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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ LycaoniaView Options:  |  |  | 

Lycaonia

Lycaonia was a large region in the interior of Anatolia, north of Mount Taurus, bounded on the east by Cappadocia, on the north by Galatia, on the west by Phrygia and Pisidia, and on the south by Cilicia and in the Byzantine period Isauria; but its boundaries varied greatly at different times. The Lycaonians appear to have been in early times to a great extent independent of the Persian empire, and were like their neighbors the Isaurians a wild and lawless race of freebooters; but their country was traversed by one of the great natural lines of high road through Asia Minor, from Sardis and Ephesus to the Cilician gates, and a few considerable towns grew up along or near this line. After the defeat of Antiochus the Great, Lycaonia was given by the Romans to King Eumenes II of Pergamon. About 160 BC, part of Lycaonia was added to Galatia; and in 129 BC the eastern half was given to Cappadocia. Its administration and grouping changed often under the Romans. In Acts 14:6 Paul, after leaving Iconium, crossed the frontier and came to Lystra in Lycaonia. The mention of the Lycaonian language in the Acts of the Apostles (14:11) shows that the native language was spoken by the common people at Lystra even in 50 A.D.; and probably it was only later and under Christian influence that Greek took its place. In 371, Lycaonia was first formed into a separate Roman province. The ancient coinage of Lycaonia is quite limited. Judging from the number of types and known issues, coins appear to have been struck sporadically and perhaps mostly for prestige or important occasions.


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Savatra, Lycaonia

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SH57231. Bronze AE 26, SNG BnF 2331 (same dies); vA Lycaoniens 177; SNG Cop 16; BMC Lycaonia p. 12, 2; SNGvA 5406; RPC Online -, VF, weight 11.428 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Savatra mint, obverse AYT KAIX A∆P ANTΩNINOC CE, laureate head right; reverse CAOYATPEΩN, uncertain male deity standing left, ears of grain in right, long reed in left, fish at feet left; rare city; $110.00 (€97.90)
 


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Iconium, Lycaonia

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Iconium, Lycaonia, is modern Konya, Turkey. Under Claudius the name was changed to Claudiconium.

Lycaonia was bounded on the west by Pisidia, on the north by Galatia, on the east by Cappadocia, and on the south by the mountainous country of Isauria or Cilicia Tracheia.

RP83131. Bronze AE 20, RPC II 1608, SNGvA 286 - 289, VF, weight 5.417 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium mint, obverse TITOC KAICAP AVTOKPAT, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse KΛAY∆EIKONIEΩN, head of Perseus right, wearing Phrygian cap, harpa behind; rare; SOLD


Iconium, Lycaonia, 1st Century B.C.

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GB81650. Bronze AE 15, BMC Lycaonia p. 4, 1, VF, weight 2.681 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium mint, obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse EIKONIEWN, Perseus, nude, standing left, in right harpe, in left head of Gorgon; rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des médailles. (Paris, 1898).
Göktürk, M.T. "Small coins from Cilicia and surroundings" in MIMAA.
Hill, G.F. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia. (London, 1900).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, etc. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (Zurich,1986).
Troxell, H. A. & J. H. Kagin. ?Cilicians and Neighbors in Miniature? in Kraay-Mørkholm Essays.
von Aulock, H., ed. Münzen und Städte Lycaoniens. (Tübingen, 1976).

Catalog current as of Friday, September 22, 2017.
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Lycaonia