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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Orbs or GlobesView Options:  |  |  |   

Orbs and Globes on Ancient Coins

Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RA91193. Silvered antoninianus, MER-RIC 4105 (17 spec.), RIC V-1 210, BnF XII 1827, Hunter IV 71, Venra -, Choice EF, full silvering, full border centering, nice portrait, weight 4.455 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 3, Jan - Jun 276 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CLEMENTIA TEMP (time of peace and calm), Emperor (on left) standing right, holding eagle tipped scepter, receiving globe from Jupiter, Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, long scepter vertical in left hand, H in center, XXI in exergue; $220.00 (193.60)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RS88417. Silver denarius, RIC IV 23, RSC III 144, BMCRE V 102, Hunter III 25, SRCV II 7531, EF, excellent portrait, reverse slightly off center, edge cracks, weight 3.043 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, late 219 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PM T R P II COS II P P, Providentia standing facing, head left, legs crossed, leaning with left arm on column, rod in right hand held over globe at feet, cornucopia in left hand; $180.00 (158.40)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

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In 230 A.D., Severus Alexander made Thessaly a separate province from Macedonia. He increased taxes in order to maintain the war against the Sassanids and strengthened the defenses of the Roman Empire.
RS89483. Silver denarius, RSC III 401, RIC IV 105a, BMCRE VI 616, SRCV II 7911, Hunter III 55 var. (slight drapery), Choice EF, excellent portrait, light tone, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.546 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 15o, Rome mint, 230 A.D.; obverse IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate head right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse P M TR P VIIII COS III P P, emperor standing right in military dress, laureate, transverse spear in right hand, globe in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73, part of lot 970; $180.00 (158.40)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 19 Dec 324, Licinius abdicated his position as Emperor. He was pardoned by Constantine I as a result of the supplication of his wife Constantia (who was Constantine's half-sister) and banished to Thessalonica as a private citizen. The next year Licinius was executed on the charge of conspiring, and raising troops against the emperor.
RL87875. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII London 250, Cohen VII 27, SRCV IV 16725, Hunter V 4 var. (bust), EF, some luster, attractive portrait, tight flan, some reverse die wear, weight 3.385 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Londinium (London, England) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOBIL C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding shield and spear with point forward; reverse BEAT TRANQLITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, F-B across fields, three stars above, PLON in exergue; ex Pegasi Numismatics, ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (88.00)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Balkerne Gate Colchester
RA73257. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 416, RIC V-2 358, Cohen VII 261, SRCV IV 13681 var. (S-C), Hunter IV 122 var. (same), VF, green patina, well centered, bumps, marks and scratches, weight 3.224 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, late reign tetrarchic portrait type; reverse PROVID AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, S - P flanking across field at center, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $90.00 (79.20)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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In 316, Constantine I sent his half-brother Julius Constantius to Licinius at Sirmium (Pannonia), with a proposal to make Bassianus caesar with power over Italy. Licinius refused, elevated Valerius Valens to augustus, mobilized an army against Constantine, and executed Bassianus. Constantine I defeated Licinius and Valerius Valens at the Battle of Mardia (near Harmanli, Bulgaria).
RL88036. Billon follis, RIC VII Trier 135, SRCV IV 16063, Cohen VII 525, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, excellent centering, black tone with some coppery high spots, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 317 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand turned outward, T - F divided across fields, ATR in exergue; $90.00 (79.20)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RB89533. Copper as, RIC II 1229 (R), Lyon 88 var. (same), BMCRE II -, BnF III -, Hunter I -, Cohen I -, SRCV I -, F, well centered, Tiber patina, areas of porosity and corrosion, part of reverse legend weak, weight 8.714 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P, laureate head left; reverse AEQVITAS AVGVSTI (equity of the emperor), Aequitas standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across lower half of field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $90.00 (79.20)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally, it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS87916. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 213, RSC IV 167, Hunter III 167, SRCV III 8626, Choice VF, well centered on a broad flan, light marks, some die wear, small edge cracks, weight 4.077 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 30o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 242 - 244 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ORIENS AVG (the rising sun of the Emperor), Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left; ex Beast Coins; $85.00 (74.80)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL84258. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, traces of silvering, attractive nice surfaces, nearly as struck, weight 3.186 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $80.00 (70.40)


Gratian, 24 August 367 - 25 August 383 A.D.

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Gratian was Roman emperor from 367 to 383. The eldest son of Valentinian I, Gratian accompanied, during his youth, his father on several campaigns along the Rhine and Danube frontiers. Upon the death of Valentinian in 375, Gratian's brother Valentinian II was declared emperor by his father's soldiers. In 378, Gratian's generals won a decisive victory over the Lentienses, a branch of the Alamanni, at the Battle of Argentovaria. Gratian subsequently led a campaign across the Rhine, the last emperor to do so, and attacked the Lentienses, forcing the tribe to surrender. That same year, his uncle Valens was killed in the Battle of Adrianople against the Goths making Gratian essentially ruler of the entire Roman Empire. He favoured Christianity over traditional Roman religion, refusing the divine attributes of the Emperors and removing the Altar of Victory from the Roman Senate.
RL87982. Bronze maiorina, Hunter V 25 (also 3rd officina), RIC IX Arelate 20(a)3, LRBC II 548, SRCV V 20005, Cohen VIII 30, VF, dark patina with buff earthen highlighting, light marks and scratches, tiny edge splits, weight 4.911 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Constantina-Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, c. 379 - 25 August 383 A.D.; obverse D N GRATIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse REPARATIO REIPVB, emperor standing facing, head left, right hand raising kneeling turreted woman, Victory on globe offering wreath in his left hand, TCON in exergue; ex Harlan Berk 2002; $80.00 (70.40)




  



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Orbs & Globes