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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & Moesia ▸ Apollonia PonticaView Options:  |  |  | 

Apollonia Pontica, Thrace

Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87187. Bronze Ring Money, 4 bronze rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, (1x) Victoor VIII-23 & VIII-24 (smaller and cruder), Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, gear-wheel type ring with eight spokes and 24 teeth, 34.995g, 54mm, very large and extremely rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.981g, c. 27mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, two rings interlocked, each with 3 groups of 2 globules, 8.914g, c. 28mm each; $250.00 (212.50)


Five Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87188. Bronze Ring Money, 5 rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 88, III.0, 8 sets of 3 knobs, asymmetric, 60.234g, 70mm, very large, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 104 - 105, XVII, three-blade propeller type ring, 1.514g, 32mm; (2x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, c. 3.4g, c. 26mm each; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VII.0, 3 globules, 1.630g, c. 20mm; $250.00 (212.50)


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87189. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 88, III.0, 10 sets of 3 knobs, symmetric, 56.833g, 84mm, very large, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 93, XII.0, cylindrical ring with three rings of knobs, 5.202g, 19mm diameter, 8mm long; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 92, XI.0, ring with 7 large knobs, 9.870g, 26mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.184g, 24mm; $250.00 (212.50)


Six Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87183. Bronze Ring Money, 6 bronze rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, symmetric, well formed, (1x) cf. Victoor IX-2b, Topalov Apollonia p. 109, XIX.0, wheel ring with four spokes, 10.442g, 31mm; (2x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, c. 3.9g, c. 26mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, two rings interlocked, each with 3 groups of 2 globules, 8.064g, c. 29mm each; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VII.0, 3 globules, 3.780g, c. 22mm; $230.00 (195.50)


Five Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87184. Bronze Ring Money, 5 rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, all symmetric, well formed, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 88, III.0, 12 knobs, 19.512g, 60mm, very large and very rare; (3x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, each c. 3.0g, c. 25mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VII.0, small 3 globules, 1.167g, c. 19.5mm; $220.00 (187.00)


Five Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87185. Bronze Ring Money, 5 rings, VF, nice patinas, symmetric, well formed, (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, 4 knobs each ornamented with two nubs, 40.934g, 62mm, Very large and extremely rare; (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, triangular with each vertex ornamented with a knob trigon, 7.583g, 19mm, extremely rare; (3x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, each c. 3.8g, c. 26mm; $220.00 (187.00)


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87186. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, VF, nice patinas, some chipping on nubs of large ring, asymmetrical - varying thickness, not all knobs and nubs evenly spaced, (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, 4 knobs each ornamented with three nubs, 31.858g, 64mm, very large and extremely rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 93, XII.0, small cylindrical ring with three rings of knobs, 8.746g, 15mm diameter, 13mm long, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.073g, 26mm; (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VIII.0 (all symmetrical), 4 globules unevenly spaced, 3.725g, 22mm; $220.00 (187.00)


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87190. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, VF, nice patinas, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia p. 89, VI.0 (many more knobs), 4 knobs, 54.514g, 82mm, very large and rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, each 4.683g, c. 26mm; (1x) cf. Victoor VI (many variations none too similar to this) ring with a floral or gear appearance, 14 pedals/teeth, 15.720g, 29mm; (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia p. 90, VII.0 (normal, round with three knobs), small ring with 3 knobs forming a Reuleaux triangle, 2.328g, 21mm; $220.00 (187.00)







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REFERENCES

Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Monnaies Grecques. (Amsterdam, 1883).
Naville Co. Monnaies grecques antiques S. Pozzi. Auction 1. (4 April 1921, Geneva).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Topalov, S. Apollonia Pontica, Contribution to the Study of the Coin Minting of the City 6th - 1st c. B.C. (Sofia, 2007).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Mysia. (London, 1892).

Catalog current as of Friday, July 20, 2018.
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Apollonia Pontica