 113 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Arabia standing front, head left, branch downward in right hand, bundle of cinnamon sticks in right hand, camel walking left in background on left, ARAB ADQ in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 388, part of lot 704; SOLD


Roman Republic, Marcus Aemilius Scaurus & Publius Plautius Hypsaeus, 58 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
M. Aemilius Scaurus, in 62 B.C., as quaestor to Pompey, was sent against King Aretas but withdrew when Aretas paid 300 talents. Aemilius was curule aedile when this coin was struck. This was the first time a moneyer publicized an event from his own career on coinage. Later he was praetor and propraetor, lost a campaign for Consul, and successfully defended Cicero. In 52 B.C., he was charged with bribery and went into exile.
RR17981. Silver denarius, Crawford 422/1a, Sydenham 912, BMCRR Rome 3877, RSC I Aemilia 9, SRCV I 378, aVF, weight 3.847 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 58 B.C.; obverse Aretas, King of Nabataea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet, M SCAVR above, EX - S C at sides, AED CVR in ex; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, P HYPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPTV on right, C HYPSAE COS / PREIVER in exergue; scarce; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Tuesday, August 20, 2019.
Page created in 1.127 seconds.
Camels