Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. FORVM Has Evacuated for Hurricane Florence, Shipping Will be Delayed Please do order now but understand we will not be able to ship until at least 17 September. Thanks for supporting FORVM! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. FORVM Has Evacuated for Hurricane Florence, Shipping Will be Delayed Please do order now but understand we will not be able to ship until at least 17 September. Thanks for supporting FORVM!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ LionView Options:  |  |  |   

Lions on Ancient Coins

Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 465 - 420 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 467 B.C. the Athenian statesman and military commander Cimon, and his fleet of 200 ships, destroyed the Persian navy based at the mouth of the river Eurymedon in a surprise attack. In order to crush to Persian land forces, he tricked the Persians by sending his best fighters ashore wearing the garments of the hostages he had seized earlier. When they saw these men, the Persians thought that they were compatriots freed by the enemy and arranged festivities in celebration. Taking advantage of this, Cimon landed and annihilated the Persians. Aspendos then became a member of the Attic-Delos Maritime league.
SH87202. Silver stater, SNG BnF 13; SNGvA 4484 var. (turtle control symbol on obv. and rev.); BMC Pamphylia p. 94, 9 & pl. XIX,6; SNG Cop -, SNG Pfalzer -, VF, well centered, toned, bumps and marks, obverse struck with a very worn die, edge crack, weight 11.209 g, maximum diameter 21.53 mm, Aspendos mint, c. 465 - 420 B.C.; obverse warrior advancing right, wearing crested helmet, couched spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; reverse triskeles of human legs left, lion crouching left on far side, EΣT above, all within an incuse square; very rare; $800.00 (680.00)


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 445 - 435 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type is known to have ivy leaf, olive leaf and pellet (or globule) control marks in a variety of locations on the obverse or the reverse. This coin may have a pellet with the top half of the R, or it may be just a die defect. A pellet in this location is not listed in any of the references we examined or on any of the coins of this type we found online.
GI86585. Silver litra, Herzfelder p. 89, pl. IV, B; HN Italy 2485; SNG ANS 651 ff. var. (pellet controls other locations); SNG Mn 15481; SNG Cop 1932 var. (obv. ivy), Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, attractive toning, bumps and marks, minor scratches on reverse, weight 0.621 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, die axis 90o, Rhegion mint, c. 445 - 435 B.C.; obverse facing lion scalp mask, no control marks; reverse REGI within olive wreath tied to the left, possibly a pellet with the top half of the R(?); a beautiful little gem!; $250.00 (212.50)


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 445 - 435 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Rhegion reached great artistic and cultural heights. It was home to academies, such as the Pythagorean School, and to well-known poets, historians and sculptors such Ibycus, Ippy, and Pythagoras. It was an important ally of the Roman Republic. Rhegium flourished during the Imperial Age but was devastated by several major earthquakes and tsunami. St. Paul passed through Rhegium on his final voyage to Rome (Acts XXVIII:13).
GI86589. Silver litra, Herzfelder pl. IV, Bα; HN Italy 2485; BMC Italy p. 375, 21 (ivy leaf); SNG Cop 1932 var. (ivy leaf l.); Weber 1118 var. (olive leaf rev.), Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, dark glossy toning, weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rhegion mint, c. 445 - 435 B.C.; obverse facing lion scalp mask, olive leaf (control symbol) lower right; reverse RECI within olive wreath tied to the left, no control marks; a beautiful little gem!; scarce; $200.00 (170.00)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI76945. Bronze litra, Calciati II p. 287, 150 Ds 14 Rs 63; BMC Sicily p. 196, 391; SNG ANS 740; SNG Cop 767; HGC 2 1465 var. (R1, 4th Democracy, different controls), aEF, dark sea-green patina, light marks, small spots of light corrosion, flan with ragged edge splits, weight 8.501 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 315o, Syracuse mint, 305 - 295 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of young Herakles left, wearing taenia, star (control symbol) behind neck; reverse lion walking right, right foreleg raised, club right above, arrow right (control symbol) in exergue; $195.00 (165.75)


Marion, Cyprus, Stasiakos II, c. 330 - 312 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Stasiakos II, king of Marion, was deposed in 312 B.C. by Ptolemy I and the city of Marion was destroyed. This extremely rare type was apparently unpublished until 1998. Coin Archives lists only one sale of this type in the past two decades.
GB87141. Bronze AE 20, Destrooper 16; Bank of Cyprus 10; Symeonides 63 ff., cf. Tziambazis 57 (AE16, lion head facing), SNG Cop -, BMC Cyprus -, VF, rough, weight 7.634 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, Marion mint, c. 330 - 312 B.C.; obverse round shield ornamented with laurel wreath; reverse MAPIEYΣ (below), lion head left; extremely rare; $175.00 (148.75)


Leontini, Sicily, c. 455 - 430 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Leontini was founded as by colonists from Naxos in 729 B.C., itself a Chalcidian colony established five years earlier. It was the only significant Greek settlement in Sicily not located on the coast, being some 6 miles inland. The site, originally held by the Sicels, was seized by the Greeks owing to its command of the fertile plain to the north. The city was reduced to subject status in 498 B.C. by Hippocrates of Gela, and in 476 B.C. Hieron of Syracuse moved the inhabitants from Catania and Naxos to Leontini. This coin was struck during a period of independence during which Leontini sought the support of Athens against Syracuse. In part, this request led to Athens' failed Sicilian Expeditions, after which Athens declined. Leontini was again made subject to Syracuse in 415 B.C.
GI86593. Silver litra, SNG Munchen 567 (same dies); Boehringer Leontini 58; SNG ANS 264; SNG Cop 356; SNG Lloyd 1069; BMC Sicily p. 91, 46; HGC 2 692 (R2); SNG Tubingen -, VF, attractive style, dark toning, some roughness, weight 0.658 g, maximum diameter 13.0 mm, die axis 180o, Leontini mint, c. 455 - 430 B.C.; obverse VEO-N (V is upside down Λ), head of roaring lion right; reverse Apollo (or river god Lissos?) standing left, nude, pouring libations from phiale over altar in right hand, laurel branch in left hand, barley kernel right; very rare; $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00 ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III - Lysimachos, 323 - 280 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
 
GS87444. Silver drachm, Price 2702, Mller Alexander 347, SNG Munchen 645, SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, light earthen deposits, obverse very slightly off center, bumps and marks, die wear, small lamination defect on reverse, weight 4.262 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain western Anatolia mint, 323 - 280 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aetophoros seated left on backless throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, facing lion's head (control) left, NI (control) beneath seat above strut, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Agora Auctions, auction 74 (5 Jun 2018), lot 12; extremely rare, this is the first example handled by Forum, this coin is the only specimen of the type on Coin Archives, and there are only two specimens on Pella; $150.00 (127.50)


Julia Domna, Augusta, 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Cybele, called mother of the gods, was originally Anatolian mother goddess. In Rome, Cybele was known as Magna Mater ("Great Mother"). Roman mythographers reinvented her as a Trojan goddess, and thus an ancestral goddess of the Roman people by way of the Trojan prince Aeneas. With Rome's eventual hegemony over the Mediterranean world, Romanised forms of Cybele's cults spread throughout the Roman Empire.
RS85214. Silver denarius, RIC IV C382 (S); BMCRE V p. 432, 14; RSC III 137; SRCV II 7401, Choice gVF, bold well centered strike, light toning, weight 3.517 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, reign of Caracalla, 211 - 215 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, flat coil at back of head, looped plait from ear and on neck; reverse MATRI DEVM, Cybele standing facing, legs crossed, leaning with left arm resting on a column, head left, towered and veiled, drum in right hand, long scepter resting against left arm, lion left at feet half visible from behind legs to left; scarce; $140.00 (119.00)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
These very small fractions always weigh less than the theoretical weight for the denomination. They were often struck significantly below the theoretical weight. Wear, corrosion and porosity have usually further reduced the weight over time. They may even weigh less than half their theoretical weight. Assigning the denomination during attribution is often speculative.
GA85721. Silver obol, SNG BnF 378; SNG Cop 48; SNG Kayhan 55; BMC Mysia p. 35, 118; Von Fritze II 11, gVF, sharp detail, lightly etched surfaces, earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 0.798 g, maximum diameter 11.7 mm, die axis 270o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, reversed E on side, tunny fish upwards behind (tunny off flan); reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; $135.00 (114.75)


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 415 - 387 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Rhegion reached great artistic and cultural heights. It was home to academies, such as the Pythagorean School, and to well-known poets, historians and sculptors such Ibycus, Ippy, and Pythagoras. It was an important ally of the Roman Republic. Rhegium flourished during the Imperial Age but was devastated by several major earthquakes and tsunami. St. Paul passed through Rhegium on his final voyage to Rome (Acts XXVIII:13).
GS79976. Silver litra, SNG Cop 1936; SNG ANS 670; SNG Mnchen 1588; SNG Tb 536; HN Italy 2495; BMC Italy p. 376, 30, VF, well centered, nice style, uneven toning, light corrosion, weight 0.722 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 90o, Rhegion mint, c. 415 - 387 B.C.; obverse facing lion scalp mask; reverse olive sprig with two olives, PH between the leaves; $125.00 (106.25)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 19, 2018.
Page created in 1.14 seconds.
Lions