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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ PaphlagoniaView Options:  |  |  | 

Paphlagonia

Paphlagonia was a rugged mountainous area on the Black Sea coast of north central Anatolia, between Bithynia to the west and Pontus to the east. Herodotus names the Paphlagonians among the peoples conquered by Croesus, and they sent an important contingent to the army of Xerxes in 480 B.C. After the death of Alexander the Great, it was assigned, together with Cappadocia and Mysia, to Eumenes. However, it continued to be governed by native princes until it was absorbed by Pontus. It was not until 183 B.C. that Pharnaces took Sinope under their control. From that time, the whole province was incorporated into the kingdom of Pontus until the fall of Mithridates to Rome in 65 B.C.


Kings of Paphlagonia, Pylaimenes Euergetes, c. 140 - 89 B.C.

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In Greek mythology, Pylaemenes was the king of the Eneti tribe of Paphlagonia (a much earlier king, not the king named on this coin). He claimed to be related to Priam through Phineus, as the latter's daughter Olizone was married to Dardanus. He led his Paphlagonian forces to the Trojan War, as a Trojan ally. Pylaemenes was killed in battle by Menelaus of Sparta. He had a son named Harpalion who was killed by Meriones, son of Molus.

The King Pylaemenes Euergetes named on this coin may have been Pylaimenes II (ruled c. 140 - 130 B.C.), who bequeathed his kingdom to Pontus, or Pylaimenes III (ruled c. 108 - 89 B.C.), a son of Nicomedes III, King of Bithynia. The kerykeion symbolized peace and alliance and perhaps indicated that Pylaimenes III desired close relations with Rome.
GB77131. Bronze AE 18, SNG BM 1555; SNGvA 150; Rec Gen I, p. 127 and pl. XVII, 3; BMC Pontus p. 103, 2 and pl. XXIII, 12; SNG Cop -; BMC Stancomb -, VF, well struck, green patina, a little rough, weight 3.905 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, c. 140 - 89 B.C.; obverse head of bull facing; reverse winged kerykeion, BAΣIΛEΩΣ − ΠYΛAIMENOY / EΨEPΓEOY in three downward lines, the first line on the right, concave field; rare; $170.00 (€144.50)
 


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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We have been unable to find another example with this flower(?) or palm(?) control symbol on the reverse.
GB63160. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 311 var., BMC Pontus p. 100, 49 var.; SNG BM 1528 ff. var.; SNG Stancomb 795 var.; SNGvA 227 var. (no refs. with this symbol left), VF, weight 8.575 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse ΣINΩ−ΠHΣ, sword in scabbard, flower(?) or palm(?) lower left; rare, unpublished(?); $85.00 (€72.25)
 


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

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Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of Rűm in 1214.
SH75322. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1484; SNG Stancomb 772; SNG Cop 284, aEF, beautifully toned, fine style, small die crack on obverse, weight 4.975 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 90o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of nymph left, hair in sakkos, wearing triple pendant earring and necklace; reverse eagle with dolphin in talons facing left, ∆IOY (magistrate's name) below wing, ΣINΩ below dolphin; ex Forum (2010), ex Baldwin & Sons, London; SOLD







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REFERENCES

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Brett, A. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
de Callata˙, F. "Le premier monnayage de la cité d'Amastris (Paphlagonie)" in SNR 2004.
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol III, Part 1. (London, 1926).
Head, B. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Phrygia. (London, 1906).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia...5th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
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Tekin, O. The Sivas Hoard, Bronze Coins of Pontos and Paphlagonia from the Reign of Mithradates VI. (Istanbul, 1999).
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Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 24, 2017.
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Paphlagonia Coins