Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ SculptureView Options:  |  |  | 

Sculpture on Ancient Coins

Many of the images of gods and goddesses on ancient coins were derived from sculptures. The coins on this page depict known sculptures or images that are clearly taken from sculpture.

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
A gilded 2nd century B.C. slightly over-lifesize bronze statue, Hercules of the Forum Boarium, has Hercules in a similar pose. This statue is probably the one mentioned by Pliny, which originally stood in the Temple of Hercules Victor, by the Tiber. It lacks the lion skin. Perhaps a actual lion skin was once draped on it. The sculpture is now in the Musei Capitolini, Rome. Another similar sculpture, from the 2nd Century A.D., the Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey, was discovered in 1864, carefully buried under protective tiles. It was incised FCS (fulgor conditum summanium), indicating that it had been struck by lightning, and had been carefully interred on the spot. The figure lightly supports himself on his grounded vertical club, the skin of the Nemean Lion is draped over his left forearm. This sculpture is now in the round room area of Museo Pio-Clementino, in the Vatican.Hercules_Sculptures

RS86635. Silver denarius, Woytek 100a, RIC II 49, RSC II 234, BMCRE III 86, BnF IV 108, Hunter II 41, Strack I 40, SRCV II -, Choice VF, well centered, toned, light marks, weight 3.393 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 101 - Oct 102 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P COS IIII P P, statue of Hercules standing facing on low base, nude except for lion skin draped over head, shoulders and left arm, club downward in right hand, apples of Hesperides in his left hand; $275.00 (Ä233.75)

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 86, Dacia attacked the Roman province of Moesia. After the attack, Domitian personally went to Moesia and reorganized the province into Moesia Inferior and Moesia Superior. In the summer of 87, five or six legions crossed the Danube to attack Dacia. At Tapae they were ambushed. Almost all of the soldiers from Legio V Alaudae were killed, the Dacians captured their flags and war machines, and general Cornelius Fuscus himself was killed in battle. After this victory, the Dacian king Diurpaneus received the name of Decebalus, meaning as strong (or brave) as ten men.
RS86646. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 507, BMCRE II 103, RSC II 218, BnF III 104, Hunter I 39 corr., SRCV I 2730, Choice VF, superb portrait, well centered and struck, light toning, some die wear, light marks and scratches, weight 3.487 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 1 Sep 87 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI, laureate head right; reverse IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on the capital of a rostral column, helmeted, wearing aegis, brandishing javelin in right hand, shield on left arm, owl at feet on right; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $240.00 (Ä204.00)

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Rabbathmoba-Areopolis, Provincia Arabia

Click for a larger photo
Rabbathmoba, probably the Biblical Ir-Moab, was conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan.
RP84127. Bronze AE 27, Sofaer 5; Spijkerman p. 264, 8; cf. Rosenberger IV 1-3 (bust and legend variations, etc.); SNG ANS 1414 (same), VF, no patina, weight 6.492 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rabbathmoba-Areopolis mint, obverse AVT KAIC Λ CEΠ - CEOVHPOC ΠEB, laureate bust right; reverse RABBAΘM-WBHNWN APHC, cult statue of Ares standing facing in military dress, sword erect in right hand, spear and round shield in left hand, on platform with four legs set on base; rare; $80.00 (Ä68.00)

Argos, Argolis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 280 - 260 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Argos is located in the eastern Peloponnese, very near the Aegean Sea. Inhabitants worshiped Hera. Sparta was a close neighbor to the south but the city was a nominal ally of Athens in the continuous conflict between Athens and Sparta in 5th century B.C.
GB85883. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 1102; Nemea 1644 - 1646, BMC Peloponnesus p. 144, 106; SNG Cop 57; HGC 5 697 (S), VF, green patina, rough corrosion, weight 2.990 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Argos mint, c. 280 - 260 B.C.; obverse head of Hera right, wearing polos inscribed APΓE; reverse Palladion statuette of Athena advancing left, helmeted and draped, shield on raised left arm, hurling javelin with right hand; ex J. Cohen Collection; scarce; $80.00 (Ä68.00)


Catalog current as of Saturday, March 17, 2018.
Page created in 0.923 seconds.