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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Hephaestus or Vulcan||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hephaestus or Vulcan

Blacksmith to the Gods; god of fire and the forge. Son of Zeus and Hera or, according to some traditions, of Hera alone.


Lipara, Islands off Sicily, c. 412 - 408 B.C.

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This very rare type should not be confused with the later, lighter, issue with the pellets arranged in two rows of three.
SH73170. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati I p. 14, 16; BMC Sicily p. 259, 33; SNG Cop -; SNG Mnchen -; HGC 2 -, VF, green patina, irregular flan, light corrosion, weight 12.076 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 0o, Lipara mint, c. 412 - 408 B.C.; obverse young Hephaistos seated right on draped chair, nude, hammer in right hand, kantharos in left; reverse ΛIΠAPAIΩN, ethnic around a circle of six pellets; very rare; SOLD


Lipara, Islands off Sicily, c. 350 B.C.

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"Sing, clear voiced Muse, of Hephaistos, renowned for his inventive skill, who with grey-eyed Athene, taught to men upon earth arts of great splendor, men who in former days lived like wild beasts in mountain caves. But having learned skills from Hephaestus, famed for his work and craftsmanship, they now, free from care, peacefully live year by year in their houses. Be gracious, Hephaestus, and grant me excellence and prosperity!" -- Homeric Hymn to Hephaestus
GI28724. Bronze hemilitron, Lindgren II 638 (this coin); Calciati I, 13, 12; SNG Cop 1095; SNG Mnchen 673; SNG ANS -, F, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 45o, Lipara mint, c. 350 B.C.; obverse Hephaistos seated right on folding chair, nude, hammer in right hand, kantharos(?) in left; reverse ΛIΠAPAI−ΩN, dolphin leaping over waves left; Lindgren plate coin; rare; SOLD


Aesernia, Samnium, Italy, c. 263 - 240 B.C.

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Aesernia, a Samnite city, received a Roman colony in 264 B.C. It remained faithful to Rome through the Second Punic War. During the Social War it resisted the confederates until it was forced, by famine after a protracted siege, to surrender. Aesernia became for a time the headquarters of the Italic League. After Sulla defeated the Samnites, Aesernia was so severely punished for its defection that it was utterly deserted. Recovery was slow but by the time of Trajan and the Antonines Aesernia was again an important town.
GB71303. Bronze AE 22, HN Italy 430, SNG Cop 256, SNG Mnchen 111, SNG ANS 118, Sambon 187, Campana CNAI 4, SGCV I 536, F, weight 6.438 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 90o, Aesernia (Isernia, Italy) mint, c. 263 - 240 B.C.; obverse VOLCANOM, head of Vulcan left, wearing laureate pileus, tongs behind; reverse AISERNINO, Jupiter driving biga right, Nike above flying right crowing horses; rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Lucius Aurelius Cotta, 105 B.C.

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Vulcan is the divinity of the forge and therefore symbolic of the striking of money.
RR13698. Silver denarius serratus, Crawford 314/1b, Sydenham 577, RSC I Aurelia 21, SRCV I 191 var. (control), aVF, weight 3.767 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, obverse draped bust of Vulcan right, wearing a laureate pileus, tongs and X behind, A below chin, all within myrtle wreath; reverse eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head left, L COT below, all within a laurel wreath; SOLD


Roman Republic, Lucius Caesius, 112 - 111 B.C.

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An Egyptian papyrus of 112 B.C. issues instructions to a local official in the Fayum for the visit of a Roman senator, Lucius Memmius. He was apparently visiting for pleasure, to see the sights, and was to receive a reception similar to that which would be given to a great dignitary of the kingdom. Everything was to be ready for his entertainment, including food for the sacred crocodiles. It is an incidental light upon the subservience to members of the Roman elite which it was now thought politic to show in the Ptolemaic Kingdom.
RR58546. Silver denarius, Crawford 298/1, Sydenham 564, RSC I Caesia 1, BMCRR Italy 585, RBW Collection 1140, SRCV I 175, VF, toned, weight 3.809 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 112 - 111 B.C.; obverse bust of Vejovis left, viewed from behind, wearing a taenia and a cloak over his left shoulder, hurling a thunderbolt with his right hand, ROMA monogram right; reverse the two Lares Praestites seated right, each holds long scepter in left hand, dog between them, head of Vulcan facing left and tongs above, LA (ligate) left, PRE (ligate) right, LCSI in exergue; SOLD


Aesernia, Samnium, Italy, c. 263 - 240 B.C.

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Aesernia, a Samnite city, received a Roman colony in 264 B.C. It remained faithful to Rome through the Second Punic War. During the Social War it resisted the confederates until it was forced, by famine after a protracted siege, to surrender. Aesernia became for a time the headquarters of the Italic League. After Sulla defeated the Samnites, Aesernia was so severely punished for its defection that it was utterly deserted. Recovery was slow but by the time of Trajan and the Antonines Aesernia was again an important town.
GI72626. Bronze AE 21, HN Italy 430, SNG Cop 256, SNG Mnchen 111, SNG ANS 118, Sambon 187, Campana CNAI 4, SGCV I 536, VF, open flan splits, weight 8.389 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Aesernia (Isernia, Italy) mint, c. 263 - 240 B.C.; obverse VOLCANOM, head of Vulcan left, wearing laureate pileus, tongs behind; reverse AISERNINO, Jupiter galloping a biga right, Nike above flying right crowing horses; rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Lucius Aurelius Cotta, 105 B.C., Brockage

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Vulcan is the divinity of the forge and therefore symbolic of the striking of money.
RR84598. Silver denarius serratus, Crawford 314/1b, Sydenham 577a, RSC I Aurelia 21b, SRCV I 191, F / VF, weight 3.737 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 105 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Vulcan right, O (control symbol), wearing a laureate pileus, X above tongs behind, all within myrtle wreath; reverse incuse of the obverse; SOLD


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Vulcan is the Roman god of fire, including the fire of volcanoes. Vulcan is often depicted with a blacksmith's hammer. The festival of Vulcan, the Vulcanalia was celebrated on 23 August each year, when the summer heat placed crops and granaries at the greatest risk of burning. The Romans identified Vulcan with the Greek smith-god Hephaestus, and he became associated like his Greek counterpart with the constructive use of fire in metalworking.
RS64594. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 884d, RIC V-1 5, Hunter IV 56, SRCV V 9934, RSC IV 50d var. (no cuirass), VF, oblong flan with crack, weight 2.330 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 2nd emission, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse DEO VOLKANO, Vulcan standing left within hexastyle temple, hammer raised in right hand, tongs downward in left, no anvil; scarce; SOLD


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Vulcan is the Roman god of fire, including the fire of volcanoes. Vulcan is often depicted with a blacksmith's hammer. The festival of Vulcan, the Vulcanalia was celebrated on 23 August each year, when the summer heat placed crops and granaries at the greatest risk of burning. The Romans identified Vulcan with the Greek smith-god Hephaestus, and he became associated like his Greek counterpart with the constructive use of fire in metalworking.
RS68412. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 884d, RIC V-1 5, Hunter IV 56, SRCV V 9934, RSC IV 50d var. (no cuirass), aEF, centered, toned, weight 3.462 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 2nd emission, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse DEO VOLKANO, Vulcan standing left within hexastyle temple, hammer raised in right hand, tongs downward in left, no anvil; rare; SOLD


Malaka, Spain, 250 - 200 B.C.

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Malaka (today Mlaga in Andalusia, Spain) was founded by Phoenicians from Tyre, c. 770 B.C. The name was likely derived from the Phoenician word for salt referring to salting of fish near the harbor. Malaka came under Carthaginian and then Roman rule. Malaca (the city's Latin name) flourished under Roman rule. A Roman theater was constructed. Malaca fell to the Visigoths but was recovered by Byzantine Empire 550 - 621.
GB62941. Bronze half unit, SNG BM Spain 385, Villaronga-Benages 794 (R9), F, over-cleaned, weight 4.130 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Malaka mint, obverse head of Vulcan right, wearing conical cap, tongs and neo-punic 'mlk' behind; reverse tetrastyle temple; extremely rare; SOLD




  




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Hephaestus or Vulcan