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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Lycaonia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Lycaonia

Lycaonia was a large region in the interior of Anatolia, north of Mount Taurus, bounded on the east by Cappadocia, on the north by Galatia, on the west by Phrygia and Pisidia, and on the south by Cilicia and in the Byzantine period Isauria; but its boundaries varied greatly at different times. The Lycaonians appear to have been in early times to a great extent independent of the Persian empire, and were like their neighbors the Isaurians a wild and lawless race of freebooters; but their country was traversed by one of the great natural lines of high road through Asia Minor, from Sardis and Ephesus to the Cilician gates, and a few considerable towns grew up along or near this line. After the defeat of Antiochus the Great, Lycaonia was given by the Romans to King Eumenes II of Pergamon. About 160 BC, part of Lycaonia was added to Galatia; and in 129 BC the eastern half was given to Cappadocia. Its administration and grouping changed often under the Romans. In Acts 14:6 Paul, after leaving Iconium, crossed the frontier and came to Lystra in Lycaonia. The mention of the Lycaonian language in the Acts of the Apostles (14:11) shows that the native language was spoken by the common people at Lystra even in 50 A.D.; and probably it was only later and under Christian influence that Greek took its place. In 371, Lycaonia was first formed into a separate Roman province. The ancient coinage of Lycaonia is quite limited. Judging from the number of types and known issues, coins appear to have been struck sporadically and perhaps mostly for prestige or important occasions.


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Savatra, Lycaonia

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Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, strategic warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill. She was believed to lead soldiers into battle as the war goddess Athena Promachos. The Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis was dedicated to her, along with numerous other temples and monuments across Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
RP57208. Bronze AE 20, SNGvA supp. 8652 (same dies); vA Lycaoniens 184 ff., BMC Lycaonia p. 12, 1; RPC Online 7256; SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, gVF, weight 5.350 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Savatra mint, obverse AYT KAI A∆P ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CAOYATPEΩN, Athena standing left, spear and shield in left, right hand over thymiaterion; rare city; SOLD


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Dalisandus, Lycaonia

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The first ever coin from Dalisandus handled by Forum!
RP57192. Bronze AE 29, SNG BnF 2262, BMC Lycaonia p. 3, 2, gF, weight 20.035 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 180o, Dalisandos mint, obverse AYK M IOY ΦIΛIΠΠON CEBA, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ∆AΛICAN∆EΩN KOINON, Herakles standing facing, head right, right resting on club, lion's skin over left, ΛY - K / OA in field; very rare city!; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Iconium, Lycaonia

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Iconium, Lycaonia, is modern Konya, Turkey. Under Claudius the name was changed to Claudiconium.

Lycaonia was bounded on the west by Pisidia, on the north by Galatia, on the east by Cappadocia, and on the south by the mountainous country of Isauria or Cilicia Tracheia.

RP83131. Bronze AE 20, RPC II 1608, SNGvA 286 - 289, VF, weight 5.417 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium (Konya, Turkey) mint, obverse TITOC KAICAP AVTOKPAT, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse KΛAY∆EIKONIEΩN, head of Perseus right, wearing Phrygian cap, harpa behind; rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Iconium, Lycaonia

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Iconium, Lycaonia, is modern Konya, Turkey. Under Claudius the name was changed to Claudiconium.

The region known by the name of Lycaonia was bounded on the west by Pisidia, on the north by Galatia, on the east by Cappadocia, and on the south by the mountainous country of Isauria or Cilicia Tracheia.
RP82506. Bronze AE 21, RPC I 3545, VF, weight 6.119 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium (Konya, Turkey) mint, obverse NEPWN KAICAP CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse KΛAY∆EIKONIEWN, head of Perseus right, wearing Phrygian cap, harpa across shoulder; SOLD


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Parlais, Lycaonia

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Luna, the Greek moon-goddess, was female, which seems natural because the female menstrual cycle follows the lunar month. But Mn was a male moon-god, probably originally of the indigenous non-Greek Karian people. By Roman times Mn was worshiped across Anatolia and in Attica. He was associated with fertility, healing, and punishment. Mn is usually depicted with a crescent moon behind his shoulders, wearing a Phrygian cap, and holding a lance or sword in one hand and a pine-cone or patera in the other. His other attributes include the bucranium and chicken. A temple of Mn has been excavated at Antioch, Pisidia.
RP82586. Bronze AE 21, SNGvA 5137; Lindgren 1386 var. (bust left); SNG BnF 1678 var. (same); SNG Cop 14 var. (same), nice gVF, weight 5.484 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, Lykaonia, Parlais mint, obverse IVLIA DOMNA, draped bust right; reverse IVL AVG COL PARLAIS, Mn standing right in long robes and Phrygian cap, crescent moon behind shoulders, left foot on bucranium, pine cone extended in left hand, vertical spear in right; attractive patina and style; SOLD


Iconium, Lycaonia, 1st Century B.C.

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GB81650. Bronze AE 15, BMC Lycaonia p. 4, 1, VF, weight 2.681 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium (Konya, Turkey) mint, obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse EIKONIEWN, Perseus, nude, standing left, in right harpe, in left head of Gorgon; rare; SOLD


Anatolia (Uncertain City), c. 400 B.C.

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GA82013. Silver obol, cf. SNG Keckman II 340, VF, weight 0.570 g, maximum diameter 8.8 mm, uncertain mint, obverse facing panther head; reverse quadripartite incuse square; SOLD


Laranda, Lycaonia, c. 324 - 323 B.C.

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GS35726. Silver obol, Gktrk 68; SNG Levante -; SNG BnF -; SNGvA -, VF, weight 0.612 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 0o, obverse facing head of Herakles, club over shoulder, H left; reverse wolf forepart right, star in left field; ex Harlan Berk; rare; SOLD


Laranda, Lycaonia, 4th Century B.C.

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The arrowhead on the reverse is not described in SNG Levante but on the plate it appears to be present on the edge of the coin. The referenced Coin Galleries coin is from different dies but has an arrowhead under the wolf forepart.
GA63048. Silver obol, SNG Levante 225 (uncertain Cilicia, arrowhead not described but possibly on plate); Coin Galleries auction July 2011, lot 1029; SNG BnF -, aVF, weight 0.411 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 145o, Laranda (Karaman, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse Baal seated left, stalk of grain and bunch of grapes in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; reverse wolf forepart right, crescent above with horns upward, arrowhead below, circle border of dots; scarce variety; SOLD


Iconion, Lycaonia, 1st Century B.C.

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According to the Acts of the Apostles, Paul and Barnabas preached in Iconium during their First Missionary Journey in about 47 - 48 A.D., having been persecuted in Antioch, and Paul and Silas probably visited it again during Paul's Second Missionary Journey in about 50. Their visit to the synagogue of the Jews in Iconium divided the Jewish and non-Jewish communities between those who believed Paul and Barnabas' message and those who did not believe, provoking a disturbance during which attempts were made to stone the apostles. They fled to Lystra and Derbe, cities of Lycaonia. This experience is also mentioned in the Second Letter to Timothy.
GB86873. Bronze AE 19, vA Lykaoniens 195, SNG BnF 2270 corr. (same rev. die), SNG Tb 4512, SNG Cop 2 var. (magistrate), SNGvA 5384 var. (same), BMC Lycaonia -, F, dark patina, porous, weight 5.974 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Iconion (Konya, Turkey) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse bust of Perseus right, wearing winged and griffin-crested helmet, harpa and head of Medusa over left shoulder; reverse Zeus seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, thunderbolt in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, EIKONIEΩN downward on right; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES

Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des mdailles. (Paris, 1898).
Gktrk, M.T. "Small coins from Cilicia and surroundings" in MIMAA.
Hill, G.F. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia. (London, 1900).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Mnzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, etc. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Mdailles, Bibliothque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (Zurich,1986).
Troxell, H. A. & J. H. Kagin. ?Cilicians and Neighbors in Miniature? in Kraay-Mrkholm Essays.
von Aulock, H., ed. Mnzen und Stdte Lycaoniens. (Tbingen, 1976).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 23, 2019.
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Lycaonia