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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Vessels & CupsView Options:  |  |  |     

Vessels and Cups on Ancient Coins

Vessels and cups depicted on coins were often those used in religious ceremonies, but also those used in daily life. The amphora, used to store olive-oil and wine, is often depicted on coins, especially from cities that were big wine producers.


Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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During the mummification process, large organs, such as the liver, lungs, stomach and intestines were extracted and placed in four jars. In the Ptolemaic period, the Greeks called these jars "canopic jars," relating them to the deity of the old city Canop (now a village in Abu Kyr). The heart was left in the body because it held the spirit, understanding and senses and would be needed on the Day of Judgment in the underworld.
RX68898. Bronze obol, RPC I 5352; Kampmann 17.28; Dattari 318; BMC Alexandria p 24, 204; Emmett 181; Geissen -, F, weight 5.514 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 68 - 15 Jan 69 A.D.; obverse CEΠOYI ΓAΛBA AYTO KAIΣ ΣEBA, laureate head right, LB (year 2) below chin; reverse Canopic Jar of Osiris right, with headdress, horns, uraei and plumes, L B (year 2) on right; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; very rare; $160.00 (140.80)


Mende, Macedonia, 400 - 346 B.C.

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Mende was an ancient colony of Eretria, on the SW side of Cape Poseidion in Pallene. Its coins illustrate some forgotten myth of Dionysos, his companion Seilenos, and an ass. The wine of Mende was famous and is frequently mentioned by ancient writers. It is unlikely that Mende struck any coins after it was first captured by Philip in 358 B.C.
GB68715. Bronze chalkous, SNG Cop 221; SNG ANS 397 var (crescent above); BMC Macedonia p. 83, 13 var (no ivy branch), VF, weight 1.078 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 315o, Mende mint, 400 - 346 B.C.; obverse head of youthful Dionysos to left, wearing ivy wreath; reverse MEN, Amphora with tall handles, ivy branch left; scarce; $135.00 (118.80)


Thasos, Thrace, c. 411 - 350 B.C.

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In 411 B.C., Thasos revolted from Athens and received a Lacedaemonian governor. In 407 B.C. Spartans were expelled and the Athenians readmitted. After the Battle of Aegospotami in 405 B.C., Thasos again fell under the Lacedaemonians led by Lysander who formed a decarchy there. Athens must have recovered it, for later it was one of the subjects of dispute with Philip II of Macedonia.
GS74533. Silver trihemiobol, BMC Thrace p. 221, 53 ff., SGCV I 1755, SNG Cop 1029 ff., Dewing 1331, aVF, well centered, attractive style, light corrosion, weight 0.824 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 270o, Thasos mint, c. 411 - 350 B.C.; obverse satyr on left knee, facing left, nude, cantharus in right hand; reverse ΘAΣ−IΩN, amphora; $130.00 (114.40)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS70252. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 43 (C2); RSC II 43; BMCRE II 50; BnF III 36; Hunter I 21; SRCV I -, aVF, nice portrait, toned, weight 3.376 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jul - Dec 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus (emblems of the augurate and pontificate), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $125.00 (110.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS70267. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 43 (C2); RSC II 43; BMCRE II 50; BnF III 36; Hunter I 21; SRCV I -, aVF, excellent portrait, toned, weight 3.372 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jul - Dec 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus (emblems of the augurate and pontificate), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $125.00 (110.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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RS70274. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 356; SRCV I 2282; BMCRE II 64; RSC II 45, aVF, nice portrait, toned, high-points flatly struck, weight 3.362 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus (emblems of the augurate and pontificate), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $125.00 (110.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, 223 - 187 B.C.

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In 213 B.C., after a two year siege, allied with Attalus I of Pergamum, Antiochus III captured the rebel capital Sardes and executed the rebel king Achaeus. Houghton and Lorber explain that this type is attributed to Sardes based on excavation finds, that the denomination does not fit Sardian tradition, and that it was probably struck to support Antiochus' troops during the siege.
GB71681. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber I 972, Newell WSM 1108, HGC 9 488 (R2), VF, well centered on a tight flan, attractive style, nice green patina, light corrosion, weight 7.046 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, near Sardes (Sart, Turkey), military mint, c. 215 - 213 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, short hair with longer locks on the back of the neck; reverse tripod lebes, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, no control symbols; very rare; $125.00 (110.00)


Lamia, Thessaly, Greece, 400 - 344 B.C.

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Lamia has been inhabited since at least the 3rd millennium B.C., but the first historical mention is after an earthquake in 424 B.C., when it was an important Spartan military base. The city held a strategic location, controlling the narrow coastal plain that connected southern Greece with Thessaly and the rest of the Balkans. It was therefore fortified in the 5th century B.C., and was contested by the Macedonians, Thessalians and Aetolians until the Roman conquest in the early 2nd century B.C.
GS75127. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 77; BCD Thessaly 1089; BCD Thessaly II 123; Trait IV 457 & pl. CCLXXXVII, 20; BMC Thessaly p. 22, 2; Georgiou Lamia 6, VF, toned, scratches, weight 2.429 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 345o, Lamia mint, 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wearing ivy wreath; reverse ΛAMIE−ΩN, amphora with two handles, ivy leaf above, prochous with handle lower right, all within shallow round incuse; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 12 (1 Nov 2014), lot 266; ex Frank James Collection; ex William Holzman (1962); $125.00 (110.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS70279. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 356; RSC II 45; BMCRE II 64; BnF III 49; Hunter I 27; SRCV I 2282, VF, nice portrait, toned, well centered on a tight flan, high points flatly struck, weight 3.338 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 72 - early 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus (emblems of the augurate and pontificate), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $120.00 (105.60)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS70413. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 356 (C3); RSC II 45; BMCRE II 64; BnF III 49; Hunter I 27; SRCV I 2282, VF, toned, weak center high-points, weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 72 - early 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus (emblems of the augurate and pontificate), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $120.00 (105.60)




    



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Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 10, 2016.
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