Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Vessels & Cups||View Options:  |  |  |   

Vessels and Cups on Ancient Coins

Vessels and cups depicted on coins were often those used in religious ceremonies, but also those used in daily life. The amphora, used to store olive-oil and wine, is often depicted on coins, especially from cities that were big wine producers.

Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Small Glass Jar with Funnel Mouth, 3rd - 4th Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Syro-Palestinian,| |Small| |Glass| |Jar| |with| |Funnel| |Mouth,| |3rd| |-| |4th| |Century| |A.D.|,
A globular body with a funnel mouth is a very common form from the third to fourth century. Some vessels of this form were finely made, some were decorated, and some, like this specimen were plain and utilitarian.
AG21015. cf. Isings 104b, Yale Gallery 268, Ontario Museum 474 (larger), Average, complete and intact, spots of rust colored weathering, glass small jar with a flaring mouth, 4.9 cm (1 7/8) tall, 3.9 cm (1 1/2") maximum diameter, free-blown, careless irregular shape, pale near colorless aquamarine glass, many bubbles, bulbous body, short neck, funnel mouth, fire rounded rim, kicked bottom with pontil mark; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00


Thasos, Thrace, c. 404 - 355 B.C.

|Thasos|, |Thasos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |404| |-| |355| |B.C.|, |trihemiobol|NEW
In 411 B.C., Thasos revolted from Athens and received a Lacedaemonian governor. In 407 B.C. Spartans were expelled and the Athenians readmitted. After the Battle of Aegospotami in 405 B.C., Thasos again fell under the Lacedaemonians led by Lysander who formed a decarchy there. Athens must have recovered it, for later it was one of the subjects of dispute with Philip II of Macedonia.
GS95926. Silver trihemiobol, Le Rider Thasiennes 27; BMC Thrace p. 221, 53 ff.; SNG Cop 1029 ff., Dewing 1331; HGC 6 351 (S); SGCV I 1755, VF, centered on a tight flan, nice old collection toning, scratches, marks, punch on reverse, tiny edge cracks, weight 0.763 g, maximum diameter 11.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thasos mint, c. 404 - 355 B.C.; obverse satyr kneeling left, on left knee, nude but for cloak tied at waist and flying behind, kantharos in right hand; reverse ΘAΣ−IΩN, volute krater; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Perinthos, Thrace, c. Late 3rd - Mid 1st Century B.C.

|Perinthus|, |Perinthos,| |Thrace,| |c.| |Late| |3rd| |-| |Mid| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |17|
Perinthos an ancient Ionian colony from Samos, was situated between Bisanthe and Selymbria, on the northern shore of the Propontis. It is famous chiefly for its stubborn and successful resistance to Philip II of Macedon in 340 B.C.; at that time it seems to have been more important than Byzantium itself. In Roman times it was called Heraclea Thraciae (or Heraclea Perinthus). Today it is Marmara Ereglisi in the European part of Turkey.
RP89906. Bronze AE 17, Schnert-Geiss Perinthos p. 101 & pl. 3, 67 (same dies, 2 specimens); CN_1989; Mionnet Supp. 2, p. 399, 1173; SNG Cop -; BMC Thrace -, F, dark brown patina, porous, scratches, die wear, weight 3.930 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 225o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, c. late 3rd - mid 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse tripod lebes, ΠEPIN/ΘIΩN in two flanking downward lines, the first on the right; less than 1/2 dozen specimens known to FORVM; very rare; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00


Myrina, Aeolis, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Aeolis|, |Myrina,| |Aeolis,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |16|
Myrina is said to have been founded before the other Aeolian cities by either Myrinus or the Amazon Myrina. Artaxerxes gave Gryneium and Myrina to Gongylus, an Eretrian, who had been banished from his native city for favoring Persia. Myrina had a good harbor. Pliny the Elder mentions the fame of its oysters and that it bore the surname of Sebastopolis (venerable city). An inscription tells us that Myrina was within the Kingdom of Pergamon in the 3rd century B.C. For some time Myrina was occupied by Philip V of Macedon; but the Romans compelled him to evacuate, and declared the place free. It twice suffered severe earthquakes, in the reigns of Tiberius and Trajan. The town was restored each time, and continued to exist until a late period. It was the birthplace of Agathias, a Byzantine poet and historian of the 6th century.
GB93490. Bronze AE 16, SNG Cop 225; SNGvA 1666; SNG Munchen 571 - 573; BMC Troas p. 137, 27 ff., Choice VF, green patina with highlighting buff earthen deposits, weight 4.477 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Myrina (near Aliaga, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse amphora, lyre right, MY-PI flanking across lower field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Kios, Bithynia, c. 325 - 203 B.C.

|Bithynia|, |Kios,| |Bithynia,| |c.| |325| |-| |203| |B.C.|, |AE| |11|
According to myth, Kios (Cius) was founded on the Propontis (Sea of Marmara) by Herakles when he accompanied the Argonauts. According to historians, it was founded in 626 - 625 B.C. by colonists from Miletos. Kios was often subject to greater powers, predominantly the Persian Empire until Alexander the Great invaded and took the city in 334 B.C. After disputes with Alexander's successors, Kios joined the Aetolian League, in opposition to Macedonia. In 202 B.C., Philip V of Macedonia and Prusias I of Bythinia destroyed the city and massacred, banished, or enslaved its citizens. Prusias built a new city on the site and named it for himself (Prusias ad Mare). After this atrocity, the Rodians asked the Roman Senate for help. The Romans seized this opportunity to invade Greece and defeat Philip V. In 74 B.C., after the death of King Nikomides III, the Romans occupied Kios and the whole of Bythinia. Under Rome, the name Kios was revived. An important link in the ancient Silk Road, Kios became a wealthy town.
GB89135. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 382; BMC Pontus, p. 131, 20; var. (KIA); SNGvA 7004 var. (same); Rec Gn I.2 7 var. (same), VF, nice dark green patina, weight 1.020 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kios (Bursa, Turkey) mint, c. 325 - 203 B.C.; obverse young beardless male head (Mithras?) right, wearing a Phrygian cap and laurel wreath; reverse Kantharos between two bunches of grapes hanging on vines which emerge from the cup, K-I divided by stem, all within wreath of two stalks of grain; rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Krannon, Thessaly, Greece, 350 - 300 B.C.

|Thessaly|, |Krannon,| |Thessaly,| |Greece,| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |dichalkon|
In 322 B.C., at Krannon, Thessaly, the Macedonian general Antipater decisively defeated an anti-Macedonian alliance of the Athenians, Aetolians, Thessalians, the Phoceans, the Lokrians and some Peloponnesian states. After the defeat, Athens was forced to abolish its democracy, the leaders responsible for the war were sentenced to death and a Macedonian garrison was stationed at the port of Mounychia.
GB92183. Bronze dichalkon, Rogers 199; BMC Thessaly p. 16, 5 var. (no obv letter); SNG Cop 43 var. (same); SGCV I 2073, aVF, dark patina, minor earthen deposits, weight 4.923 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Krannon mint, 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys, K (control symbol) upper left; reverse K-PA/NNO, hydria (water carrying vessel) mounted on cart; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 165 (17 Mar 2008), part of lot 2515; $85.00 SALE |PRICE| $76.50


Larissa-Ptolemais, Troas, 3rd Century B.C.

|Troas|, |Larissa-Ptolemais,| |Troas,| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.|, |AE| |13|
Imhoof-Blumer attributed this type to Ptolemais in Pamphylia, but in Hill convincingly argued against that city. Waddington was of the opinion that these coins might belong to Lebedos under the name Ptolemais. L. Robert in Monnaies antiques en Troade (Paris, 1966), p. 56, suggests Larissa-Ptolemais in Troas. Most recent auction listings accept Robert's attribution but the identity of the city is by no means certain.
GB88082. Bronze AE 13, SNGvA 2026 (Lebedos-Ptolemais, Ionia), BMC Troas -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tbingen -, SNG Munchen -, Winterthur -, Klein -, VF, nice dark patina, some porosity, earthen deposits, weight 1.988 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa-Ptolemais mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIEΩ, amphora; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Laodikea ad Mare, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 80 - 79 B.C.

|Syria|, |Laodikea| |ad| |Mare,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |80| |-| |79| |B.C.|, |AE| |22|
Laodicea ad Mare prospered thanks to the excellent wine produced in the nearby hills and was also famous for its textiles, both of which were exported to all the empire. A sizable Jewish population lived in Laodicea during the first century. Under Septimius Severus the city was fortified and was made for a few years the capital of Roman Syria: in this period Laodicea grew to be a city of nearly 40,000 inhabitants and had even an hippodrome. Christianity was the main religion in the city after Constantine I and many bishops of Laodicea participated in ecumenical councils, mainly during Byzantine times. The heretic Apollinarius was bishop of Laodicea in the 4th century, when the city was fully Christian but with a few remaining Jews. An earthquake damaged the city in 494 A.D. Justinian I made Laodicea the capital of the Byzantine province of "Theodorias" in the early sixth century. Laodicea remained its capital for more than a century until the Arab conquest.
GB88223. Bronze AE 22, BMC Galatia p. 248, 10; HGC 9 1405 (R1); SNG Munchen -; SNG Cop -, VF, green patina, scratches and marks, corrosion, light earthen deposits, weight 7.132 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 80 - 79 B.C.; obverse laureate, bearded head of Zeus right; reverse tripod lebes, B (year 2 of the era of Laodikea ad Mare) inner left, ΛAO∆IKEΩN THΣ / IEPAΣ KAI in two downward lines on right, AYTONOMOY downward on left, EI(?) in exergue; rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Leontini, Sicily, c. 405 - 402 B.C.

|Other| |Sicily|, |Leontini,| |Sicily,| |c.| |405| |-| |402| |B.C.|, |tetras|NEW
Leontini was founded as by colonists from Naxos in 729 BC, itself a Chalcidian colony established five years earlier. It was the only significant Greek settlement in Sicily not located on the coast, being some 6 miles inland. The site, originally held by the Sicels, was seized by the Greeks owing to its command of the fertile plain to the north. The city was reduced to subject status in 498 BC by Hippocrates of Gela, and in 476 BC Hieron of Syracuse moved the inhabitants from Catania and Naxos to Leontini.
GI93445. Bronze tetras, Calciati III p. 77, 3; SNG Cop 360; SNG ANS 270; SNG Morcom 606; SNG Lloyd 1070; BMC Sicily p. 92, 56; Laffaille 169; HGC 2 709 (R1), gF, dark patina, scattered porosity/corrosion, small edge crack, obverse edge beveled, weight 2.110 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 90o, Leontini mint, c. 405 - 402 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, olive leaf and olive behind; reverse tripod lebes, a barley kernel flanking on each side, kithara between legs of tripod, three pellets in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Pantikapaion, Tauric Chersonesos. Thrace, c. 109 - 105 B.C.

|Pantikapaion|, |Pantikapaion,| |Tauric| |Chersonesos.| |Thrace,| |c.| |109| |-| |105| |B.C.|, |dichalkon|
Panticapaeum (Kerch, Ukraine) was an important city and port in Tauric Chersonesos on the western side of the Cimmerian Bosporus. It was founded by Milesians in the late 7th or early 6th century B.C. In the 5th century B.C. it became the capital of the Thracian kings of Bosporus. The last of the kings of Bosporus left it to Mithridates VI Eupator, king of Pontus. After his defeat to Rome, he committed suicide at Panticapaeum in 63 B.C. In that same year, the city was partly destroyed by an earthquake.
GB89366. Bronze dichalkon, SNG BM 941, SNG Cop 48, MacDonald Bosporus 161, Anokhin 203, HGC 7 128, SNG Stancomb -, aVF, dark patina, off center, light corrosion, light marks, weight 3.390 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 90o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 109 - 105 B.C.; obverse star of eight rays around central pellet, Π-A-N-T-I-K-A-Π between rays; reverse tripod lebes; scarce; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Tuesday, August 11, 2020.
Page created in 0.86 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity