Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Hanukkah Sameach!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Merry Christmas!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |History| ▸ |Alexander the Great||View Options:  |  |  |   

Alexander the Great

In a few seconds you will be automatically redirected to the Alexander the Great page of our shop. Click here if you are not redirected.

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |c.| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander
||tetradrachm|
Struck after Alexander's death, under either Perdikkas or Antipater, regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
GS96454. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3038, Müller Alexander 199, Newell Tarsos 43, Demanhur 2345 - 2348, gVF, beautiful style, toned, bumps and marks, porosity, off center but on a very broad flan, weight 17.011 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 180o, Cilicia, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΣEΩΣ clockwise above, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long lotus tipped scepter vertical behind in left hand, Nike flying right raising wreath (control) lower left, monogram (control) under throne; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Lysimachos,| |305| |-| |281| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|
Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
GS96966. Silver tetradrachm, Marinescu Issue 27 (unpublished thesis), Thompson -, Müller -, SNG Cop -, Mektepini -, Meydancikkale -, gVF, well centered and struck, light toning, bumps scratches, some porosity, small edge chip, weight 16.581 g, maximum diameter 29.7 mm, die axis 0o, western Anatolia, uncertain mint, 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena enthroned left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, Nike crowning name in right hand, left arm rests on shield, transverse spear against right side, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXOY (Lysimachos) downward on left, monogram inner left; ex Savoca Numismatik auction 21 (11 Mar 2018), lot 79; rare; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Lysimachos,| |305| |-| |281| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|
Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
GS96970. Silver tetradrachm, Müller 460, Thompson -, SNG Cop -, SNG UK -, VF, sculptural high relief, toned, broken and repaired (crack visible above Alexander's head), weight 16.675 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, posthumous, c. 281 - 200 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, Nike crowning name in extended right hand, left arm rests on grounded round shield decorated with Gorgoneion, transverse spear against right side, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXOY (Lysimachos) downward on left, bow case (control symbol) inner left; ex FORVM (2012); ex Heritage Long Beach Signature Sale (18 Sep 2008), lot 20015; SOLD


Aspendos, Pamphylia, 196 - 195 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Aspendos|, |Aspendos,| |Pamphylia,| |196| |-| |195| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|
After Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king. Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own envoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city. The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms - they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4,000 horses annually.

When this coin was struck, Antiochos III the Great had recovered central Asia Minor for the Seleukid Kingdom. Aspendos accepted Seleukid authority in 197 B.C. The city surrendered to Rome in 190 B.C.
SH59440. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2896, Müller Alexander 1209, Cohen DCA 312, aVF, weight 16.160 g, maximum diameter 30.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aspendos mint, 196 - 195 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΣ / IZ (year 17 Era of Aspendos) left; Seleukid countermark on right: anchor in a; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

|Countermarked|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |II| |Philadelphos,| |285| |-| |246| |B.C.||tritartemorion|
CM95812. Bronze tritartemorion, cf. Lorber CPE B227, Svoronos 451; countermark apparently unpublished, coin: Fair, nice green patina, marks, encrustations, closed crack, beveled obverse edge, central cavities; countermark: gF+, weight 9.064 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 267 - 259 B.C.; obverse bust of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin headdress; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wings open, E(?) between legs; countermark: shaped punch of helmeted bust of Athena right; ex Zeus Numismatics auction 5 (15 Mar 2020), lot 1105; no other examples of this countermark are known to FORVM, it is possibly unique; ON LAYAWAY


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
With the arrival of Alexander the Great, Teos gained its freedom from Persian rule. In 319 B.C., it came under the rule of the Strategos of Asia, Antigonus I Monophthalmos (the one-eyed). Antigonus declared himself King in 306. In 302 B.C., Troas fell to Lysimachus' general, Prepelaos. Lysimachus moved some of Troas' citizens to the newly built city of Ephesus.
SL79268. Silver drachm, Price 2279, Müller Alexander 290, SNG Cop 880, SNG Munchen 595, SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC XF, strike 5/5, surface 2/5, edge chip, Alexander III, early posthumous issue (5770405-004), weight 4.220 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Teos (near Sigacik, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, griffin seated left raising right foreleg over monogram in lower left field, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; the larger photo was taken before certification, the coin is now in an NGC holder; NGC| Lookup; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 282 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |I| |Soter,| |305| |-| |282| |B.C.||obol|
Cyprus became part of Alexander the Great's empire when he defeated Persia. After the succession struggles between Alexander's generals, Cyprus was ruled by the Ptolemies of Egypt.
GP96077. Bronze obol, Lorber CPE B110a; Svoronos 363; BMC Ptolemies p. 14, 7; Mionnet VI 229; Weiser 8; Noeske 107; Cox Curium 69; Malter 55; SNG Milan 12; SNG Cop -, VF, nice green patina, high points not fully struck, die damage reverse upper right, weight 7.099 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Cypriot Salamis(?) mint, c. 294 - 285 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant scalp headdress; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings partially open, EY over (XAP monogram) left; SOLD


Koinon of Macedonia, Reigns of Elagabalus - Gordian III, c. 218 - 244 A.D., Alexander and Bucephalus

|Koinon| |of| |Macedonia|, |Koinon| |of| |Macedonia,| |Reigns| |of| |Elagabalus| |-| |Gordian| |III,| |c.| |218| |-| |244| |A.D.,| |Alexander| |and| |Bucephalus||AE| |26|
Plutarch tells the story of how, in 344 B.C. Philonicus the Thessalian, a horse dealer, offered a massive wild stallion to Alexander's father, King Philip II. Since no one could tame the animal, Philip was not interested. Alexander, however, seeing that the horse was afraid of his own shadow, promised to pay for the horse himself should he fail to tame it. He was given a chance and surprised all by subduing it. Alexander spoke soothingly to the horse and turned it towards the sun so that it could no longer see its shadow. Eventually, Bucephalus allowed Alexander to ride him. Embarrassed, Philip commented, "O my son, look thee out a kingdom equal to and worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee." Alexander named the horse Bucephalus because the horse's head seemed "as broad as a bull's." Bucephalus died of battle wounds in 326 B.C., in Alexander's last battle. Alexander founded the city of Bucephala (thought to be the modern town of Jhelum, Pakistan) in memory of his wonderful horse.
RP96104. Bronze AE 26, BMC Macedonia p. 23, 106; AMNG III-1 p. 123, 482; RPC Online -; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Sarglos -, VF, bumps, porosity, obverse slightly off center, flan flaw (pit) center obverse, weight 10.747 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 180o, Beroea (Verria, Greece) mint, c. 231 - 235 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, as Herakles, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse KOI MAKE∆ONΩN B NEΩ KO, Alexander galloping his horse Bucephalus right, wearing military garb, cloak fluttering behind, spear in right hand, reins in left hand, no symbol below; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades; rare variety; SOLD


Aigeai, Cilicia, c. 47 - 27 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Aigeai,| |Cilicia,| |c.| |47| |-| |27| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Aegeae (also spelled Aigai, Aegaeae, Aigaiai, Aegae, or Aigeai) was a Greek town with a port on the coast of ancient Cilicia, on the north side of the Bay of Issus. It is now separated from the outlet of the Pyramus River (the modern Ceyhan) by a long narrow estuary called Gulf of Alexandretta. In 47 B.C., Julius Caesar, during his stay in Tarsus, reorganized Cilicia. Aegeae was pro-Caesarian and demonstrating their support began a new town era in that same year. Under Rome Aegeae was a place of some importance. It was Christianised at an early date.
GB82848. Bronze AE 19, Bloesch 245 ff. (5 spec.); SNG Levante 1685; SNGvA 5444; BMC Lycaonia p. 22, 18; SNG BnF -, VF, nice green patina, weight 4.890 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Aigeai (near Yumurtalik, Turkey) mint, 34 - 33 B.C. (if year 14); obverse diademed head of king (Alexander the Great?) right; reverse Nike advancing left, wreath extended in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, AIΓE/AIΩN in two lines in the left field, MH right (magistrate initials?), ∆I (year 14 or magistrate initials?) lower left; SOLD


Koinon of Macedonia, Reign of Gordian III or Philip I, 244 A.D.

|Koinon| |of| |Macedonia|, |Koinon| |of| |Macedonia,| |Reign| |of| |Gordian| |III| |or| |Philip| |I,| |244| |A.D.||AE| |27|
The Macedonian Koinon (community) was the political organization governing the autonomous Roman province of Macedonia and was responsible for issuing coinage. The individual cities, as members of the Koinon, sent representatives to participate in popular assembly several times each year. The high point of the year was celebrations and games in honor of Alexander the Great and the Roman emperor held in Beroea (modern Verria), located about 75 km. west of Thessaloniki. This was the provincial center of the emperor cult, with the appropriate temple and privileges, first granted to the Koinon by Nerva. The title Neokoros, or "temple guardians" was highly prized and thus advertised on coins. Under Elagabalus, the Koinon received a second neokorie, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek). The title was rescinded but later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
RP96947. Bronze AE 27, AMNG III-1 864, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunter -, SNG Saroglos -, SNG Bar -, BMC Macedonia -, Lindgren -, F, nice green patina, a bit rough, slightly off center, weight 11.362 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 90o, Beroea (Verria, Greece) mint, games issue, 244 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, head of Alexander the Great right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with a griffin running right; reverse KOIN MAKE B NEΩ BEP-AIΩE, Emperor standing left, extending right hand to prize table before him, short scepter in left hand, two prize crowns on the table each containing a palm frond, urn on a tall column in the background on the far side of the table, EOC (year 275 of the Actian Era) across field; very rare; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Thursday, December 3, 2020.
Page created in 0.531 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity