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High Grade Ancient Coins

When first introduced to ancient coins, most people are shocked to learn that some coins remain in mint state and even more surprised to learn that they are not all in musuems. Ancient people did not have stocks, bonds mutual funds, or bank accounts. The primary implement for holding wealth was coins, often buried, and often buried in uncirculated or mint state condition. If an owner died without recovering their coins or telling an heir where to find them, they were lost. Millions of ancient coins have been recovered, and thousands have been found in superb condition.


City of Rome Commemorative, 332 - 333 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79229. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 542, LRBC I 65, SRCV IV 16488, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V 1 var. (1st officina), Choice EF, full circles strike on a broad flan, porosity, small edge split, weight 2.689 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, TRS in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 20 May 325, Constantine I summoned an ecumenical council of bishops in Nicaea (the First Council of Nicaea). The Nicene Creed declares that the members of the Trinity (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit) are equal. The council also decided that Easter would be celebrated on the first Sunday after the 21st of March.
RL84296. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 452, LRBC I 16, Cohen VII 125, SRCV IV 16792, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, some silvering, slightly clashed reverse die, weight 3.590 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 324 - 325 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (to the foresight of the two princes), campgate with two turrets, no door, star above, PTR in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (68.00)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared the nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa in the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RT85604. Billon follis, Hunter V 123 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Nicomedia 13 (R1), SRCV IV 15216, Cohen VII 71, EF, well struck and centered on a tight flan, attractive toned brown surfaces, light marks, weight 3.879 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 313 - 317 A.D.; obverse IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over left shoulder, Victory standing on globe and offering wreath in Zeus' right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, A right, SMN in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, I, QXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "I" in the reverse field is the fourth letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "Q" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the fourth officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA62615. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 509, EF, weight 3.910 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 281 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left; reverse MARTI PACIF (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars advancing left, holding olive-branch, shield and spear, I left, QXXI in exergue; sharp strike with full silvering, some hoard patina remaining; $75.00 (63.75)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army." Western mint GLORIA EXERCITVS issues are much less common than the Eastern mint issues.
RL79205. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 60, RIC VII Trier 537, SRCV IV 16335, Cohen VII 254, Choice EF, nearly as struck, mint luster, weight 2.135 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; $75.00 (63.75)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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RIC only lists this reverse with a laurel and rosette diademed bust.
RL79335. Billon reduced centenionalis, LRBC I 79, SRCV IV 16336, Cohen VII 254, RIC VII Trier 555 (R4) var. (laurel and rosette diadem), Choice EF, nice portrait, weight 2.582 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 333 - 334 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; very rare; $75.00 (63.75)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84285. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 65 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, aEF, well centered and struck, light porosity, edge split and edge crack, weight 2.792 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, STR crescent in exergue; $75.00 (63.75)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army."
RL79132. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 244 (R2), LRBC I 187, SRCV V 17318, Cohen VII 122, EF, dark green patina, some mint luster, weight 2.095 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; scarce; $70.00 (59.50)


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79133. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 246 (R2), LRBC I 191, SRCV V 16449, Cohen VII 21, Hunter V -, Choice EF, full circle centering, centers a little weak, weight 2.342 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; scarce; $70.00 (59.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to "the glory of the Army." Western mint GLORIA EXERCITVS issues are much less common than the Eastern mint issues.
RL79156. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 262 (R4), LRBC I 202, SRCV IV 16339, Cohen VII 254, Choice EF, nearly perfect but for some die wear, mint luster, weight 2.531 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORI-A EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, *PLG in exergue; rare; $70.00 (59.50)




    



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High Grade Ancient Coins