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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Kallatis||View Options:  |  |  |   

Kallatis, Thrace

Kallatis was founded on the Black Sea by Heraclea Pontica in the 6th century B.C. In Greek Kallatis means "the beautiful." Its first silver coinage was minted approximately 350 B.C. In 72 B.C., Kallatis was conquered by the Roman general Lucullus and was included in the Roman province of Moesia Inferior. Throughout the 2nd century A.D., the city built defensive fortifications. Kallatis suffered multiple invasions in the 3rd century A.D. but recovered in the 4th century A.D. to regain its status as an important trade hub and port city. Today Kallatis is called Mangalia, the oldest city in Romania.

Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH33203. Gold stater, Price 915, Mller Alexander 816, gVF, weight 8.453 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Thrace, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, K and (ΠA monogram) left; nice style; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH38171. Gold stater, Price 897, Mller Alexander 1638, aEF, nice style, scrape on cheek, weight 8.496 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, posthumous, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆P[OY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right hand, stylus in left, Kallatis monogram to left; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.|, |stater|
SH33209. Gold stater, Price 906, gVF, struck in high relief, mint luster in recesses, weight 8.458 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Thrace, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, K left, AP monogram lower left under wing; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.|, |stater|
SH38330. Gold stater, Price 894, Mller Alexander 1637, gVF, several scrapes and marks, weight 8.442 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, posthumous, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right hand, stylus in left, Kallatis monogram to left; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH15376. Gold stater, Price 904, aEF, finder's scrape on helmet, weight 8.412 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Thrace, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse AΛEΞAN∆P[OY], Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right hand, stylus in left, KA and AP monograms to left; high relief obverse strike in fine style; scarce; SOLD


Kingdom of Pontos, Mithradates VI Eupator, c. 120 - 63 B.C., In the Name and Types of Lysimachos of Thrace

|Pontic| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Pontos,| |Mithradates| |VI| |Eupator,| |c.| |120| |-| |63| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Lysimachos| |of| |Thrace|, |stater|
In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century A.D. when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.
SH88032. Gold stater, Callata p. 140, pl. XXXVII (D4/R2); SNG Cop 1089; AMNG I 260; HGC 3.2 1824, VF, well centered and struck on a compact flan, die wear, some bumps and marks, weight 8.277 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis mint, First Mithradatic War, c. 88 - 86 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena seated left, Victory crowning name with wreath held in Athena's extended right hand, resting left elbow on round shield leaning on back of seat, HP monogram inner left, KAΛ below seat, trident in exergue ornamented with two small dolphins, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; SOLD


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Lysimachos Type

|Pontic| |Kingdom|, |Pontic| |Kingdom,| |Mithradates| |VI,| |c.| |120| |-| |63| |B.C.,| |Lysimachos| |Type|, |stater|
Mithradates VI Eupator "the Great"expanded his Pontic Kingdom through conquest, which inevitably brought him into conflict with Rome. Mithradates regarded himself as the champion of the Greeks against Rome, however, after three years of war, he was defeated by Pompey the Great. The design of this coin is taken from a coin of Lysimachos, bodyguard of Alexander the Great, and King of Thrace 323 - 281 B.C. The Lysimachos coin depicted Alexander the Great on the obverse. The features of the obverse portrait on this type are those of Mithradates VI.
SH88831. Gold stater, Callata p. 140, pl. XXXVII (D3/R1); AMNG I 263; HGC 3.2 1824; SNG Cop 1089 var. (control), VF, struck with worn dies, weight 8.206 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis mint, First Mithradatic War, c. 88 - 86 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena seated left, Victory crowning name with wreath held in Athena's extended right hand, resting left elbow on round shield leaning on back of seat, A∆ monogram (control) inner left, KAΛ below seat, trident in exergue ornamented with two small dolphins, ΛYΣIMAXOY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; Kirk Davis, catalog 70, lot 11; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Kallatis, Moesia Inferior

|Septimius| |Severus|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Kallatis,| |Moesia| |Inferior|, |pentassarion|
Kallatis was founded on the Black Sea by Heraclea Pontica in the 6th century B.C. In Greek Kallatis means "the beautiful." Its first silver coinage was minted approximately 350 B.C. In 72 B.C., Kallatis was conquered by the Roman general Lucullus and was included in the Roman province of Moesia Inferior. Throughout the 2nd century A.D., the city built defensive fortifications. Kallatis suffered multiple invasions in the 3rd century A.D. but recovered in the 4th century A.D. to regain its status as an important trade hub and port city. Today Kallatis is called Mangalia, the oldest city in Romania.
SH48188. Bronze pentassarion, Unpublished; Varbanov I -, AMNG I/I -; cf. Varbanov I 309 (Caracalla, same reverse die) and AMNG I/I 321 (also Caracalla), VF, weight 13.409 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, obverse AV K Λ CEΠ CEVHPO Π, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse KAΛΛATIANΩN, city-gate flanked by two towers, E (mark of value) exergue; possibly unique; SOLD


Kallatis, Moesia Inferior, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C.

|Kallatis|, |Kallatis,| |Moesia| |Inferior,| |3rd| |-| |2nd| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |26|
Apollo's most important attribute is the tripod lebes, a cauldron in a three-legged stand used for religious rituals. The tripod lebes is symbolic of his prophetic powers. At his temple at Delphi, his priestess sat on his tripod chewing laurel leaves and inhaling hallucinating vapors from a fissure in the floor. After she mumbled her prophesy, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
GB76836. Bronze AE 26, cf. AMNG I/I 230 ff. (various magistrates), SNG Stancomb 69 ff. (same), SNG BM 214 var. (same), SNG Cop -, VF, bold countermarks, attractive turquoise patina, edge crack, weight 12.204 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, 3rd - 2nd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, countermarks: veiled(?) head right in round punch; head of Hermes(?) in round punch; reverse KAΛΛA/TIANΩN, tripod, stalk of grain far left, magistrate name or monogram below; scarce; SOLD


Kallatis, Thrace, c. 300 - 250 B.C.

|Kallatis|, |Kallatis,| |Thrace,| |c.| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GS12243. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 176, SNG BM 202, gVF, weight 5.394 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 90o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse KAΛΛATIA, grain ear, club and bow case; high relief and nicely toned; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Mller, L. Die Mnzen Des Thracishen Konigs Lysimacus. (Copenhagen, 1858).
Mller, L. Numismatique d?Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Pick, B. Die antiken Mnzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Mnzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I. (Berlin, 1898).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Price, M. J. The Coinage in the name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (Zurich-London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2: Volume 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnchen Staatlische Mnzsammlung, Part 7: Taurische Chersonesos, Sarmatien, Dacia, Moesia superior, Moesia inferior. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Wartenberg, U. and J.H. Kagan, "Some Comments on a New Hoard from the Balkan Sea" in Travaux Le Rider.
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).

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