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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Geography| ▸ |France||View Options:  |  |  | 

France (Mints and Types)

This theme includes Celtic, Greek, Roman and later coins struck at mints in France and coins related to historical events which took place in France. Coins struck at mints in France during the Constantinian Era and Late Roman Period are very popular with collectors because they are often the most interesting and attractive coins of the period.

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||sestertius|
A decursio was a military exercise, by which Roman soldiers were taught to make long marches in a given time, under arms and without quitting their ranks. They sometimes consisted of a mock fight between two divisions. Augustus and subsequently Hadrian ordered that the infantry and cavalry were to march out three times a month ten miles from the camp and ten miles back, fully armed and equipped. Decursio on this coin probably refers Nero's participation in mock military maneuvers in the circus.
SH96390. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 508, Mac Dowall WCN 448, BMCRE I 316, BnF II 135, Cohen I 88, SRCV I -, Choice aEF/VF, superb portrait, well centered and struck, scratches, marks, porosity more on the reverse, weight 23.971 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 66 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVG PONT MAX TR POT P P, laureate head left, small globe at point; reverse DECVRSIO (in exergue), Nero and a companion on horseback prancing right, Nero holds spear in right hand, companion holds vexillum in right over shoulder, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $2400.00 (€2208.00)
 


Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

|Numerian|, |Numerian,| |February| |or| |March| |283| |-| |October| |or| |November| |284| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Consular busts are scarce for this dynasty.
RA93244. Billon antoninianus, Bastien 562 (3 spec. cited), RIC V-2 -, Cohen VI -, SRCV III -, Hunter V -, La Venèra -, Choice aVF, well centered, flow lines, tiny encrustations, scattered light porosity, weight 3.080 g, maximum diameter 22.85 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 6th emission, c. 284 A.D.; obverse IMP C NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate bust wearing imperial mantle right, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars advancing right, nude except for helmet and cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand, C in right field; very rare; $420.00 (€386.40)
 


France, Louis XV the Beloved, 1715 - 1774

|France|, |France,| |Louis| |XV| |the| |Beloved,| |1715| |-| |1774||Ecu|
France took 20 Sols de Navarre coins minted in 1719 and 1720, re-struck them as Sixth Ecu de France (between the years of 1720 and 1723) essentially creating a coin worth 1 livre. These re-struck coins, however, were eventually assigned the value of 18 Sols.
WO93952. Silver Ecu, SCWC KM 512.12, Duplessy 1680, Ciani 2122, Lafaurie 698, VF, nicely toned, weight 28.866 g, maximum diameter 41.5 mm, die axis 180o, Bayonne mint, 1771; obverse LVD•XV•D•G•FR•ET•NAV•REX (Louis XV, by the Grace of God, king of France and Navarre), young portrait left, laureate, two flowers (privy mark) below; reverse •SIT•NOMEN•DOMIN•BENEDICTVM*1771• (May the name of the Lord be blessed), crowned arms of France, crowned oval shield with three lis, surrounded by oak wreath; $360.00 (€331.20)
 


France, John II the Good, 1350 - 1364 A.D.

|France|, |France,| |John| |II| |the| |Good,| |1350| |-| |1364| |A.D.||Gros| |à| |la| |couronne|NEW
When John II the Good (French: Jean le Bon) came to power, France faced many disasters: the Black Death killed nearly half its population, there were popular revolts, unemployed mercenaries plundered the country, and losses to the English, including the Battle of Poitiers of 1356, in which John was captured. While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles had to suppress several rebellions. To liberate his father, in 1360 Charles concluded the Treaty of Brétigny, by which France surrendered territory and promised to pay an enormous ransom. In an exchange of hostages, including his son Louis, John was released from captivity to raise funds for his ransom. Upon his return in France, he created the franc to stabilize the currency. John tried to get rid of the mercenaries by sending them on a crusade, but Pope Innocent VI died shortly before their planned meeting in Avignon. After his son Louis escaped from captivity, John shocked and dismayed his people by announcing that for "good faith and honor" he would voluntarily return to captivity in England. John was greeted in London in 1364 with parades and feasts, however, a few months after his arrival he fell ill with an unknown malady and died. His body was returned to France, where he was interred in the royal chambers at Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son Charles V.
ME95905. Silver Gros à la couronne, Duplessy 305, Ciani 397, Roberts 2624, Lafaurie I 308, F, toning, weight 3.705 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 300o, 22 Aug - 30 Oct 1358; obverse outer legend: + BNDICTV: SIT: nOmE: DnI: nRI: DEI: IhV: XPI (the name of our Lord Jesus Christ be blessed), inner legend: + IOhAnnES DEI : GRA (John by the Grace of God, two flowers legend break); cross fleury, base dividing inner legend; reverse crown, FRANCO / RV : REX in two lines below crown (three pellet within annulet inscription break), border of twelve lis within annulets; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; $340.00 (€312.80)
 


Lot of 2 Coins, England, Edward I Longshanks, 1272 - 1307

|England|, |Lot| |of| |2| |Coins,| |England,| |Edward| |I| |Longshanks,| |1272| |-| |1307||denier| |au| |leopard|NEW
Elias identifies this type as probably the "moneta nova" of the currency reform of 1291, and perhaps struck until 1294. The Bordeaux mint closed in 1294 due to war activity and did not reopen until 1305.

Known as Edward Longshanks for his height of 6 ft. 2 in., and sometimes as the "Hammer of the Scots." Edward was ruthless in pursuing his aims and crushing those who opposed him. He conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeding in doing the same to Scotland.
ME95904. Silver denier au leopard, Elias 18, Duplessy Féodales 1042, Poey d'Avant 2775, SCBC-SII 8018; 0.793 and 0.931g, 18.7mm, F-gF, both coins, Burdigala (Bordeaux, France) mint, c. 1291 - 1294; obverse + EDVARDVS REX (King Edward), leopard passant left above upper horizontal line, AGL (England) between two horizontal lines, E below lower horizontal line, all within inner circle; reverse + DVX AQIT BVRD (Duke of Aquitaine, Burdigala), cross pattée, within inner circle, E in the upper left (1st) quarter; $190.00 (€174.80)
 


Anglo-Gallic, Henry VI de Lancastre, King of France and England, 1422 - 1453

|France|, |Anglo-Gallic,| |Henry| |VI| |de| |Lancastre,| |King| |of| |France| |and| |England,| |1422| |-| |1453||petit| |blanc|
Henry VI was King of England from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453. The only child of Henry V, he succeeded to the English throne at the age of nine months upon his father's death, and succeeded to the French throne on the death of his grandfather, Charles VI, shortly afterwards. He is the only English monarch to also have been crowned King of France, as Henry II, in 1431.
ME95906. Silver petit blanc, Elias 297a (R), SCBC-SII 8167, Duplessy I 446, Ciani 603, Lafaurie 450, leopard mintmark, aVF, dark toning, ink catalog marking on reverse, weight 1.260 g, maximum diameter 22.4270 mm, die axis 270o, Rouen mint, 1423 - 1449; obverse (leopard) HEN-RICVS: - REX (King Henry, triple pellet stop), shields of France (on left) and England (on right), side by side; reverse (leopard) SIT: nOmE: DnI: BEHEDICV' (Blessed be the name of the Lord, triple pellet stops), Latin cross, h left, R right; rare; $190.00 (€174.80)
 


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Rouen (Latin: Rotomagus) is a city on the River Seine in the north of France. It is the capital of the region of Normandy. Formerly one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, Rouen was the seat of the Exchequer of Normandy during the Middle Ages. It was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties, which ruled both England and large parts of modern France from the 11th to the 15th centuries.
RA73288. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 736, RIC V-2 662 (R), Carausian Hoard 72, SRCV IV 13715 var. (legends), Hunter IV -, King Unmarked -, Bicester -, gF, green patina, earthen encrustations, some corrosion, weight 5.197 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 225o, Rotomagus (Rouen, France) mint, mid 286 - early summer 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing half left, from patera in her right hand, feeding snake rising from the left side of a column altar at her feet, cornucopia in left hand, nothing in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73475. Billon antoninianus, Beaujard and Huvelin 36, Webb Carausius 739, RIC V-2 666 (R), Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, F, well centered on a tight flan, over-cleaned, porous, ragged edge, closed flan crack, weight 2.673 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 225o, Rotomagus (Rouen, France) mint, 2nd emission, c. 1st half 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, continental portrait type; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing slightly left, head left, from patera in right hand feeding snake rising from altar, cornucopia in left hand, no mintmarks; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


France, Feudal, County of Penthièvre, Etienne I, 1093 - 1138

|France|, |France,| |Feudal,| |County| |of| |Penthièvre,| |Etienne| |I,| |1093| |-| |1138||denier|
Etienne or Stephen of Penthièvre, Count of Tréguier, 3rd Lord of Richmond was a Breton noble and a younger son of Odo, Count of Penthièvre and Agnes of Cornouaille, sister of Hoël II, Duke of Brittany. In 1093, he succeeded to the title of Count of Tréguier; in 1098, he succeeded his brother Alain as Lord of Richmond in Yorkshire, England. Penthievre is a county in northern Brittany, a cultural region in the west of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica during the period of Roman occupation. It became an independent kingdom and then a duchy before being united with the Kingdom of France in 1532.
ME92073. Billon denier, Duplessy Féodales 364; Poey d'Avant pl. XXVII, 5; Roberts 4953, VF, toned, small deposits, weight 0.825 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 120o, Penthievre mint, 1093 - 1138; obverse + STEPhAN COO), cross pattée cantoned with two stars; reverse + GVING AMP:, head right (deformed); $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA87258. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 Lugdunum 408 (S), Bastien Lyon XI 613 pl. XLIII (5 ex.), Cohen VI 436 var. (helmeted), Hunter IV - (p. clxxxvii), SRCV IV -, gVF, well centered and struck, traces if silvering, porous, weight 3.497 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, emission 12, series 2, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, A in exergue; scarce; $60.00 (€55.20)
 







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