Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Mar 19, 2017
Greek Coins

Mar 13, 2017
Byzantine Coins
Asian Coins

Mar 10, 2017

Mar 09, 2017
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Recent AdditionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Recent Additions

Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL84184. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 132 (R3), Bastien XIII 101, Cohen VII 6, Hunter V 25 var. (laureate and cuirassed, no drapery), SRCV IV 16734 var. (same), Choice gVF, excellent centering, weight 3.446 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; ϖερψ ραρε τηισ βυστ; $120.00 (€106.80)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RB84425. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 992, BMCRE IV 1385, Szaivert MIR 18 206, Cohen II 127, SRCV II 4966, aF, nice portrait, well centered, weight 28.977 g, maximum diameter 32.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 171 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXV, laureate head right; reverse COS III (consul 3 times), Mars advancing right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied at waist and flying behind, spear in right hand, trophy across left shoulder in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking his knees; $130.00 (€115.70)


Celtic, Ring Money, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
CE84814. Bronze Ring Money, large plain ring, cf. Victoor I - 1b, Alvarez-Burgos P15, F, rough green patina, weight 17.399 g, maximum diameter 42.7 mm, $45.00 (€40.05)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
This is the first and only known specimen of a new type combining two dies published in H-H-J Nicopolis. The obverse is a die match to H-H-J Nicopolis 8.22.6.3, struck for Geta. The reverse is a die match to a contemporary type struck for his brother Caracalla, H-H-J Nicopolis 8.18.14.29. It is a new discovery but not completely unexpected because parallel issues for members of the imperial family were normal at Nikopolis.
RP84573. Bronze AE 18, Unpublished, confirmed as a new type by J. Hoeft;, VF, green patina, nice style, part of obverse legend weak, tight flan, scratches, weight 3.149 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 225o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, Middle May - 8 June 218 A.D.; obverse Λ AVP KΛ - ΓETAC, bare-head, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC IC, head of bearded Herakles right, protruding chin; extremely rare; $120.00 (€106.80)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101 - 106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town reached its peak during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty.
BB83890. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.9.27 (R2), AMNG I/I 1371, Moushmov 920, Varbanov I 2526 (R4) corr. (obv. leg), SNG Cop -, F, green patina in fields with coppery types and legends, rough, tight and slightly ragged flan, weight 1.361 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV KAI CE - CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOPC IC, head of bearded Herakles right, protruding chin; extremely rare; $120.00 (€106.80)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101 - 106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town reached its peak during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty.
BB83890. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.9.27 (R2), AMNG I/I 1371, Moushmov 920, Varbanov I 2526 (R4) corr. (obv. leg), SNG Cop -, F, green patina in fields with coppery types and legends, rough, tight and slightly ragged flan, weight 1.361 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV KAI CE - CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOPhead of bearded Herakles right, protruding chin; extremely rare; $120.00 (€106.80)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101 - 106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town reached its peak during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty.
BB83890. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.9.27 (R2), AMNG I/I 1371, Moushmov 920, Varbanov I 2526 (R4) corr. (obv. leg), SNG Cop -, F, green patina in fields with coppery types and legends, rough, tight and slightly ragged flan, weight 1.361 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AV KAI CE - CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOPOΛIT-ΩN ΠPOC IC, Nike standing left, leaning with left forearm on a waist-high column, wreath downward in right hand, palm frond in left hand and cradled in left arm; $19.00 (€16.91)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
The reverse legend translates:
YΠ = Consular Legate (Governor)
NOBIOY POYΦOY = Nobius Rufus
NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC ICTPΩ = (coin) of the citizenry of Nicopolis on the Istrus (Danube)

The governor's full name was Tiberius Flavius Novius Rufus, he is also known from inscriptions.
RP84565. Bronze AE 27, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.26.6.5 (R3), Varbanov I 4058 (R3), AMNG I/I 1901, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, green patina, die break on obverse at beginning of legend, some flatness of strike, weight 12.513 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, cos. legate Ti. Flavius Novius Rufus, 218 - 222; obverse AVK M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse YΠ NOBIOY POUΦ-OY - NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I,CTP-ON (last five leters in divided line across field), Serapis standing facing, kalathos on head, raising right hand, long scepter in left; ex Agora Auctions, sale 53, lot 70; $90.00 (€80.10)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS64702. Silver antoninianus, Göbl MIR 31d; RIC V, part 1, 125; RSC IV 230, Hunter IV 14, SRCV III 9985, VF, weak centers, weight 3.053 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1st emission, 253 - 254 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Victory standing left, wreath extended in right hand, palm frond in left hand; $40.00 (€35.60)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victoria or Nike, the Winged Goddess of Victory, personifies victory. She was described variously in different myths as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal). Nike and her siblings were close companions of Zeus. According to classical (later) myth, Styx brought them to Zeus when the god was assembling allies for the Titan War. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer, a role in which she often is portrayed in Classical Greek art. Nike flew around battlefields rewarding the victors with glory and fame, symbolized by a wreath of laurel leaves.
RS64703. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 31d; RIC V, part 1, 125; RSC IV 230, Hunter IV 14, SRCV III 9985, VF, toned, portrait a little weak, reverse just slightly off center, weight 3.599 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1st emission, 253 - 254 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Victory standing left, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; $35.00 (€31.15)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 256 A.D., the cities in the Roman Empire begin to build walls as the defense of the frontiers collapsed. The Goths invaded Asia Minor, Dacia was lost, and they appeared at the walls of Thessalonica. The Franks crossed the Rhine. The Alamanni penetrated to Milan. In Africa, the Berbers massacred Roman colonists. King Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia and Syria and plundered Antioch, Zeugma, and Dura-Europos.
RS90039. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1687e (Samosata), SRCV III 9995, RIC V 293 (Antioch), RSC IV 276 (Antioch), Hunter IV 76, VF, well centered, toned, porous, weight 3.566 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Syria mint, 255 - 258 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Valerian and Gallienus standing confronted; Valerian on left, scepter in right hand, globe in left hand; Gallienus on right offering Victory to Valerian, transverse spear in left hand; $38.00 (€33.82)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victoria or Nike, the Winged Goddess of Victory, personifies victory. She was described variously in different myths as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal). Nike and her siblings were close companions of Zeus. According to classical (later) myth, Styx brought them to Zeus when the god was assembling allies for the Titan War. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer, a role in which she often is portrayed in Classical Greek art. Nike flew around battlefields rewarding the victors with glory and fame, symbolized by a wreath of laurel leaves.
RS90050. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 77c, RIC V 127 (S), RSC III 221, SRCV III 9984, Hunter IV - (p. xxiv), F, toned, die wear, slightly tight flan cutting off some tops of legends, weight 2.936 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 255 - 256 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Victory standing half left, resting right hand on grounded shield, palm frond in left hand; scarce; $30.00 (€26.70)




  







Catalog current as of Monday, March 27, 2017.
Page created in 2.324 seconds
FORUM ANCIENT COINS