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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Capricorn||View Options:  |  |  |   

Capricorns on Ancient Coins
Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Magnificent quality. Superb portrait of the finest Greek style. Rare in Greek style because most denarii of this type were struck in "Colonia Patricia" style.
SH16768. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1592, RIC I 541, BMCRE I 664, superb EF, weight 3.850 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Asia Minor mint, 27 - 20 B.C.; obverse laureate head right, dot border; reverse AVGVSTVS, capricorn left, holding globe, cornucopia above, rudder below; extraordinary high relief impossible to capture in a photograph, lustrous and nearly as struck; rare; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising signs. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority.
SH84736. Silver denarius, BnF I 1271 (same dies, attributed to auxiliary workshop, Colonia Patricia), RIC I 126 (R2), RSC I 21, BMCRE I 346, Hunter I 145, SRCV I 1592, Choice aMS, nearly as struck, mint luster, well centered and bold strike, a few light marks, obverse die wear, weight 3.809 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Spanish (Colonia Patricia?) mint, 16 B.C.; obverse bare head right, dot border, anepigraphic; reverse capricorn right, filleted cornucopia overflowing with grain and fruit on its back, celestial globe and rudder with tiller held between hooves, AVGVSTVS below; from the Marcelo Leal Collection; scarce; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Cistophori|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
The cistophorus was first struck by the Pergamene Kingdom was a tetradrachm (four-drachms coin) struck on a reduced Asian standard of about 3 grams per drachm. Its name was derived from the cista, a Dionysian cult snake basket that frequently appeared on the obverse. After the Pergamene Kingdom was bequeathed to Rome in 133 B.C., the Romans continued to strike cistophori for the Asia province, with a value equal to three denarii. The portrait of Augustus and later emperors replaced the cista on the obverse.
SH85435. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Sutherland Group VI, RPC I 2213, RSC I 16, RIC I 477, BnF I 916, BMCRE I 696, BMCRR East 263, SRCV I -, VF, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 11.796 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 30o, Ephesus mint, c. 25 - 20 B.C.; obverse IMP CAE-SAR (counterclockwise below), bare head right, linear border; reverse capricorn right, head turned back left, cornucopia on its back, AVGVSTVS below, all within laurel wreath; SOLD


Cyprus, Time of Augustus, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.

|Cyprus|, |Cyprus,| |Time| |of| |Augustus,| |27| |B.C.| |-| |14| |A.D.|, |hemiobol|
Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising signs. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority. Tiberius (born Nov. 13) was a Scorpio.
SH72881. Bronze hemiobol, RPC I 3916; Bank of Cyprus 6; BMC Galatia p. 112, 4 (Commagene); SNG Cop -, Choice EF, beautiful desert patina, weight 2.371 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cypriot mint, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse capricorn right, star with six rays above; reverse scorpion left, star with six rays above; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

|Titus|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.|, |denarius|
On 7th June 1974, during excavations of Pompeii's "House of the Gold Bracelet" an example of this type was discovered among 180 silver and 40 gold coins with the bodies of a group of victims. The traditional date given for the eruption of Vesuvius is 24 August 79 A.D. This traditional date is not, however, based on solid evidence. Contemporary sources and letters indicate that Titus did not receive his 15th Imperial acclamatio until September 79 A.D. The excavation of this coin type at Pompeii indicates the eruption did not occur until later in the fall.
RS06004. Silver denarius, RIC II 37, RSC II 294, BMCRE II 35. BnF III 32, SRCV I 2510, Choice EF, weight 3.38 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Sep - 31 Dec 79 A.D.; obverse IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P (tribunitian power 9 times, imperator 15 times, consul 7 times, father of the country), Capricorn left, globe below; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Parium, Mysia

|Parium|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Parium,| |Mysia|, |AE| |22|
Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising signs. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority.
RP75118. Brass AE 22, RPC II 887, SNG BnF 1460, gVF, slightly uneven strike, weight 6.211 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 1 Jul 69 - 24 Jun 79 A.D.; obverse VESPASIANVS CAESAR, laureate head right; reverse capricorn right, head turned back left, cornucopia on its back, AVGVSTVS below; very rare; SOLD


Cornelia Supera, Wife of Aemilian, 253 A.D., Parium, Mysia

|Parium|, |Cornelia| |Supera,| |Wife| |of| |Aemilian,| |253| |A.D.,| |Parium,| |Mysia|, |AE| |23|
Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion is now the village of Kemer in the township of Biga in Canakkale province of Turkey. In the Roman period, it was a major coastal city with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. This was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. It belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. In Roman times, it was a colonia, within the province of Asia. After that province was divided in the 4th century, it was in the province of Hellespontus. The ancient coinage of Parium is quite abundant.
RP89299. Bronze AE 23, RPC IX 381, SNGvA 7448, SNG Cop 302, cf. SNG BnF 1519/1518, VF, crude style, weight 4.203 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 270o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 253 A.D.; obverse C CORN SVPERA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane and beaded necklace; reverse C G I H P, blundered capricorn flying right, cornucopia projecting upwards from back; rare; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising signs. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority.
RS37540. Silver denarius, RIC I 174, RSC I 147, BnF I 1403, BMCRE I 465, Giard Lyon 29, gVF, weight 3.560 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 222o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 12 B.C.; obverse AVGVSTVS DIVI F, laureate head right, dot border; reverse IMP XI, capricorn right, holding globe; ex Spink, ex Gans collection; scarce; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Commemorative Issued by Titus

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Commemorative| |Issued| |by| |Titus|, |denarius|
One 23 June 79 A.D. Vespasian died from fever and diarrhea. Known for his humor, his last words on his deathbed were, "I think I'm turning into a god." Titus succeeded his father as Roman emperor and issued this coin to commemorate his father's consecration.
SH76410. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 Titus 357; RSC II 497; BMCRE II 129; BnF III 101; SRCV I 2569, Choice aEF, superb portrait, light toning on luster, weight 3.541 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse two Capricorns supporting shield inscribed S C, celestial globe below; from the Jeff Michniak Collection, the nicest example of this type handled by Forum to date; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

|Titus|, |Titus,| |24| |June| |79| |-| |13| |September| |81| |A.D.|, |denarius|
This reverse type was copied from coins of Augustus and was also used by Vespasian.

This variety without the Pater Patriae title appears to be very rare, suggesting that Titus assumed the title very shortly (a few days maybe) after the beginning of his ninth tribunician year on 1 July. RIC lists it as common, however, there are only two specimens on Coin Archives, only two in the Berk file, none in Reka Devnia, and this is the only example handled by Forum over 20 years.
SH51546. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 5 (C); Cohen I 280 (citing Paris but only the aureus present in the collection); BMCRE II p. 224 note, gF, weight 2.451 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, early Jul 79 A.D.; obverse IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TR P VIIII IMP XIII COS VII, capricorn left, globe below; very rare; SOLD




  




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