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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Quality| ▸ |Patina||View Options:  |  |  |   

Patina on ancient coins

In this section we include the most attractively patinated bronze coins of our selection, as well as uncleaned hoard and fine cabinet toned silver.

Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Mamaea|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Describing this coin "as-found" does not mean recently found. This coin, part of a family collection assembled over generations, was found long ago. Silver denarii sold as found with their natural dark toning are rare. Very often the toning is uneven and unattractive and the coins are cleaned to remove it. This coin and others from the find were clearly an exception and its attractive toning has been left intact for decades and should never be removed.
RS94698. Silver denarius, RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, Hunter III 1, SRCV II 8212, Choice EF, very attractive as-found dark hoard toning, well centered, flow lines, attractive portrait, small edge splits, weight 1.904 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 11 Mar - 31 Dec 222 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right, hair in waved horizontal ridges, looped plait at back of neck; reverse IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing slightly left, head left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock standing left with head right at feet on left; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $400.00 (368.00)


Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

|Herennius| |Etruscus|, |Herennius| |Etruscus,| |Early| |251| |-| |First| |Half| |of| |June| |251| |A.D.||sestertius|
The reverse legend dedicates this coin to the Prince of Youth, Herennius Etruscus. When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RB95775. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV Decius 171a (R), Cohen V 28, Banti 6, Hunter III 22, SRCV III 9534, aVF/F, excellent portrait, attractive mottled patina, porosity, rough areas, squared flan, reverse legend mostly obscure or off flan, weight 18.297 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, bare-headed, draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Herennius standing left in military dress, rod downward in right, transverse spear in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; rare; $225.00 (207.00)


Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D., Antioch, Syria, Civic Christian Persecution Issue

|Antioch|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria,| |Civic| |Christian| |Persecution| |Issue||quarter| |follis|
In 311, after the death of Galerius in late April or May, representatives from Nicomedia presented themselves before Maximinus, bringing images of their gods and requested that Christians not be allowed to live in their city. Late in 311, an embassy from Antioch, led by their curator Theotecnus, also requested permission to banish Christians from their city and its territory. Other cities followed with the same request. Maximinus support for Antioch's requests is advertised by this coin type. Fearing his co-emperors, however, Maximinus changed his mind. His edict in May 313 restored privileges and property to Christians. Later in 313, Licinius captured Antioch and executed Theotecnus.
RL93284. Billon quarter follis, McAlee 171(d), Van Heesch 2, Vagi 2955, SRCV IV 14932, gVF, dark patina, earthen highlighting deposits, weight 1.560 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 312 - May 313 A.D.; obverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the Protector), Jupiter seated left, globe in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Victory left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left, ∆ in right field, ANT in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $180.00 (165.60)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Mamaea|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
On 11 March 222, Elagabalus was assassinated, along with his mother, Julia Soaemias, by the Praetorian Guard. Their mutilated bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome before being thrown into the Tiber. Severus Alexander succeeded Elagabalus. He was only 13 years old, his mother, Julia Avita Mamaea, governed the Roman Empire with the help of Domitius Ulpianus and a council of 16 senators.
RS94688. Silver denarius, RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, Hunter III 1, SRCV II 8212, Choice gVF, dark as-found hoard toning, flow lines, minor flaw obverse left field, small edge cracks, weight 2.214 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 11 Mar - 31 Dec 222 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right, hair in waved horizontal ridges, looped plait at back of neck; reverse IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing slightly left, head left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock standing left with head right at feet on left; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $130.00 (119.60)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

|Julia| |Mamaea|, |Julia| |Mamaea,| |Augusta| |13| |March| |222| |-| |February| |or| |March| |235| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Fecunditas (Latin: "fecundity, fertility") was the goddess of fertility. She was portrayed as a matron, sometimes holding a cornucopia or a hasta pura, often with children in her arms or standing next to her.
RS94691. Silver denarius, RIC IV 331, RSC III 5, BMCRE VI 917 ff., Hunter IV 9, SRCV II 8207, Choice VF, dark as-found hoard toning, well centered, nice portrait, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.957 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 232 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in horizontal ridges, with looped plait at the back of neck; reverse FECVND AVGVSTAE, Fecunditas standing slightly left, head left, extending right hand over small boy standing before her, boy nude and raising arms to her, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $130.00 (119.60)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||centenionalis|NEW
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RL94849. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 405 (also 3rd officina), RIC VII Antioch 63 (R1), LRBC I 1333, SRCV IV 16267, Cohen VII 454, Choice gVF, well centered, highlighting desert patina, weight 2.578 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 325 - 326 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (to the foresight of the two emperors), campgate with two turrets, no door, star above, SMANTΓ in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $130.00 (119.60)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Trajan,| |25| |January| |98| |-| |8| |or| |9| |August| |117| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||dichalkon|
In 112, one or the greatest Roman historians, Publius Cornelius Tacitus, was Governor of the Roman province of Asia (in Anatolia). The surviving portions of his two major works - the Annals and the Histories - examine the reigns of the Roman Emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors.
RX93583. Bronze dichalkon, RPC Online III 4774 (9 spec.); SNG BnF IV 1178, Dattari-Savio 7249, Kampmann 27.525, Emmett 726 (R5), Geissen -, SNG Cop -, Choice VF, nice dark near black patina with earthen highlighting, some porosity, ragged irregular edge, reverse edge beveled, weight 1.701 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 112 - 28 Aug 113 A.D.; obverse laureate head right; reverse oinochoe (one-handled jug for pouring wine), L - Iς (year 16) flanking in lower fields; scarce; $125.00 (115.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||follis|NEW
In 317, Licinius recognized Constantine I as senior emperor and executed Valerius Valens.
RL94847. Billon follis, Hunter V 206 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Rome 78 (R1), SRCV IV 16102, Cohen VII 536, Choice VF, attractive desert patina, well centered, reverse flatly struck, weight 3.150 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 225o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 317 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing half left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, A left, RP in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $120.00 (110.40)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, Second Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |Second| |Punic| |War,| |211| |-| |206| |B.C.||quadrans|NEW
The Second Punic War was between Carthage and the Roman Republic from 218 to 201 B.C. Hannibal made a surprising crossing of the Alps and, reinforced by Gallic allies, delivered crushing victories over Roman armies in the battle of the Trebia, the giant ambush at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. Many Roman allies went over to Carthage. Against Hannibal's tactical genius, the Romans used the Fabian strategy. Rome blocked attempts to reinforce Hannibal and, more capable in siegecraft, recaptured all of the major cities that had defected. Meanwhile, Scipio Africanus took Carthago Nova and ended Punic rule in Iberia. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa. Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, harsh terms were imposed, and Carthage became a Roman client-state.
RR93642. Copper quadrans, Crawford 56/5, Sydenham 143c, BMCRR Rome 255, RBW Collection 1244, SRCV I 1037, F, green patina, light marks, light earthen deposits, light corrosion, weight 7.274 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, Second Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA above, three pellets below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 (101.20)


Lot of 5 Roman Provincial Bronze Coins of Antioch Syria, c. 200 - 250 A.D.

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Lot| |of| |5| |Roman| |Provincial| |Bronze| |Coins| |of| |Antioch| |Syria,| |c.| |200| |-| |250| |A.D.||Lot|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity, for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Antioch was renamed Theoupolis after it was nearly destroyed by an earthquake on 29 November 528. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east. 6th Century Antioch
LT88499. Bronze Lot, 5 Roman provincial coins of Antioch, Syria, 17.1mm - 23.0mm, Nice VF, desert patinas with highlighting earthen deposits, no additional identification, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $105.00 (96.60)




  



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