Guest. Please login or register.

MAIN MENU    RECENT ADDITIONS    PRICE REDUCTIONS
ROMAN    GREEK    JUDEAN & BIBLICAL    BYZANTINE
BOOKS & SUPPLIES    COLLECTING THEMES    ANTIQUITIES   

 

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Greek Coins
Greek Coins Showcase

Greek Gold
Archaic Origins (61)
Classical Fine Art (144)
Persian Empire (15)
Celtic & Tribal (28)
Geographic - All Periods (1348)
Hellenistic Monarchies (398)
Greek Imperial (497)
Greek Antiquities (35)
Greek Countermarked (24)
Greek Unattributed
Greek Bulk Lots (6)
Greek Coin Books (129)

Catalog Search
View Shopping Cart
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Contact Us
FAQ

Home>Catalog>GreekCoins>Geographic-AllPeriods>Anatolia>Troas PAGE 1/3123»»»

Troas

The Troad or Troas is the historical name of the Biga Yarimadasi peninsula in the northwestern Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join near the ruins of Troy. The Kingdom of Pergamum ceded the territory to the Roman Republic.


Assos, Troas, c. 480 - 450 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Assos was a harbor city on the Gulf of Adramytteion, just north of the island of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).

An astragalos was a gaming piece, made from the knuckle-bone of a sheep or goat, used in antiquity for divination and games in a manner similar to dice.
GA63461. Silver tetartemorion, Klein 475 (Teos), SNG Kayhan -, BMC Ionia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, VF, broad flan, weight 0.203 g, maximum diameter 6.7 mm, Assos mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse griffin leaping right; reverse astragalos within incuse square; extremely rare; $280.00 (€210.00)

Abydos, Troas, 480 - 450 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Abydos is located on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Dardanelles), at the shortest crossing point, scarcely a mile across from Sestus on the European side. In the Iliad, Abydos was an ally of the Trojans (Iliad ii.836) and it is the mythical home of Leander. Persians occupied it in 514 B.C. and Darius burned it in 512. When he invaded Greece in 480 B.C., Xerxes built his two bridges of boats across the strait from Abydos. Abydos became a member of the Delian League, but revolted against Athens in 411 B.C. It allied itself to Sparta, until 394 B.C. Then it passed under Achaemenid rule until 334. Alexander the Great threw a spear to Abydos while crossing the strait and claimed Asia as his own. Abydos is celebrated for the vigorous resistance it made against Philip V of Macedon in 200 B.C. The city minted coins from the early fifth century B.C. to the mid-third century A.D.
GS68733. Silver obol, SNG Cop 4; Weber 5258; BMC Troas p. 1, 7 var (monogram vice kylix); SNG München 4 var (no kylix); SNGvA -; SNG Kayhan -; Klein -, VF, toned, oval flan, reverse a little flat, weight 0.581 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 270o, Abydos mint, 480 - 450 B.C.; obverse ABY, eagle standing left, wings closed, kylix upper right; reverse facing gorgoneion, tongue protruding, within incuse square; $140.00 (€105.00)

Dardanos, Troas, Late 5th Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo
In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GA68143. Silver obol, SNG Cop 282; SNG Ashmolean 1120; SNGvA -, SNG München -, aVF, darkly toned, weight 0.652 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 0o, Dardanos mint, Late 5th Century B.C.; obverse horseman riding left; reverse cock standing left within incuse square; ex CNG auction 311, lot 675; ex Daniel Koppersmith Collection; ex CNG auction 260, lot 217; rare; $130.00 (€97.50)

Dardanos, Troas, 4th Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo
In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GB67648. Bronze AE 18, BMC Troas p. 48, 4; SNG München 175; SNG Cop 284, aF, thick flan, weight 7.367 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Dardanos mint, 4th Century B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys flying behind; reverse ∆AP, cock right, standing erect, Athena Promachos holding lance and shield in right field; rare; $110.00 (€82.50)

Gergis, Troas, c. 320 - 270 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Gergis, on the north of the river Scamnander in Troas, was believed by some to have been the birthplace of the Sibyl. It was Sybil Herophile who told Herakles that as penance for killing his wife and children in a fit induced by Hera, he was must to carry out twelve tasks set by his arch-enemy, Eurystheus, who had become King in his stead. In the mid-third century B.C., King Attalus of Pergamon transplanted the inhabitants of Gergis to a place called Gergetha or Gergithion, near Larissa in Cyme.
GB66107. Bronze AE 11, SGCV II 4098; SNG Cop 337; SNGvA 1516; BMC Troas p. 55, 3, VF, weight 1.745 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 45o, Gergis mint, c. 320 - 270 B.C.; obverse head of Sibyl Herophile facing slightly right; reverse ΓEP, sphinx with curved wings seated right; $80.00 (€60.00)



ITEMS PER PAGE 13510203050 PAGE 1/3123»»»

OUR FINEST COINS ARE LISTED FIRST. CLICK TO THE LAST PAGE FOR OUR BARGAINS.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bellinger, A. R. Troy, The Coins. (Princeton, 1961).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Müller, Ludwig. Numismatique d’Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Price, M. J. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeusr. (London, 1991).
Sear, David. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 4: Bosporus - Lesbos (Parts 18 - 21). (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 19: Troas-Lesbos. (Berlin, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 3, Canakkale Museum Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 4, Ancient Coins from Mysia, Troad and Aeolis in the Collection of Selcuk Tanrikulu. (Istanbul, 2010).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus," in Essays Robinson.
Waggoner, N. M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Troas, Aeolis and Lesbos. (London, 1894).

Catalog current as of Thursday, April 24, 2014.
Page created in 0.983 seconds
Troas Coins