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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ HippocampView Options:  |  |  | 

Hippocamp

The hippocampi or hippocampus (plural: hippocampi) is a mythological creature shared by Phoenician, Greek, and Etruscan mythology. It is typically depicted with a horse forepart and a coiling, scaly, fishlike hindquarter.


Syracuse, Sicily, Dionysos I, 405 - 367 B.C.

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Dionysius I was tyrant of Syracuse. He conquered several cities in Sicily and southern Italy, opposed Carthage's influence in Sicily and made Syracuse the most powerful of the Western Greek colonies. He was regarded by the ancients as an example of the worst kind of despot - cruel, suspicious and vindictive.
GI76358. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 76, 34 (c. 409 B.C.); HGC 2 1456 (c. 375 - 344 B.C.); BMC Sicily p. 187, 292; SNG ANS 426 ff. (end 5th c. B.C.); SNG Cop -, gVF, attractive style, tight flan, some light corrosion, weight 5.429 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 405 - 390 B.C.; obverse ΣYPA, head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, no ornament on helmet, no control symbols; reverse hippocamp left, no bridle; $315.00 (280.35)


Syracuse, Sicily, Dionysos I, 405 - 367 B.C.

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Dionysius I was tyrant of Syracuse. He conquered several cities in Sicily and southern Italy, opposed Carthage's influence in Sicily and made Syracuse the most powerful of the Western Greek colonies. He was regarded by the ancients as an example of the worst kind of despot - cruel, suspicious and vindictive.
GB79577. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 83, 35; Boehringer pl. III, 30; SNG Munchen 1138; Favorito 13 (2nd Democracy, c. 413 BC); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; BMC Sicily -; HGC 2 -, F, glossy near black patina, weight 6.215 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 315o, Syracuse mint, c. 400 - 390 B.C.; obverse ΣYPA, head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet ornamented with a serpent; reverse bridled hippocamp left; ex Ancient Imports; rare with serpent; $90.00 (80.10)


Persian Empire, Gebal-Byblos, Phoenicia, King Azba'al, c. 400 - 376 B.C.

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Byblos produced papyrus and our word bible was derived from the name of this city. In the Persian period, 538 ? 332 B.C., Byblos was one of four Persian vassal kingdoms in Phoenicia; the other three were Sidon, Tyre, and Arwad.
GA84887. Silver 1/16 shekel, Betlyon 15; BMC Phoenicia p. 95, 6 - 7; HGC 10 134 (S), SNG Cop -, aVF, toned, obverse slightly off center, weight 0.589 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, die axis 90o, Byblos mint, c. 400 - 376 B.C.; obverse galley left with lion head prow ornament, two hoplites on-board, hippocamp left below, Phoenician letters AZ (Azba'al) above tail; reverse Phoenician legend: AZBAL MLK GBL (Azba'al King of Gebal), lion bringing down a bull; scarce; $65.00 (57.85)


Syracuse, Sicily, Dionysos I, 405 - 367 B.C.

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Dionysius I was tyrant of Syracuse. He conquered several cities in Sicily and southern Italy, opposed Carthage's influence in Sicily and made Syracuse the most powerful of the Western Greek colonies. He was regarded by the ancients as an example of the worst kind of despot - cruel, suspicious and vindictive.
GB65232. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 86, 34 (c. 409 B.C.); HGC 2 1456 (c. 375 - 344 B.C.); BMC Sicily p. 187, 292; SNG ANS 426 ff. (end 5th c. B.C.); SNG Cop -, VF, some corrosion on obv, weight 6.398 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 405 - 390 B.C.; obverse ΣYPA, head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, no ornament on helmet, no control symbols; reverse hippocamp left, no bridle; $50.00 (44.50)


Solous, Sicily, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

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Solous, a Punic town, was attacked and damaged by Dionysios in 396 - 395 B.C., but recovered. In 306, the town received a group of mercenaries who rebelled against Agathocles, and it became a base for the Carthaginian army. The Romans occupied Solous in 244 B.C.
GB68416. Bronze AE 13, Calciati I p. 309, 3; SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, SNG Munchen -, BMC Sicily -, F, corrosion, reverse off-center, weight 1.741 g, maximum diameter 13.0 mm, die axis 315o, Solos mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of young Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse hippocamp left; rare; $45.00 (40.05)







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Catalog current as of Thursday, August 17, 2017.
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Hippocamps on Ancient Coins