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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Provenance ▸ Collections ▸ Jyrki Muona CollectionView Options:  |  |  | 

The Jyrki Muona Collection of Roman Coins

We are pleased to offer a large selection from the Jyrki Muona Collection of Roman Coins. While the collection includes a wide spectrum of emperors and types, the primary focus of the collection is on the emperor Otho and the emperor Philip and his family. Mr. Muona's coins include many rarities and many attractive high grade examples. We hope you find that elusive coin you have been seeking for your collection!


Antonia, Daughter of Mark Antony, Wife of Nero Drusus, Mother of Claudius, Grandmother of Caligula

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Antonia was the daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, the wife of Nero Drusus, the mother of Claudius, and a grandmother of Caligula. Renowned for her beauty and virtue, Antonia was revered by the Roman people. She was probably poisoned by Caligula or committed suicide. She never loved her son Claudius, calling him a monster and a fool, but he posthumously made her Augusta in 41 A.D. and issued all her coinage.
SH68887. Silver denarius, RIC I Claudius 66, BMCRE I Claudius 111, Cohen 2, SRCV I 1900, F, toned, weight 3.717 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, struck under Claudius, c. 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse ANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing barley wreath; reverse CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI (consistency of the emperor), Antonia standing facing, draped as Constantia, long torch in right, cornucopia in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; rare (R2); $880.00 (783.20)


Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.

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This coin is M13 in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage: From the Reform of Nero to the Reform of Trajan by Kevin Butcher and Matthew Pointing. Testing established this coin was minted to the first Neronian standard, at 78.6% silver. There is a very tiny hole drilled in the edge where the sample was taken.
SH72993. Silver denarius, Butcher-Pointing M13 (this coin), RIC I 105 (R), RSC II 47, BMCRE I 31, BnF III 67, Hunter I 11, SRCV I 2198 var. (no AVG, May - Jul), F, toned, tiny sample hole on the edge, weight 3.093 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, Jul - 20 Dec 69 A.D.; obverse A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS RESTITVTA (Liberty restored), Libertas standing facing, head right, pileus in extended right hand, long rod vertical in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; rare; $400.00 (356.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS75697. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 75A (R); RSC IV 130, SRCV III 8945, Hunter III -, EF, superb strike with sharp dies, nice metal, weight 4.966 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P IIII COS P P (high priest, tribune of the people for four years, consul, father of the country), Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $350.00 (311.50)


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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The officina is an interesting notation of five, using U instead of the usual V or E. This notation only became common on Byzantine coins, at a much later date. RIC 163 also records officina six for the type, written in Latin, VI. MER-RIC lists this type as sixth officina (UI).
SH77276. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3449, RIC V 163, BnF XII 1704, Venra 1928 - 1949, SRCV III 11812, Choice EF, excellent portrait, well centered, near full silvering, weight 4.052 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 345o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 2nd emission, early-mid 276 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRIT PERP (everlasting security), Securitas standing left, raising right hand to head, resting left elbow on column, U in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $180.00 (160.20)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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This type may commemorate a victory on the Sea of Galilee during the recapture of Judaea.
RB68879. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 335; BMCRE II 617; Cohen I 632; Hunter I 119 var. (S - C, low across field); SRCV I -, F, well centered, nice green patina, small areas of corrosion on obv, weight 12.620 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head right; reverse VICTORIA NAVALIS (the naval victory), Victory standing right on a prow, wreath in right hand, palm frond over should in left, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $160.00 (142.40)


Roman Republic, C. Coelius Caldus, 51 B.C.

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The obverse depicts the moneyer's grandfather, also Caius Coelius Caldus, consul in 94 B.C., and the first in his family to obtain high office. Prior to his term as consul, in 107 B.C., he was a tribune of the plebs and passed a lex tabellaria, requiring a secret ballot to determine the verdict in cases of high treason. He was a praetor in 100 or 99 B.C., and proconsul of Hispania Citerior the following year. Later, during Sulla's second civil war, he tried to help Gaius Marius the Younger by preventing Pompey from joining his forces to Sulla, but failed.

The reverse honors the moneyer's father and uncle. His father was a Epulo Jovis, one of the septemviri Epulones, the college of seven priests responsible for banquets and sacrifices given in honor of Jove and the other gods. His uncle was an imperator, augur and decemvir, Imperator, Augur, Decemvir (sacris faciundis), commander for military forces, a priest-soothsayer, and one of a body of ten Roman magistrates responsible for management of the Games of Apollo, and the Secular Games. The moneyer's name and title are in the exergue.
RS72975. Silver denarius, Crawford 437/2a, Sydenham 894, RSC I Coelia 7, BMCRR II 3837, SRCV I 404, Choice aF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.623 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 51 B.C.; obverse C COEL CALDVS downwards on right, COS below, head of Coelius Caldus right, standard inscribed HIS (Hispania) behind, standard in the form of a boar (emblem of of Clunia, Hispania) before; reverse C CALDVS downward on left, IMP A X (Imperator, Augur, Decemvir) in four lines on right, CALDVS III VIR (ALD ligate, triumvir) below, statue of god seated left between two trophies of arms, all on a high lectisternium with front inscribed L CALDVS VI VIR EPVL (VIR and VL ligate, Lucius Caldus Septemvir Epulo); from the Jyrki Muona Collection; scarce; $140.00 (124.60)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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From the extensive series commemorating the Secular Games held in Autumn of 88 A.D.
RS77275. Silver denarius, RIC II 596, RSC II 76, BnF III 120, BMCRE II 131, SRCV I 2723, VF, centered, toned, die wear, marks, weight 3.206 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 14 Sep - 31 Dec 88 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII, laureate head right; reverse COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC, herald wearing feathered cap, advancing left, wand in right, shield decorated with helmeted bust of Minerva on left arm; $125.00 (111.25)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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This coin was dedicated to Gallienus' good relations with the army. Gallienus eventually fell out of harmony with his guard and officers. He was ambushed and murdered by his own men. The future emperors Claudius Gothicus and Aurelian were likely both involved in the conspiracy leading to his assassination.
SH77278. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 15u, RIC V J132, RSC IV 131a, SRCV III 10190, Hunter IV J3, Choice VF, excellent portrait, good metal, well centered, ragged flan, flatly struck centers, weight 3.700 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 254 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse CONCORDIAE EXERCIT (Harmony with the army), Concordia standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, double cornucopia in left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $115.00 (102.35)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." This coin was struck to ask Fortuna to ensure Vespasian returned safely to Roma from the war in Judaea. The portrait resembles Vitellius because the mint had not yet received a Vespasian portrait and the die engraver modified Vitellius' portrait based on a verbal description.
RS77279. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 19; RSC II 84; BMCRE II 7; BnF III 7; Cohen I 84 (2f.); SRCV I -, F, toned, damaged area on top of obverse and bottom of reverse, weight 2.622 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. Jan - Jun 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head (resembling Vitellius) right; reverse COS ITER FORT RED, Fortuna standing left, resting right hand on prow at feet on left, cornucopia in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; scarce; $100.00 (89.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Syria and Egypt. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. It appears, however, she kept her wheel. She just hid it under her seat.
RB68877. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 513, Cohen III 153, BMCRE 618, SRCV II 5746, gF, nice green patina, weight 22.316 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 188 A.D.; obverse M COMMODVS ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XIII IMP VIII COS V P P (hight priest, tribune of the people 13 years, imperator the 8th time, consul the 5th time, father of the country), Fortuna seated left, rudder on globe in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, wheel under seat, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, FOR RED in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $60.00 (53.40)







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Catalog current as of Thursday, May 25, 2017.
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Muona Collection