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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ TroasView Options:  |  |  |   

Troas

The Troad or Troas is the historical name of the Biga Yarimadasi peninsula in the northwestern Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join near the ruins of Troy. The Kingdom of Pergamum ceded the territory to the Roman Republic.


Tiberius and Livia, c. 15 A.D., Uncertain City, North West Anatolia

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RPC I Supplement I 5428 attributes this to "Augustus(?) and Livia" but the use of CEBACTH for Livia identifies this as a coin struck after her elevation to Augusta. She was made Augusta only after the death and last testament of her husband. This type must have been struck during the reign of Tiberius and it is almost certainly his portrait on the obverse.
RP77319. Bronze AE 15, RPC I Supp. I 5428/3 (this coin), F, green patina, light marks, tiny edge crack, small patina edge chip on reverse, weight 1.565 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 135o, probably N.W. Anatolia mint, c. 15 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC, laureate head of Tiberius right; reverse CEBACTH, head of Livia right, hair in looped plait down back of neck; ex Plankenhorn Collection, extremely rare, only three known specimens; $240.00 (€213.60)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Alexandreia Troas, Troas

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Hercules is depicted in the same pose as the Farnese Hercules, a massive marble sculpture, which depicts a muscular yet weary Hercules leaning on his club, which has his lion-skin draped over it. He has just performed the last of The Twelve Labors, which is suggested by the apples of the Hesperides he holds behind his back. The Farnese Hercules is probably an enlarged copy made in the early third century A.D., signed by Glykon, from an original by Lysippos that would have been made in the fourth century B.C. The copy was made for the Baths of Caracalla in Rome (dedicated in 216 AD), where it was recovered in 1546. Today it is in Naples National Archaeological Museum. The statue was well liked by the Romans, and copies have been found in many Roman palaces and gymnasiums.
RP72147. Brass AE 24, Apparently unpublished, perhaps unique; Bellinger Troy -, BMC Troas -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG München -, SNG Tübingen -, SNG Turkey -, Lindgren -, VF, well centered and struck, grainy surfaces, weight 7.816 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 45o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse M AV S AL-EXANDRV, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL AL AVG - TROAD, Hercules standing right, nude, right hand behind back presumably holding apples of the Hesperides, leaning with left hand on his club, which has the Nemean Lion's skin draped over it; the only example known to Forum; $225.00 (€200.25)
 


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 550 - 470 B.C.

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Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid, in the latter as the site where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls. The island was important throughout classical antiquity despite its small size due to its strategic location at the entrance of the Dardanelles. In the following centuries, the island came under the control of a succession of regional powers, including the Persian Empire, the Delian League, Alexander the Great, the Kingdom of Pergamon, the Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, and the Republic of Venice. As a result of the War of Chioggia (1381) between Genoa and Venice the entire population was evacuated and the town was demolished. The Ottoman Empire established control over the deserted island in 1455. During Ottoman rule, it was resettled by both Greeks and Turks. In 1807, the island was temporarily invaded by the Russians. During this invasion the town was burnt down and many Turkish residents left the island.Map of Troas
GS79837. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 506; SNG München 338; BMC Troas p. 91, 4; HGC 6 380 (S); SNGvA -, F, toned, weight 1.644 g, maximum diameter 12.2 mm, die axis 180o, Tenedos mint, c. 550 - 470 B.C.; obverse archaic janiform head, male on left, female on right (Zeus and Hera?); reverse labrys (double axe), TENE∆EOΣ, all within an incuse square; scarce; $225.00 (€200.25)
 


Kebren, Troas, 5th Century B.C.

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Kebren (or Cebren, or Cebrene) was in the middle Skamander valley in the Troad region of Anatolia. Its remains have been located in the forested foothills of Mount Ida (modern Kaz Dagi), approximately 7 km to the south of the Skamander. Archaeological remains suggest that in the mid-7th and early 6th century B.C. Kebren as a mixed Greco-Anatolian community. Writing in the early 4th century B.C., Xenophon implies that the population of Kebren was still both Greek and Anatolian. In the 5th century B.C., Kebren was a member of the Delian League and is listed in the Hellespontine district paying tribute to Athens. Following the defeat of Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 B.C., Kebren came under the control of Zenis, the tyrant of Dardanus, and his wife Mania who together controlled the Troad on behalf of the Persian satrap Pharnabazos. Kebren was captured by the Spartan commander Dercylidas in 399 B.C., but soon after returned to Persian control. In 360 to 359, the Greek mercenary commander Charidemus briefly captured the city before being repelled by the Persian satrap Artabazos. At some point in the 4th century B.C. Kebren produced coinage depicting a satrap's head as the obverse type, indicating the city's close relationship with its Persian overlords. Kebren ceased to exist as an independent city about 310 B.C., when Antigonus I Monophthalmus founded Antigonia Troas (after 301 B.C. renamed Alexandria Troas) and included Kebren in the synoecism.
GA76288. Silver obol, Klein 312, SNG Kayhan 1051 - 1052 (Lykia?), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Troas -, aEF, toned, grainy etched surfaces, weight 0.570 g, maximum diameter 7.3 mm, Kebren mint, 5th Century B.C.; obverse head of ram left; reverse irregularly divided incuse square; rare; $200.00 (€178.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS76130. Silver drachm, Price 1560; ADM II, Series XIX, 375; Müller Alexander 252; SNG Cop 972; SNG Berry 158; SNG München 486, gVF, dark toning, weight 4.163 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 303 - 302 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ME monogram left, ivy leaf under throne; $200.00 (€178.00)
 




  



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REFERENCES

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bellinger, A. R. Troy, The Coins. (Princeton, 1961).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Müller, Ludwig. Numismatique d'Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Price, M. J. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeusr. (London, 1991).
Sear, David. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 4: Bosporus - Lesbos (Parts 18 - 21). (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 19: Troas-Lesbos. (Berlin, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 9: Bosporus - Aeolis. (London, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 3, Canakkale Museum Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 4, Ancient Coins from Mysia, Troad and Aeolis in the Collection of Selcuk Tanrikulu. (Istanbul, 2010).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus," in Essays Robinson.
Waggoner, N. M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Troas, Aeolis and Lesbos. (London, 1894).

Catalog current as of Sunday, September 25, 2016.
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Troas Coins