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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Denominations| ▸ |Eastern Denarii||View Options:  |  |  |   

Eastern Denarii

Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
SH28187. Silver denarius, cf. Lanz 114, 447 and CNG 61, 1848 (both with different obv legends); cf. RIC IV 29 for rev type (based on BMC specimen which doesn't actually exist), gVF but softly struck, weight 3.105 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse [IMP CAES C] PESCE NIGER IVSTI AV, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna standing left, grounded long palm vertical in right, cornucopia in left; extremely rare; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM

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Speculatores served the legions as spies, scouts, messengers, lookouts, and executioners. Aboard ship speculatores stood watch as lookouts in a turret (specula) at the stern, explaining their unusual standards. Normally ten speculatores were assigned to each legion. Anthony formed a separate cohort of speculatores which served him personally and also acted as his personal bodyguard. Augustus would later create a speculatorian cohort at Rome to serve as the inner corps of the praetorian guard. This coin probably refers to the naval equivalent, who were comparable to the Marines and provided a shipboard bodyguard for Antony.
SH76389. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1484, Crawford 544/12, Sydenham 1214, BMCRR II East 185, RSC I 6, Sear CRI 386, Choice VF, well centered on full flan, toned, banker's mark and V graffito on obverse, scratches, weight 3.636 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Patrae(?) mint, autumn 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with fluttering banners at prow, border of dots; reverse CHORTIS SPECVLATORVM, three standards, each decorated with two wreaths and a model war galley prow, border of dots; ex CNG auction 76/2 (12 Sep 2007), lot 3262; ex John A. Seeger Collection; this ex-Forum coin is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum; rare; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI - Ferrata, the "Ironclad"

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The VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad," was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It was retained by Augustus and later served in Syria and Judaea. The VI Victrix, on the other hand, was one of Octavian's legions. This Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus issued a 'restitution' of the type, presumably in connection with the latter's Eastern campaigns.
SH76382. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/19, Sydenham 1223, BMCRR II East 197, RSC I 33, Sear CRI 356, Choice EF, near perfect centering, light toning, slightly uneven strike, contact marks, areas of porosity and light corrosion, weight 3.664 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Forum (2005); SOLD


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, Spring - Early Summer 41 B.C.

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The moneyer M. Barbatius was a friend of Julius Caesar. In 41 B.C. he was a quaestor pro praetore to Antony in the East.

In 41 B.C., Lucius Antonius, Mark Antony's younger brother, and Fulvia, Mark Antony's wife, anxious to get her husband back from Cleopatra, raised eight legions against Octavian. Lucius marched on Rome, drove out Lepidus, and promised the people that the triumvirate would be abolished. On the approach of Octavian, he retired to Perusia in Etruria, where he was besieged by three armies, and compelled to surrender in the winter of 41 B.C. The city was destroyed but Lucius was spared, and was sent by Octavian to Spain as governor. Nothing is known of the circumstances or date of his death.
SH57461. Silver denarius, Crawford 517/2, Sydenham 1181, BMCRR East 103, Sear CRI 243, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, SRCV I 1504, gVF, flat strike areas, weight 3.816 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, military mint moving with Antony, Ephesus(?) mint, spring - early summer 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV ligate), bare head of Antony right; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right; scarce; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
RS77202. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 1457; BMCRE II 475; RSC II 277; RPC II 853, gVF, excellent portrait, toned, some luster in recesses, tight flan, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.275 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, Ephesus mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P, laureate head right; reverse PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory advancing right, filleted wreath raised in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; star lower right, annulet below; very rare; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
SH33430. Silver denarius, BMCRE V277 - 278 var. (obverse legend), RSC III 27 ff. var. (same), RIC IV 188 var. (same), EF, weight 3.381 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FELIX AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FELICITAS TEMP, galley with sail right, containing eight rowers and pilot holding rudder, acrostolium and standard at stern, sail or standard at prow; the finest example of the type FORVM has seen and a rare obverse variety (full spelling for FELIX instead of FEL); SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG III

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This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion.
SH76381. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMCRR II East 193, RSC I 28, Sear CRI 350, Choice gVF, full circle centering on a broad flan, dark patina, areas of light corrosion, weight 3.586 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, fall 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - III, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Knker auction 111 (18 Mar 2006), lot 6511; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

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Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
SH42461. Silver denarius, RPC II 843, RIC II Vesp 1440, RSC II 39, gVF/EF, weight 2.926 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, as caesar, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMPERATOR I CAESAR AVGVSTI F, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA AVG (harmony of the Emperor), Ceres seated left on ornate chair, grain in right hand, scepter in left hand, EPE in exergue; obverse a little rough, reverse very sharp; very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, Spring - Early Summer 41 B.C.

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The moneyer M. Barbatius was a friend of Julius Caesar. In 41 B.C. he was a quaestor pro praetore to Antony in the East.

In 41 B.C., Lucius Antonius, Mark Antony's younger brother, and Fulvia, Mark Antony's wife, anxious to get her husband back from Cleopatra, raised eight legions against Octavian. Lucius marched on Rome, drove out Lepidus, and promised the people that the triumvirate would be abolished. On the approach of Octavian, he retired to Perusia in Etruria, where he was besieged by three armies, and compelled to surrender in the winter of 41 B.C. The city was destroyed but Lucius was spared, and was sent by Octavian to Spain as governor. Nothing is known of the circumstances or date of his death.
SH68247. Silver denarius, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, BMCRR II East 103, Sydenham 1181, Crawford 517/2, SRCV I 1504, aVF, well centered, weight 3.739 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, military mint moving with Antony, Ephesus(?) mint, spring - early summer 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV ligate), bare head of Antony right; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare beardless head of Octavian right; rare; SOLD


Marcus Antonius and Lucius Antonius, 41 B.C.

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Lucius Antonius was the younger brother and supporter of Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony). Together with his older brothers, Marcus and Gaius, Lucius spent his early years in bad company. Plutarch writes of the untamed life of the youths and their friends, frequenting gambling houses and drinking too much. In 44 B.C., the year of Julius Caesar's assassination, Lucius was a tribune of the plebs. In 41 B.C., he was consul with Publius Servilius Vatia. With Marcus Antonius' wife, Fulvia, he raised an eight legion army to fight against Octavian. Lucius and Fulvia ended besieged in Perusia in the winter of 41/40 BC, where they were forced to surrender by starvation. Octavian destroyed the city and Fulvia and Lucius were exiled. -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Antonius
SH32210. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1509, RSC I Antonia 48, BMCRR II East 107, Crawford 517/5a, VF, rough, toned, weight 3.687 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 45o, Ephesus mint, 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M NERVA PROQ P, bare head of Marcus Antonius right; reverse L ANTONIVS COS, bare head of Lucius Antonius, consul 41 B.C., right; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 21, 2019.
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Eastern Denarii