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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Hercules||View Options:  |  |  |   

Hercules (Herakles)

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SL89735. Silver drachm, Price P56, SNG München 947, SNG Cop 1105, HGC 3.1, 974e (S), Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC MS, 5/5 strike, 5/5 surface, fine style (4629644-013), weight 4.26 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, struck under Menander or Kleito, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, IAT monogram left, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right; ex Giessener Munzhandlung D. Gorny GmbH; $750.00 (€660.00)
 


Alabanda, Caria, c. 162 - 161 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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Alabanda was on the river Marsyas, about twenty miles south of its confluence with the Maeander. It allied with Rome in the war against Philip V of Macedon, c. 197 B.C. Antiochus III took it soon after and renamed it Antiocheia until his defeat in 190 B.C. at the battle of Magnesia. Price dated this series of Alexandrine tetradrachms beginning in 173 B.C. and ending in 167 B.C., when Alabanda was defeated after invading Rhodian territory. Cohen begins the era in 167 B.C., after Caria and Lycia were declared free by the Roman Senate.
SH91501. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2466, Müller Alexander 1148, SNG Cop 757, Cohen DCA 311, Choice VF, centered on a very broad flan, toned, light graffiti (MENA?) in obverse right field, weight 16.484 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alabanda (Doganyurt, Aydin, Turkey) mint, c. 162 - 161 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Pegasos flying left in lower left field, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, (year 6) under throne; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $500.00 (€440.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91995. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 82.2d, Price 3756, SNG Saroglos 649, Müller Alexander 741, HGC 9 10f, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, VF, superb style in sculptural high-relief, light marks, graffiti on reverse upper left, tight flan, obverse off center, weight 17.110 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI over crescent horns upward in left field, MYHP monogram within wreath under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; ex FORVM (2009); $500.00 (€440.00)
 


Arados, Phoenicia, 200 - 190 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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In 259 B.C., Arados increased her autonomy and dominated a federation of nearby cities including Gabala, Karne, Marathos and Simyra. Thus began the era of Aradus, to which the subsequent coins of the city are dated. Arados was not completely independent, however, the Seleukids retained overlordship.

Arados struck Alexandrine tetradrachms with a palm tree left and Phoenician dates from 243 to 205 B.C. and then with Greek dates from 202 to 167 B.C. They were not struck every year.
GS85703. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3390 ff., Mektepini 614 ff.; Duyrat 1270 ff., Cohen Dated 771, gVF, attractive style, reverse double struck, earthen encrustations, weight 17.039 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, c. 200 - 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, palm tree with two bunches of dates in left field under arm, AP monogram under throne, uncertain Greek additive date (60 - 69?) below; $380.00 (€334.40)
 


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 250 - 175 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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Mesembria, Nesebar Bulgaria today, was a Doric settlement on a Black Sea island just off mainland Thrace. Thrace was invaded by the Galatians in 279 B.C. Only the wealthy coastal cities, including Mesembria, withstood their attacks. Following that chaos, rule of Thrace was divided between many tribes. Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C., tried to regain control of the area for the Macedonian Kingdom, but his success was limited and short lived. Mesembria was taken by Mithradates VI in the First Mithradatic War and surrendered to Rome in 71 B.C. The city struck Alexandrine tetradrachms as early as 275 B.C., more than 50 years after Alexander's death, and probably issued the very last Alexandrine tetradrachms struck anywhere, possibly under Roman rule as late as 65 B.C.
SH91294. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 83 & pl. VI, 21 - 22 (O7/R10, same die break on exergue line); Price 992; Müller Alexander 436, Mektepini 9, HGC 3.2 1567 (R1), VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, light toning, weight 17.003 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 30o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 250 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over (ΠA monogram) in inner left field under arm; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Odessos, Thrace, c. 280 - 200 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) was created when Miletian Greeks founded an apoikia (trading post) at an existing Thracian settlement around 600 B.C. Odessos was in the Delian league in the 5th century B.C. Philip II besieged it unsuccessfully in 339. Getae priests persuaded him to make a treaty but the city surrendered to his son Alexander the Great in 335. In 313 B.C., in coalition with other Pontic cities and the Getae, Odessos rebelled against Lysimachus. After Lysimachus' death in 281, the city reverted to striking in the types and names of Alexander the Great and continued to strike Alexandrine tetradrachms until at least 70 B.C. After the Battle of Pydna in 168 B.C., Thrace passed to Rome. The Thracians, however, did not all readily accept Roman dominion. Several revolts occurred. The next century and a half saw the slow development of Thracia into a permanent Roman client state.
SH91295. Silver tetradrachm, Black Sea Hoard 311 - 312 (OK/R32), Price 1160, AMNG II 2116, HGC 3.2 1584, Müller Alexander -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, tight flan, light toning, weight 16.621 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, c. 280 - 200 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, K∆ monogram (magistrate) below arm, O∆H Odessos monogram under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 250 - 175 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH91296. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 83 & pl. VI, 21 - 22 (O7/R10, same die break on exergue line); Price 992; Müller Alexander 436, Mektepini 9, HGC 3.2 1567 (R1), VF, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, light marks, struck with a slightly dirty reverse die, weight 16.601 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 30o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 250 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over (ΠA monogram) in inner left field under arm; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Price dates this type 311 - 305 B.C. Houghton dates it 311 - 300 B.C. Houghton notes that Kritt down-dated the chronology due to the complexity of the emissions and that two hoards independently support the revised dating.
GS91298. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 82(3)e, Price 3761b (same rev. die), SNG München 796 (same), Müller Alexander 748, HGC 9 10f, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, gVF, well centered, bold strike with high relief dies, speckled toning, tiny edge splits, weight 16.865 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 30o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress forelegs tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI over rudder left, MYPT monogram (no pellet in P) in wreath below throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) in exergue; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306 - 286 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck by Demetrius I Poliorketes (The Besieger). Demetrius I, the son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, was given the title king by his father in 306 B.C. after he defeated Ptolemy I at the Battle of Salamis. In 294 he seized the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V. The combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, forced him out of Macedonia in 288. Abandoned by his troops on the field of battle he surrendered to Seleucus in 286 and died in captivity in 283 B.C.
GS91299. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3546, Newell Tyrus 16, Hersh Tyrus 1, Müller Alexander -, VF, struck with sculptural high-relief dies, flow lines, obv. off center, tight flan, light marks, mild porosity, die wear, die break rev. 5:00, tiny edge splits, weight 16.831 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, c. 301 - 286 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on high-backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, monogram in circle left, monogram in circle under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS91301. Silver tetradrachm, In the name of Alexander; Price 3726, Müller Alexander 728, SNG Cop 840, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, VF, struck with attractive style sculptural high-relief dies, centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, bumps, light scrapes, weight 16.808 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, under the satrap Peithon, 315 - 311 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, forelegs tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue, Zeus seated left on high backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, (AX monogram) left, MYHP monogram in wreath (no pellet in the P) under throne; $350.00 (€308.00)
 




  



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REFERENCES

Stoll, R. Herakles auf römischen Münzen. (Trier, 1999).
Voegtli, H. Bilder der Heldenepen in der kaiserzeitlichen griechischen Munzprägung. (Aesch, 1977).

Catalog current as of Friday, October 18, 2019.
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Hercules