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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Ares or Mars||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ares or Mars

God of war and bloodshed. Symbols include the boar and the spear. Son of Zeus and Hera.


Persian Empire, Tarkumuwa (Datames), Satrap of Cilicia & Cappadocia, c. 384 - 362 B.C., Tarsus, Cilicia

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Datames' enemies in Artaxerxes' court accused him, perhaps falsely, of intending to revolt against the Great King. Secretly warned, he then did, in fact, revolt, c. 370 B.C. The revolt appeared to be leading to a breakup of the entire western half of the empire into autonomous states. His own son's desertion to Artaxerxes was, however, the beginning of the end, which came when Datames was assassinated, c. 362 B.C.
GS91502. Silver stater, Moysey p. 42, 2d and pl. 2, 17; SNG Cop 275; cf. SNG BnF 276; SNG Levante 80; SNGvA 5935; SNG Berry 1297; Sunrise 50, aEF, much mint luster, light toning, attractive style, obverse die wear, reverse off center, weight 10.739 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 380 - 373 B.C.; obverse female head facing slightly left, wearing earring and necklace; reverse Aramaic legend on left: TRDMW (Tarkumuwa), bearded and helmeted male head (Ares?) left, wearing crested Athenian helmet; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $400.00 (352.00) ON RESERVE


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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In 231, Severus Alexander accompanied his mother Julia Mamaea to Syria and campaigned against the Persians. Military command rested in the hands of his generals, but his presence gave additional weight to the empire's policy. The Romans were defeated and withdrew to Syria. After heavy losses on both sides, a truce was signed accepting the status quo. In 233, Alexander celebrated a triumph in Rome to commemorate his "victory."
RB89054. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 635, BMCRE VI 843, Cohen IV 163, Hunter III 163, SRCV II 7979, VF, dark patina, centered on an oval flan, small edge cracks, slight double strike, weight 20.911 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 231 - 235 A.D.; obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate,draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARS VLTOR (Mars the avenger), Mars advancing right in military garb, spear transverse in right hand, shield in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; ex John Jencek; $180.00 (158.40)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RB91586. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 778; Cohen II 751; BMCRE IV p. 275, 1705; Hunter II -, SRCV II -, VF, attractive style, well centered, porosity, light corrosion, weight 23.607 g, maximum diameter 30.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 145 - 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse Mars advancing right, nude but for helmet and cloak tied in belt around waist, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left hand over left shoulder, S - C (senatus consulto) divided across field below center; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $150.00 (132.00)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS91589. Silver denarius, RIC IV 88; RSC III 431; BMCRE V p. 265, 542; SRCV II 6862; cf. Hunter III 29 (TR P VIIII), Choice aEF, excellent style, old cabinet tone, well centered, flow lines, edge cracks, weight 3.073 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 207 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right; reverse PONTIF TR P X COS II (priest, holder of Tribunitian power for ten years, consul for the 2nd time), Mars advancing right, nude except for helmet and cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $140.00 (123.20)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS91592. Silver denarius, RSC III 208a, BMCRE VI 27, Hunter III 5, RIC IV 7, cf. SRCV 7890 (Antioch, star rev. field), gVF, attractive old collection toning, flow lines, off center, light marks, edge cracks, weight 2.499 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P COS P P, Mars standing facing, head left, olive branch in extended right hand, reversed spear in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $120.00 (105.60)


Persian Empire, Tarsos, Cilicia, Time of Satraps Datames or Pharnabazos, c. 380 - 361 B.C.

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Datames' enemies in Artaxerxes' court accused him, perhaps falsely, of intending to revolt against the Great King. Secretly warned, he then did, in fact, revolt, c. 370 B.C. The revolt appeared to be leading to a breakup of the entire western half of the empire into autonomous states. His own son's desertion to Artaxerxes was, however, the beginning of the end, which came when Datames was assassinated, c. 362 B.C.
SH91744. Silver obol, cf. SNG BnF 303, SNG Levante 89 (monogram behind Ares), Gktrk 21 (dolphins flanking female), SNG Cop 273, Choice VF, well centered, dark toning, attractive style, earthen encrustations, weight 0.533 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 270o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 380 - 361 B.C.; obverse female head (nymph?) facing slightly left, wearing earring and necklace; reverse bearded and helmeted male head (Ares?) left, wearing crested Attic style helmet, ear flaps raised, Aramaic HLK (Cilicia) upper left; $120.00 (105.60)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RA73268. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 844 (S), Webb 940, Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, aF, well centered, nice green patina, weight 3.971 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain British mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate and draped bust right, early reign "moustache" portrait; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars walking right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, no field marks, nothing in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $110.00 (96.80)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS92483. Silver denarius, RIC IV 223; RSC III 150; BMCRE V p. 372, 87; Hunter III 14; SRCV II 6819, Choice VF, superb portrait, flow lines, light marks, uneven toning on reverse, edge cracks and splits, weight 3.259 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 213 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate, bearded head right; reverse MARTI PROPVGNATORI (to Mars the defender), Mars advancing left in helmet and military garb, transverse spear in right hand, trophy in left hand over left shoulder; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 (96.80)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RL87890. Billon follis, RIC VII 80 (R2), SRCV IV 15984, Cohen VII 345, Hunter V 49 var. (2nd officina), Choice VF, dark patina, well centered and struck, die wear, weight 3.222 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, autumn 307 - end of 308 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARTI CONSERVATORI (Mars the Protector), Mars standing right, wearing military garb, inverted spear in right hand, left hand on grounded shield, A left, S right, PTR in exergue; ex Beast Coins, ex Harlan Berk (CICF April 2013); $105.00 (92.40)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS89765. Silver denarius, RIC III 349, RSC II 926, BMCRE IV 664, Hunter II 69, SRCV II -, F, well centered, light toning, light marks, small darker spots, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.191 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Dec 175 - Dec 176 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS AVG GERM SARM, laureate head right; reverse TR P XXX IMP VIII COS III, Mars advancing right, nude but for helmet and cloak tied on belt, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of arms in left hand over left shoulder; $100.00 (88.00)




  



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Ares or Mars