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High Grade Ancient Coins

When first introduced to ancient coins, most people are shocked to learn that some coins remain in mint state and even more surprised to learn that they are not all in musuems. Ancient people did not have stocks, bonds mutual funds, or bank accounts. The primary implement for holding wealth was coins, often buried, and often buried in uncirculated or mint state condition. If an owner died without recovering their coins or telling an heir where to find them, they were lost. Millions of ancient coins have been recovered, and thousands have been found in superb condition.


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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Open civil war between Constantine and Licinius broke in 316 when Constantine invaded Licinius' Balkan provinces. Licinius fled to Adrianople where he collected a second army, under the command of Valerius Valens whom he raised to the rank of Augustus. Constantine defeated Licinius at the Battle of Campus Ardiensis, but the victory was indecisive. A treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. The peace lasted for about seven years.
RL77097. Billon follis, RIC VII Trier 121, SRCV IV 15194, Cohen VII 49, EF, fantastic portrait and reverse style, weight 3.642 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 316 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), Genio standing left, crown of city walls with gate, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, T left, F right, BTR in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POP ROM dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RL77103. Billon follis, RIC VI Treveri 845b, Hunter V 5, SRCV IV 15191, Cohen VII 53, Choice EF, near perfect full circles strike, slight die wear, tiny edge crack, weight 4.217 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 310 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, T F at sides, PTR in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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Most references describe this bust as laureate and cuirassed. Hunter V breaks from tradition and correctly recognizes that the loop on the left shoulder indicates drapery, the paludamentum. To avoid confusion, we use the traditional description omitting "draped" from the description.
RL77105. Billon follis, RIC VI Londinium 209c, Hunter V 1, SRCV IV 15183, Cohen VII 53, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, well centered, green patina with coppery high spot on obverse, some reverse die wear, weight 4.183 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POP ROM (to the guardian spirit of the Roman people), Genius standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star right, PLN in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84283. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 65 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, Choice EF, sharp attractive portrait, well centered and struck, some porosity, weight 3.173 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, STR crescent in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84286. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 63 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, Choice gVF, well centered and struck, nice dark patina and surfaces, flan crack, weight 2.709 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, PTR crescent in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84287. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 65 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, Choice EF, attractive surfaces, nice portrait, some flatness of strike on reverse, small edge split, weight 3.058 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, STR crescent in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 281 A.D., Probus returned to Rome, where he celebrated his triumph over the Vandals and the usurpers (Bonosus, Julius Saturninus and Proculus).
RA72830. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 215; Cohen VI 739; Hunter IV 54 var. (IMP...); SRCV III 1205 var. (obv. legend and bust); Pink VI-1, pp. 57 - 58, aEF, excellent centering, most silvering remaining, light corrosion, weight 3.956 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, emission 6, 281 A.D.; obverse PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory walking left, raising wreath in extended right hand, trophy of arms in left hand, R thunderbolt ς in exergue; $105.00 (93.45)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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The name and the image of the sun god were frequently displayed on the coins of Rome. Apollo, in particular, was the object of homage in those dreadful times when the spread of plague depopulated the empire. But in the period when paganism was falling to the spread of Christianity, the emperors invoked the sun god Sol more than ever. The last inscription referring to Sol Invictus dates to 387 and there were enough devotees in the 5th century that Saint Augustine found it necessary to preach against them.
RL77106. Billon follis, RIC VII Lyons 1 (S), Bastien XI 537, Cohen VII 536, SRCV IV 16066, Hunter V -, Choice EF, well centered and struck, excellent bust, nice reverse, weight 3.772 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 313 - 314 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing half left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, S - F at sides, PLG in exergue; scarce; $105.00 (93.45)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Deultum, Thrace

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
RP63710. Bronze AE 24, Draganov Deultum 1020 (O104/R501), Jurukova Deultum 291, Varbanov III 2544 (R4), Choice gVF, weight 9.457 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 180o, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IMP GORDI-ANVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL FL PAC - D-EVLT, Tyche-Fortuna standing left, wearing kalathos, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $100.00 (89.00)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101 - 106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town reached its peak during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty.
RP65521. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.26.54.24, AMNG I/I 2039, Varbanov I 3849, cf. BMC Thrace p. 51, 68 ff. (larger, bust, inscription arrangement), SNG Cop -, aEF, weight 2.273 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AY K M AYΠ ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse NI/KOΠ/OΛITΩN / ΠPOC IC/TPON, inscription in five lines within laurel wreath; ex Helios Numismatik auction 7, lot 464; $100.00 (89.00)




    



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High Grade Ancient Coins