Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Travels of Saint Paul||View Options:  |  |  |   

Travels of Saint Paul

St. Paul's various journeys, occurring from about 35 A.D. to around 67 A.D., took him through a wide array of cities in regions of Syria and Asia Minor. During these journeys his life was affected by major political figures such as Aretas IV, King of the Nabataeans (9 B.C. - 40 A.D.) (2 Cor 11:32); Roman Emperors like Nero (54 - 68 A.D.) (Acts 26:32); the Roman Procurators Antonius Felix (52 - 60 A.D.) (Acts 24:24) and Porcius Festus (59 - 62 A.D) (Acts 24:27) the Herodian rulers Agrippa I (37 - 44 A.D.) and Agrippa II (55 - 95 A.D.) (Acts 25:13); and pagan deities such as Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus (Acts 19:28). See the bottom of this page for a chart of the cities Paul visited. Click on Travels of Paul to see a map and read an article about Paul's journeys.

Knidos, Karia, 2nd Century A.D.

|Other| |Caria|, |Knidos,| |Karia,| |2nd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |20|
"In Roman times Cnidus seems from its scanty coinage to have lost its former importance. Only a few coins exist, Nero to Caracalla..." -- B. V. Head in Historia Numorum
RP86514. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV temp 975 (19 spec.); Nordbø XXIX 1262; SNG Cop 331; BMC Caria p. 97, 97; Lindgren I 639; SNGvA -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -, VF, tight flan cutting off parts of obverse legend, obverse legend weak, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 7.174 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Cnidus mint, legate Eupoleitas, 2nd century A.D.; obverse T K T EΠI EYΠOΛEITA, bearded male head right; reverse flaming column altar, KNI-∆IΩN divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare, none on Coin Archives, RPC lists only three examples sold at auction, the last sold in 2006; $250.00 (€230.00)
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Hiketas, 287 - 278 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Hiketas,| |287| |-| |278| |B.C.||litra|
This combination of obverse and reverse control symbols (thunderbolt / star) is not published in the many references examined by Forum, however, we know of about a half dozen examples. The thunderbolt obverse control is most often combined with A over a star reverse left. The star reverse control is paired with a variety of obverse controls most commonly a trophy or bucranium.
GI87381. Bronze litra, cf. Calciati II p. 303, 157 Ds 59 Rs 14; SNG Mün 1308; SNG ANS 810; SNG Morcom 783; BMC Sicily p. 204, 473, VF, dark patina, tight flan, some bumps, scratch, and mild corrosion, weight 10.719 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 287 - 278 B.C.; obverse ∆IOΣ EΛΛANIOY, beardless and laureate head of Zeus Hellanios left, thunderbolt (control symbol) behind; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN (upward on left, undivided), eagle with wings open standing left atop fulmen, star (control symbol) lower left, linear border; apparently unpublished; rare variant; $135.00 (€124.20)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, William of Villehardouin, 1246 - 1278

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |William| |of| |Villehardouin,| |1246| |-| |1278||denier| |tournois|
William of Villehardouin became Prince of Achaea when his brother Geoffrey II died in 1246. He conquered the remaining Peloponnese territory and built the fortress of Mistra near Sparta. In 1249 he accompanied Louis IX of France on the Seventh Crusade, joining him in Cyprus with 400 knights and 28 ships. Louis gave him a license to mint coins in the style of royal French money. William defeated Venice in the War of the Euboeote Succession and defeated the Duke of Athens in 1258, reaffirming his power over the duchy. In 1259 he formed an alliance with the Byzantine Despotate of Epirus against Nicaea. He led the Achaean forces against the Nicaeans, but the Epirote army deserted and William was defeated. He fled and hid under a haystack, but was captured. He remained captive until 1262 and permanently lost all his power.Arms_of_Achaea
CR88480. Billon denier tournois, Tzamalis Frankish GV222; Metcalf Crusaders pl. 39, 938; Malloy Crusaders 10b, VF, centered, toned, uneven strike, encrustations, weight 0.755 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 270o, Corinth mint, obverse +•G•PRINCEPS, cross pattée; reverse :CLARENCIA▼ (R with a wedge foot = Corinth), castle tournois, spire in the form of Λ, surmounted by cross; from the Louis G Estate; $125.00 (€115.00)
 


Neapolis, Macedonia, c. 525 - 450 B.C.

|Other| |Macedonia|, |Neapolis,| |Macedonia,| |c.| |525| |-| |450| |B.C.||obol|
Neapolis, Macedonia (Kavala, Greece today), was founded by settlers from Thasos near the end of the 7th century B.C., to exploit the rich gold and silver mines of the area. At the end of the 6th century B.C. Neapolis ("new city" in Greek) claimed its independence from Thasos and struck its own silver coins with the head of Gorgon. A member of the Athenian League, Neapolis was besieged by the allied armies of the Spartans and the Thasians in 411 B.C., during the Peloponnesian War, but remained faithful to Athens. The Apostle Paul landed at Neapolis on his second and third missionary journeys.
GA96103. Silver obol, SNG ANS 423 - 424; BMC Macedonia p. 84, 13; HGC 3-1 585; SNG Cop -; Rosen -, gVF, slightly grainy, slightly porous, weight 0.632 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, Macedonia, Neapolis mint, c. 525 - 450 B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion), tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square; ex Roma e-sale 43 (3 Feb 2018), lot 95; $125.00 (€115.00)
 


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria||semis|
In 162, Marcus Aurelius sent Lucius Verus to lead the war against Parthia. Lucius spent most of the campaign in Antioch, though he wintered at Laodicea and summered at Daphne, a resort just outside Antioch. Critics derided Lucius' luxurious lifestyle. He took up a mistress, enjoyed the company of actors and would "dice the whole night through." The Syrian army was said to spend more time in Antioch's open-air cafés than with their units. The war was, nevertheless, a success. Despite Lucius' minimal personal participation, he was awarded the titles Armeniacus, Medicus and Parthicus Maximus and a triumph upon his return to Rome in 166.
RY93576. Bronze semis, RPC Online IV.3 T7149, McAlee 610, VF, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obverse a little off center, weight 7.575 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 161 - 169 A.D.; obverse AVT K Λ AVPHΛ OVHPOC CEB, radiate head right; reverse S•C, uncertain Greek numeral-letter below, all within wreath; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), lot 483; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Assos, Troas, c. 479 - 450 B.C.

|Troas|, |Assos,| |Troas,| |c.| |479| |-| |450| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Though the town is officially named Behramkale, most people still call it by its ancient name, Assos. The town is on the coast of the Adramyttian Gulf on the southern side of Biga Peninsula, just north of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).
GS96090. Silver hemiobol, SNG Arikantürk 295; Weber 5318; BMC Troas p. 36, 3; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Ashmolean –, VF, centered on a tight flan, toned, porosity, weight 0.286 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, die axis 180o, Assos (Behramkale, Turkey) mint, c. 479 - 450 B.C.; obverse griffin reclining right, left forepaw raised; reverse lion head right, jaws open, tongue protruding, within incuse square; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Philip of Savoy, 1301 - 1307

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |Philip| |of| |Savoy,| |1301| |-| |1307||denier| |tournois|
Philip of Savoy was the lord of Piedmont from 1282 until his death and prince of Achaea between 1301 and 1307. He was the son of Thomas III of Piedmont and Guyonne de Châlon. Philip's first marriage was celebrated in Rome on February 12, 1301 to Isabella of Villehardouin, Princess of Achaea. By that marriage, he became Prince of Achaea, though he had already been lord of Piedmont by inheritance from his father in 1282. As prince, Philip ventured to reconquer all of Lacedaemonia from the Greeks. He was, however, an authoritative prince and this put him at odds with the baronage of his realm. He tried to placate the barons of Morea, but was forced to accept a parliament in 1304. The Greek peasantry, crushed by taxes, then revolted in turn. In 1307, King Charles II of Naples, the suzerain of Achaea, confiscated the principality and gave it to his son, Prince Philip I of Taranto. Metcalf indicates all of Philip's coins appear to have been struck at Corinth.Frankokratia_Map
CR88479. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 21; Metcalf Crusades type PS2, VF, centered, weight 0.749 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 1301 - 1307; obverse +•Ph's•D'SAB•P•AChE•, cross pattée; reverse ⚜DE CLARENCIA⚜, castle tournois, surmounted by cross, pellet on each side of castle, fleur-de-lis below castle; much less common than the star under castle type, from the Louis G Estate; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Assos, Troas, c. 480 - 450 B.C.

|Troas|, |Assos,| |Troas,| |c.| |480| |-| |450| |B.C.||tetartemorion|NEW
Assos was a harbor city on the Gulf of Adramytteion, just north of the island of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).

An astragalos was a gaming piece, made from the knuckle-bone of a sheep or goat, used in antiquity for divination and games in a manner similar to dice.
GA96770. Silver tetartemorion, Klein 475 (Teos), SNG Kayhan -, BMC Ionia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, Balcer -, VF, dark toning, porosity, edge split, weight 0.175 g, maximum diameter 6.6 mm, Assos (Behramkale, Turkey) mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse griffin right; reverse astragalos within incuse square; rare; $100.00 (€92.00)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Mahaut (Maud) of Hainaut, 1316 - 1318

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |Mahaut| |(Maud)| |of| |Hainaut,| |1316| |-| |1318||denier| |tournois|
This was one of very few medieval coin types minted under female authority. In 1313, Philip I of Taranto, in compensation for breaking their engagement, granted Achaea to Maud and gave her hand to Louis of Burgundy. The principality was, however, possessed by another claimant, Ferdinand of Majorca. At the Battle of Manolada on 5 July 1316, Ferdinand was killed and Louis took control. He was poisoned soon after, leaving 23-year-old Maud in charge. Rule was soon disputed by varying claimants and Maud was dispossessed of her fief by 1318, in which year John, Duke of Durazzo, abducted the princess and forced her to marry him. She did not give him children, however, and he repudiated her in 1321. Maud married again to Hugh de La Palice and retired to Aversa, where she died in 1331.Arms_of_Achaea
CR88475. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 42; Metcalf Crusades type MA2, pl. 40, 998, VF, toned, clashed dies, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, weight 0.646 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Corinth mint, 1316 - 1318; obverse + MAhAVTA•P•Ach', cross pattée, lis begins legend; reverse ⚜DE CLARENCIA (R with a large wedge foot = Corinth), castle tournois, surmounted by cross, C (Corinth?) left; from the Louis G Estate; $95.00 (€87.40)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Philip of Savoy, 1301 - 1307

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |Philip| |of| |Savoy,| |1301| |-| |1307||denier| |tournois|
Philip of Savoy was the lord of Piedmont from 1282 until his death and prince of Achaea between 1301 and 1307. He was the son of Thomas III of Piedmont and Guyonne de Châlon. Philip's first marriage was celebrated in Rome on February 12, 1301 to Isabella of Villehardouin, Princess of Achaea. By that marriage, he became Prince of Achaea, though he had already been lord of Piedmont by inheritance from his father in 1282. As prince, Philip ventured to reconquer all of Lacedaemonia from the Greeks. He was, however, an authoritative prince and this put him at odds with the baronage of his realm. He tried to placate the barons of Morea, but was forced to accept a parliament in 1304. The Greek peasantry, crushed by taxes, then revolted in turn. In 1307, King Charles II of Naples, the suzerain of Achaea, confiscated the principality and gave it to his son, Prince Philip I of Taranto. Metcalf indicates all of Philip's coins appear to have been struck at Corinth.Arms_of_Achaea
CR88483. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 20, Metcalf Crusades type PS1, VF, toned, clashed dies, uneven strike, slight double strike, weight 0.805 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 1301 - 1307; obverse +•Phs•D'SAB•P•AChE•, cross pattée; reverse (quatrefoil) DE CLARENCIA (quatrefoil), castle tournois, surmounted by cross, five pointed star below castle; from the Louis G Estate; $95.00 (€87.40)
 




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES




 

Road to Damascus

1st Missionary Journey

2nd Missionary Journey

3rd Missionary Journey

Journey to Rome

 Jerusalem
 Damascus
 Nabataean Kingdom
 Damascus
 Jerusalem
 Lydda
 Joppa
 Caesarea
 Tarsus
 Antioch (Syria)

 

 

 

 

 

 Antioch (Syria)
 Seleucia Pieria
 Salamis
 Paphos
 Perge
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Iconium
 Lystra
 Derbe
 Attalia
 Antioch (Syria)

 Jerusalem
 Antioch (Syria)
 Trasus
 Derbe
 Lystra
 Iconium
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Dorylaeum
 Alexandria Troas
 Neapolis
 Philippi
 Amphipolis
 Apollonia
 Thessalonica
 Beroea
 Athens
 Corinth
 Cenchreae
 Ephesus
 Caesarea
 Jerusalem
 Antioch (Syria)

 Antioch (Syria)
 Tarsus
 Derbe
 Lystra
 Iconium
 Antioch (Pisidia)
 Ephesus
 Alexandria Troas
 Philippi
 Thessalonica
 Corinth
 Philippi
 Assos
 Miletos
 Patara
 Tyre
 Ptolemais
 Caesarea
 Joppa
 Jerusalem

 Jerusalem
 Caesarea
 Sidon
 Myra
 Malta
 Syracuse
 Rhegium
 Puteoli
 Rome


Italics means there is no evidence that coins were minted in that city.


Catalog current as of Thursday, January 21, 2021.
Page created in 0.687 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity