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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Zeus or Jupiter||View Options:  |  |  |   

Zeus or Jupiter

King of the Gods and ruler of Mount Olympus; god of the sky, and thunder. Youngest son of the Titans Kronus and Rhea. Symbols are the lightning bolt and the eagle.


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D., with Licinius II Caesar

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SH35421. Billon follis, Bastien, NC 1973, pp. 87 - 97, VF, weight 3.590 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 330o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 317 or 318 A.D.; obverse DD NN IOVII LICINII INVICT AVG ET CAES (Domini Nostri Iovii Licinii Invicti Augustus et Caesar), confronted busts of Licinius I and II, holding trophy of arms between them; reverse I O M ET VIRTVTI DD NN AVG ET CAES (Iovi Optimo Maximo Virtuti Domini Nostri Augustus et Caesar), Jupiter standing facing to the right of trophy of captured arms with two bound captives at base, Jupiter nude except for cloak over shoulder and holds long scepter in left hand, SMATS in exergue; extremely rare; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

This interesting, but damaged, gold aureus, the highest denomination in circulation and the equivalent of 25 silver denarii, dates from the very end of AD 144. This is indicated by the inscription DES IIII which is a continuation of the obverse legend. It records the emperor's designation to a fourth consulship which was taken up on January 1st, AD 145, and was the final consulship held by Antoninus.
SH56304. Gold aureus, RIC III 119a (citing Numismatische Zeitschrift 1881, p. 183; BMCRE IV p. 72 * and note (citing Trau sale, lot 1435); Cohen -; Hill 615; SRCV II -, VF, cuts and edge marks, weight 7.456 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, very end of 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse DES IIII, Jupiter seated left on a facing throne, thunderbolt in right, long scepter vertical in left; ex Ponterio & Associates, NYINC, 8-9 Jan 2010, sale 152, lot 5950; very rare; SOLD


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

This interesting, but damaged, gold aureus, the highest denomination in circulation and the equivalent of 25 silver denarii, dates from the very end of AD 144. This is indicated by the inscription DES IIII which is a continuation of the obverse legend. It records the emperor's designation to a fourth consulship which was taken up on January 1st, AD 145, and was the final consulship held by Antoninus.
SH59732. Gold aureus, RIC III 119a (citing Numismatische Zeitschrift 1881, p. 183; BMCRE IV p. 72 * and note (citing Trau sale, lot 1435); Hill Undated 615; Cohen -; SRCV I, VF, cuts and edge marks, weight 7.456 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, very end of 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate bust right, very slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse DES IIII, Jupiter seated left on a facing throne, thunderbolt in right, long scepter vertical in left; ex Ponterio & Associates, NYINC, 8-9 Jan 2010, sale 152, lot 5950; very rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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In 65 A.D., Nero killed his pregnant wife, Poppea Sabina, with a kick to the stomach. He also appeared in a stage performance shocking the senatorial class.
SH62358. Gold aureus, RIC I 52 (R), BMCRE I 67, BnF I 213, Calico 412, Cohen I 118, McDowall Nero 25, SRCV I 1930, gF, ex jewelry, scratches, weight 7.025 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 65 - 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse IVPPITER CVSTOS (Jupiter the Preserver), Jupiter seated left on throne without back, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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In the year AD 65/6 two new types make their first appearance on the gold and silver coins of Nero, Jupiter Custos- “Guardian”, and Salus- “Well-Being” (of the emperor). Both confer divine protection on Nero, who had survived the most potent threat to his rule since he succeeded Claudius in AD 54. The Pisonian Conspiracy got its name from G. Calpurnius Piso, a wealthy and flamboyant senator who was being put forward as an alternative emperor by a cabal of senior military officers and government potentates who feared for their positions and lives under the increasingly erratic Nero. The plot was discovered, a number of prominent Romans were executed, and others, such as the political philosopher Seneca, the poet Lucan and the satirical writer Petronius were forced to commit suicide. The emperor gave thanks to the gods for his salvation, but his fate was only delayed for a few years.
SH65968. Gold aureus, RIC I 63 (R), Calico 413, BMCRE I 77, BnF I 231, Cohen I 120, McDowall Nero 30, SRCV I -, VF, some minor nicks and earthen encrustation, weight 7.224 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse IVPPITER CVSTOS (Jupiter the Preserver), Jupiter seated on throne left, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; SOLD


Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, 225 - 215 B.C.

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Crawford describes obverse as the laureate janiform head of the Dioscuri and explains, "the Dioscuri had acquired the role of protectors of the Roman people as a result of their intervention on the Roman side at the Battle of Lake Regillus. Explaining the reverse, he states, "Jupiter was the god in whose honour a Roman triumph was held." The depiction is probably based on the statue of Jupiter in a quadriga erected on the ridge of the Capitoline Temple in 296 B.C.
SH76566. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 28/3, Sydenham 64, RSC I 23, SRCV I 31, Choice gVF, attractive style, well struck, light rose toning, traces of mint luster, small die crack on chin, minor flan flaws and contact marks, weight 6.800 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander IV, c. 316 - 311 B.C.

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Susa, the Biblical Shushan, is one of man's oldest cities. People were living at the acropolis by 5000 B.C. and urban structures date from about 4000 B.C. Susa was the capital of Elam and a favorite residence of the Persian king Darius I the Great. Seleucus I annexed Susa to his province c. 311 B.C. A Parthian winter capital, Trajan captured it, making it the easternmost point of the Roman Empire at its apex. He was, however, soon forced to withdraw. In 1218, the city was completely destroyed by invading Mongols. The modern town of Shush, Iran is located at the site of ancient Susa.

Struck under Aspeisas, satrap of Susiana, c. 316 - 311 B.C.
SH31090. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3857, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, EF, nice-style, well centered, sharp, and fantastic sculptural high-relief, weight 17.182 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 225o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, Aspeisas, satrap of Susiana, c. 316 - 311 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand wreath left, AI (above strut) over PΠ monogram under throne; scarce; SOLD


Baktria, Diodotus I as Satrap for Antiochus II Theos, c. 255 - 250 B.C.

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Diodotus I was the Seleukid governor of Baktro-Sogdiana early in Antiochos II's reign. His first coinage was issued with the Seleukid monarch's portrait. He then issued coins, like this one, with his own portrait, yet retaining the name of Antiochos as king. Diodotus' territory was so remote that he was king in all but title. About 250 B.C., he took the title too and issued coins as king in his own name (BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆IO∆OTOY).

Recent scholarship shows that Ai Khanoum (Greek name uncertain) was the principal mint of the region, located on the frontier between Afghanistan and the former Soviet Union.
SH42566. Gold stater, Houghton-Lorber I 630, Newell ESM 723, SGCV II 7497, VF, test cut on obverse, weight 8.380 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ai Khanoum mint, obverse diademed head of middle-aged Diodotus I right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Zeus striding left, naked, aegis over extended left arm, hurling fulmen with raised right, wreath over eagle inner left; rare; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck after Alexander's death, under either Perdikkas or Antipater, regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
SH86161. Silver tetradrachm, Price 113, Müller Alexander 224, Troxell issue H3, SNG Cop 682, SNG München 275, SNG Alpha Bank 503, SNG Delepierre 986, Choice EF, attractive archaic style, bold well centered strike, high relief, light toning, weight 17.283 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 322 - 320 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Macedonian helmet (control symbol) left; Classical Numismatic Group auction 105 (10 May 2017), lot 78; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 46 (11 Sep 2016), lot 105 (realized €1,900 plus fees); SOLD


Persian Achaemenid Empire, Carian Satrapy, Pixodarus, c. 340 - 335 B.C.

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Lustrous, with light rosy iridescence. A spectacular coin struck from dies of finest style on a broad flan.
SH27863. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 597; SNGvA 2375; SNG Keckman 280; SNG Kayhan 891; SNG Lockett 2913; BMC Caria p. 185, 5 ff.; Weber 6608; SGCV II 4966, Choice EF, weight 6.914 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Halikarnassos (Bodrum, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 335 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo facing slightly right; reverse ΠIΞΩ∆APOY, Zeus Labraundos standing right holding scepter and double-axe; SOLD




  




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Zeus or Jupiter