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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Antiquities| ▸ |Central Asian Antiquities||View Options:  |  |  |   

Central Asian Antiquities
Indus Valley, Bronze Combination Cloak Pin and Mirror, c. 1st Millennium B.C.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |Indus| |Valley,| |Bronze| |Combination| |Cloak| |Pin| |and| |Mirror,| |c.| |1st| |Millennium| |B.C.|,
Bronze mirrors preceded the glass mirrors of today. This type of mirror has been found by archaeologists among elite assemblages from various cultures, from Etruscan Italy to China. In the Indus valley civilization, manufacture of bronze mirrors goes back to 2800 to 2500 B.C.
AL59777. Indus valley, Bronze Pin/Mirror, c. 1st Millenium B.C., 3.25 x 11 inches, mirror with polished circular face with long pin handle, nice example, from a New Jersey collection, purchased from a European dealer (c. 1980's); very rare; SOLD


Indus Valley, Bichrome Figural Pot, c. 3rd Millennium B.C.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |Indus| |Valley,| |Bichrome| |Figural| |Pot,| |c.| |3rd| |Millennium| |B.C.|,
The Bronze Age Indus Valley Civilization (3300-1300 BC; mature period 2600-1900 BC) was located in what is now Pakistan and northwest India. It was one of the world's earliest urban civilizations, along with its contemporaries, Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt. At its peak, the Indus Civilization may have had a population of well over five million. Inhabitants developed new techniques in handicrafts (carnelian products, seal carving) and metallurgy (copper, bronze, lead, and tin). The civilization is noted for its cities built of brick, with roadside drainage systems and multistoried houses.
AB59761. Indus Valley, bichrome figural pot, c. 3rd millennium B.C.; 2.5 x 2.5 inches, painted with a register of numerous small ibex within linear bands, some lime deposits (attesting authenticity); from a New Jersey collection; SOLD


India, Stone Head of a Bodhisattva, c. 10th Century A.D.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |India,| |Stone| |Head| |of| |a| |Bodhisattva,| |c.| |10th| |Century| |A.D.|,
The bodhisattva, a popular subject in Buddhist art, is someone who, motivated by great compassion, has a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings. In early Indian Buddhism, bodhisattva usually referred specifically to the Buddha Shakyamuni in his former lives.
AH59766. India, stone head of a bodhisattva, 11 cm tall, c. 10th century A.D., from New Jersey collection, purchased from a European dealer (c. 1980's); SOLD


Indus Valley, Terracotta Humped Bull, c. 2500 - 1500 B.C.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |Indus| |Valley,| |Terracotta| |Humped| |Bull,| |c.| |2500| |-| |1500| |B.C.|,
AE61808. Indus valley terracotta bull; 4.5 inches; attached to vessel shard which now serves as a base, c. 2500 - 1500 B.C.; SOLD


India, Stone Head of a Bodhisattva, c. 10th Century A.D.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |India,| |Stone| |Head| |of| |a| |Bodhisattva,| |c.| |10th| |Century| |A.D.|,
The bodhisattva, a popular subject in Buddhist art, is someone who, motivated by great compassion, has a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings. In early Indian Buddhism, bodhisattva usually referred specifically to the Buddha Shakyamuni in his former lives.
AH59768. India, stone head of a bodhisattva, 9 cm tall, c. 10th century A.D., ex New Jersey collection, ex European dealer (c. 1980); SOLD


India, Ornate Bronze Seal, c. 16th - 17th Century A.D.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |India,| |Ornate| |Bronze| |Seal,| |c.| |16th| |-| |17th| |Century| |A.D.|,
AE61803. India, seal; 1.7 x 2 inches; finely cast filligree openwork; from a New Jersey collection, excellent condition, rare; SOLD


Indus Valley, Terracotta Mother Goddess Bust, 3rd Millennium B.C.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |Indus| |Valley,| |Terracotta| |Mother| |Goddess| |Bust,| |3rd| |Millennium| |B.C.|,
Fertility cults were common in the prehistoric cultures of the Indus Valley and adjacent regions. Invariably female figurines were involved, commonly referred to as Mother Goddesses. Female figurines made in terracotta have been found at many sites including Nausharo in the Kacchi Plains, Nindowari in the Baluchistan Highlands, and Moenjodaro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley.
AE61835. Mother goddess bust, fragment from full figure, SOLD


Indus Valley, Terracotta Mother Goddess Bust, 3rd Millennium B.C.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |Indus| |Valley,| |Terracotta| |Mother| |Goddess| |Bust,| |3rd| |Millennium| |B.C.|,
Fertility cults were common in the prehistoric cultures of the Indus Valley and the adjacent regions. Invariably female figurines were involved, which are commonly referred to as Mother Goddesses. Female figurines made in terracotta have been found in a large number sites including Nausharo in the Kacchi Plains of Eastern Baluchistan, Nindowari in the Baluchistan Highlands, and Moenjodaro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley.
AE61806. Mother goddess bust, fragment from full figure, 5 cm, SOLD


Mehrgarh Culture, Early Polychrome Chalice, c. 4000 B.C.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |Mehrgarh| |Culture,| |Early| |Polychrome| |Chalice,| |c.| |4000| |B.C.|,
The Indus Valley Civilization was not the first settled culture in the Indian subcontinent. The earlier Mehargarh culture was located in present day Pakistan about 125 miles from the Indus Valley. The site was first occupied around 7,000 or 8,000 B.C. It started out as a small village. The initial settlement practiced farming and raised crops, including wheat. As the community grew, farming continued, but the economy expanded and large scale trading began. Evidence shows that it traded with peoples far to the west. The goods included turquoise, cotton, and copper. Commerce was carried on with places as far away as Arabia. By 5,000 B.C. the Mehargarh people were living in mud brick houses and then built large permanent dwellings. Trade was the main aspect of the economy. The Mehargarh culture continued to exist well past 4,000 B.C. Hence it must have traded with the Indus Valley Civilization, which was in existence by then.
AD59760. Mehrgarh Culture, early polychrome chalice, c. 4000 B.C.; 3.5 inches; painted uncertain animals, perhaps dogs; from a New Jersey collection, extremely rare!; SOLD


India, Stone Head of a Bodhisattva, c. 10th Century A.D.

|Central| |Asian| |Antiquities|, |India,| |Stone| |Head| |of| |a| |Bodhisattva,| |c.| |10th| |Century| |A.D.|,
The bodhisattva, a popular subject in Buddhist art, is someone who, motivated by great compassion, has a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings. In early Indian Buddhism, bodhisattva usually referred specifically to the Buddha Shakyamuni in his former lives.
AH59767. India, stone head of a bodhisattva, 9.5 cm tall, c. 10th century A.D., ex New Jersey collection, ex European dealer (c. 1980); SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Casal, J. "Mundigak: l'Afghanistan l'aurore des civilisations" in Archeologia, No. 13, Nov. 1966, pp. 30 - 37.
Tripathi, V. & Srivastava, A. The Indus Terracottas. (New Delhi, 2014).
Urmila, S. Terracotta Art of Rajasthan (From Pre-Harappan and Harappan Times to the Gupta Period). (New Delhi, 1997).
Zwalf, W. ed. Buddhism Art and Faith. (New York, 1985).

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