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High Grade Ancient Coins

When first introduced to ancient coins, most people are shocked to learn that some coins remain in mint state and even more surprised to learn that they are not all in musuems. Ancient people did not have stocks, bonds mutual funds, or bank accounts. The primary implement for holding wealth was coins, often buried, and often buried in uncirculated or mint state condition. If an owner died without recovering their coins or telling an heir where to find them, they were lost. Millions of ancient coins have been recovered, and thousands have been found in superb condition.


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontiers:
- Nicomedia (northwestern Asia Minor) became capital for Diocletian
- Mediolanum (Milan, near the Alps) became the capital for Maximian
- Augusta Treverorum (Trier, in Germany) became the capital for Constantius Chlorus
- Sirmium (Serbia, on the Danube border) became the capital for Galerius
RA71673. Billon antoninianus, RIC VI Cyzicus 306, Cohen VI 33, SRCV IV 12635, EF, well centered, sharp, some silvering, some legend weak, weight 3.947 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 293 - 294 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM, emperor standing right, holding parazonium or short scepter, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left holding long scepter, B in center, XXI in exergue; $80.00 (71.20)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign, or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RB72409. Silvered antoninianus, Cohen VI 37; RIC V, part 2, 157; Pink VI-1, p. 67; SRCV III 11953 var. (bust); Hunter IV 40 var. (3rd officina), aEF, excellent bust, nice centering and strike, some silvering remains, weight 4.163 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, 7th officina, Rome mint, 5th emission, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP PROBVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse ADVENTVS AVG, Probus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left, bound captive seated left in front of horse below raised right foreleg, R wreath Z in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (71.20)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D., EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, I, VIXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "I" in the reverse field is the fourth letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "VI" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the sixth officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA51609. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 525, EF, centered, much silvering remaining, weight 3.736 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, obverse IMP C PROBVS AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle tipped scepter in right; reverse SECVRIT PERP, Securitas standing left raising right hand to head and resting left elbow on column, I right, VIXXI in exergue; $75.00 (66.75)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is of an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of the Emperor Augustus.
RA73683. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 586a, RIC V S572 (Siscia), RSC IV 265 (Siscia), SRCV III 10219 var. (S in ex), EF, superb portrait, well centered on a tight and slightly irregular flan, weight 2.941 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 225o, 6th officina, Rome mint, 262 - 263 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna standing left, rudder on globe in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, ς right; ex Harlan J. Berk; $75.00 (66.75)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278 A.D., Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the Roman defenses on the Rhine and resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces. He adopted the titles Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RB64525. Billon antoninianus, Alfldi Siscia V type 23, 49; RIC, part 2, V 666; Cohen VI 163; SRCV 11967, EF, weight 4.546 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, emission 4, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse CONCORDIA MILIT, Probus, on left, standing right, Concordia standing confronted clasping hands, XXIQ in exergue; $70.00 (62.30)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 278, Probus defeated the Alamanni, expelled the Franks from Gaul, reorganized the defenses on the Rhine, resettled the Germanic tribes in the devastated provinces of the Roman Empire, and adopted the titles of Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus.
RA67088. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 376; Cohen VI 284; Pink VI-1, p. 63, EF, light corrosion on reverse, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 3.026 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 4th emission, 278 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield decorated with horseman in left; reverse HERCVLI PACIF, Hercules Pacifier standing half left, nude, raising olive-branch in right hand, club and lion skin in left, SXXT in exergue; scarce; $70.00 (62.30)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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During this period A's were frequently engraved with open tops and looked like H's.
RL68311. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Siscia 163, SRCV V 17175, Cohen VII 31, SRCV V 17175, Cohen VII 31, EF, perfect centering, some silvering, weight 2.736 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 320 - 321 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate head right; reverse CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT / V within wreath, ASIS* in exergue; $70.00 (62.30)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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Beginning in 330 A.D., pagan temples were progressively abandoned, destroyed or left to fall into disrepair, except for those that were transformed into Christian churches. In 331 A.D., Constantine confiscated the property and valuables of many pagan temples throughout the Empire.
RL72844. Billon reduced centenionalis, Bastien XIII 200 (34 specimens), RIC VII Lugdunum 240 (R2), LRBC I 57, SRCV V 17668, Cohen VII 104, Choice aEF, well centered on a slightly crowded flan, nearly as struck but reverse die wear, weight 2.640 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; $70.00 (62.30)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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In 332, Constantine I and his son Constantine II, aged 16, defeated the Goths in Moesia. The Goths became Roman allies and protected the Danube frontier.
RL72861. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 527, LRBC I 56, SRCV V 17313, Choice EF, nice portrait, some silvering, very top of some legend letters, weight 2.759 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, as caesar, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; $70.00 (62.30)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280, Julius Saturninus, the governor of Syria, was made emperor by his troops. Probus besiege him at Apamea, where he was captured and executed. Proculus started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and he proclaimed himself emperor. Before the end of the year, Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RB64527. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 666, gVF, weight 3.733 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, emission 7, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILIT, Probus, on left, standing right, and Concordia standing confronted, clasping hands, T in bottom center, XXI in exergue; excellent portrait; $55.00 (48.95)




    



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High Grade Ancient Coins