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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Denominations| ▸ |Greek Fractions||View Options:  |  |  |   

Greek Silver Fractions
Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 333 B.C.

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |333| |B.C.||obol|
Meshorer-Qedar lists Athena on the obverse, but on the three specimens known to FORVM it is clear that Athena is on the reverse. The types copy contemporary Cypriot stater types from Kition (obverse) and Lapethus (reverse).
GS95808. Silver obol, Meshorer-Qedar 102, cf. Sofaer Collection 63 (hemiobol), HGC 10 -, VF, well centered, toned, struck with worn dies (as are all specimens of this type known to FORVM), weight 0.65 g, maximum diameter 8 mm, die axis 10o, Samaria (10 km NW of Nablus, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse lion right atop and attacking a stag fallen right, (Aramaic 'šn', abbreviating Samarian) above; reverse head of Athena facing, wearing crested Attic helmet; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 11 (22 Feb 2020), lot 1128; ex Canaan Collection; only three sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades (and one of the three is this coin); very rare; $450.00 SALE |PRICE| $405.00
 


Massalia, Gaul, c. 475 - 460 B.C.

|Gaul|, |Massalia,| |Gaul,| |c.| |475| |-| |460| |B.C.||obol|
Massalia (Marseille) is the oldest city of modern France, and was founded around 600 BC by Greeks from the Asia Minor city of Phocaea.
GA95211. Silver obol, Chevillon OBM-1 (fig. 29); Brenot Period 2, 1; Furtwängler Massalia, Em. VI, pl. III, 4; De La Tour 511; SNG Cop -, gVF, toned, nice metal, weight 0.889 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Massalia mint, 475 - 465/460 B.C.; obverse archaic head of Apollo left; reverse crab, M below; ex Forum (2016), ex CNG e-auction 368 (10 Feb 2016), lot 4; ex Poindessault-Vedrines (31 March 1997), lot 339.; very rare; $430.00 SALE |PRICE| $387.00
 


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Timoleon| |and| |the| |Third| |Democracy,| |c.| |344| |-| |317| |B.C.||dilitron|
Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
GI95238. Silver dilitron, SNG ANS 518; SNG Cop 717; SNG Munchen 1126; BMC Sicily p. 186, 283; Weber 1644; HGC 2 1373 (R2), VF, well centered, very dark toning, porosity, edge crack, weight 1.226 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 344 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate Janiform female head, ΣYPAKOΣI-ΩN upward on left, two dolphins nose to nose on right; reverse horse galloping right, barley ear right above, N below; ex Forum (2018); rare; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00
 


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 330 - 270 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Argos,| |Argolis,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece,| |c.| |330| |-| |270| |B.C.||triobol| |or| |hemidrachm|NEW
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GS95949. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Peloponnesos I (LHS 96) 1092 (same dies); BMC Peloponnesus p. 141, 57; HGC 5 668 (S) corr., SNG Cop -, Choice VF, old cabinet toning, light marks, weight 2.704 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 90o, Argos mint, c. 330 - 270 B.C.; obverse forepart of wolf at bay left; reverse large A, club below, A - P flanking above, all within an incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $360.00 (€331.20) ON RESERVE


Lesbos, 5th - 4th Century B.C.

|Lesbos|, |Lesbos,| |5th| |-| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||1/3| |stater|
The specific satrap has not been confirmed.
SL95876. Billon 1/3 stater, BMC Lesbos 58, pl. XXXI, 3; SNG Cop -; Winzer -, NGC VG, Strike 4/5; Surface 2/5 (5872605-037), weight 3.90 g, maximum diameter 14 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain Lesbos mint, 5th - 4th Century B.C.; obverse youthful male head (satrap?) left, wearing tight-fitting cap; reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; NGC| Lookup; extremely rare; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00
 


Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 85 - 50 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Argos,| |Argolis,| |Peloponnesos,| |Greece,| |c.| |85| |-| |50| |B.C.||triobol| |or| |hemidrachm|NEW
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GS95948. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, BCD Peloponnesos I (LHS 96) 1178, SNG Cop 42, BMC Peloponnesus p. 145, 114; HGC 5 692 (R1), VF, well centered, old cabinet toning, flow lines, some flatness of strike, tiny edge splits, weight 2.475 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Argos mint, magistrate Hieron, c. 85 - 50 B.C.; obverse forepart of wolf left; reverse large A, I-E/P-Ω/NO-Σ in three lines across field, eagle standing right on line below, all in an incuse square; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $250.00 SALE |PRICE| $225.00
 


Persian Cilicia, c. Mid 4th Century B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Persian| |Cilicia,| |c.| |Mid| |4th| |Century| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Ba'al was a title and honorific meaning "owner" or "lord" in the Semitic languages spoken in the northwest Levant during antiquity. It came to be applied to gods, much as Lord is used for God in English today. Inscriptions show that the name Ba'al was particularly associated with the storm and fertility god Hadad and his local manifestations. The Hebrew Bible uses Ba'al in reference to Levantine deities, especially Hadad, who was decried as a false god. That use has been adopted by Christianity and Islam.
GS95807. Silver hemiobol, Göktürk 56, Troxell-Kagan 5, SNG Levante -, SNG BnF -, SNGvA -, aEF, toned, tight flan, light marks, earthen deposits, among the best known, weight 0.376 g, maximum diameter 7.9 mm, uncertain mint, c. 360 B.C.(?); obverse two lion foreparts addorsed, truncations joined at center, both with jaws open and tongue protruding, lotus design above center between heads; reverse laureate, bearded head of Ba’al left, fulmen below, Aramaic inscription ( BL right to left = Ba'al = lord god) behind, all within a shallow round incuse; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 11 (22 Feb 2020), lot 1021; extremely rare; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00
 


Lot of 4 Silver Fractions From Phoenicia, c. 425 - 300 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Lot| |of| |4| |Silver| |Fractions| |From| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |425| |-| |300| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA97055. Silver Lot, 4 silver fractions, c. 0.6g - 0.8g, c. 9mm, $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Ptolemy I, as Satrap, 323 - 305 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Ptolemy| |I,| |as| |Satrap,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.||obol|
Aradus minted coinage in the name of Alexander during his lifetime and shortly after. When Aradus gained autonomy in 259 B.C., the city again minted coinage in the name of Alexander. After the Ptolemaic victory over the Seleukid Kingdom at Raphia in 217 B.C. Aradus fell under the control of Egypt. In 214, Aradus ceased to issue Alexander coinage and struck regal Ptolemaic issues. In 202 B.C., as Ptolemaic power waned, Aradus returned to issuing coinage of Alexander. The last Alexander coinage of Aradus was struck in 166/165 B.C.
GS89324. Silver obol, unpublished in references but several known from auctions, CNG e-auction 201, lot 34 (same dies), VF, toned, earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 0.649 g, maximum diameter 9.0 mm, die axis 13.5o, Phoenicia, Aradus mint, c. 323 - 315 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style) eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, A/P monogram (control) left; from a New England collector; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 450 - 350 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |c.| |450| |-| |350| |B.C.||diobol|NEW
(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GS97447. Silver diobol, SNG BM 268 ff., SNG Cop 653, SGCV I 1673, gVF, obverse a little off center, tiny edge split, weight 1.238 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 0o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 450 - 350 B.C.; obverse crested Corinthian officer's helmet facing; reverse M-E-T-A (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) counterclockwise, in the four quarters of a radiate wheel (solar disk?); $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 




  



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