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Home>Catalog>CollectingThemes>History>EnemiesofRome PAGE 1/212»»»

Enemies of Rome


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.
Click for a larger photo A scarce and popular historical type - the reverse commemorates Claudius' great victory over the Goths at Naissus in Upper Moesia.
BB67670. Billon antoninianus, Normanby Hoard 1107 (1 spec.), RIC V 252 var (draped and SPQR in ex), SRCV III 11381 var (SPQR in ex), Cunetio Hoard -, EF, weight 3.470 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 268 - 270 A.D.; obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate head right, two pellets below; reverse VICTORIAE GOTHIC, two captives seated at the base of a trophy of captured arms; ; very rare; $290.00 (€217.50)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.
Click for a larger photo Personification of the siege of Sarmizegetusa! In 106 A.D., Trajan besieged Sarmizegetusa, the Dacian capital. With the aid of a Dacian traitor, the Romans found and destroyed water pipes supplying the city. Running out of water and food the city fell and was burned to the ground. Decebalus fled but, followed by the Roman cavalry, committed suicide rather than face capture. The river-god on the reverse is usually described as Tiber, however, the reverse likely personifies the impact of the Roman destruction of the Dacian's water supply. Dacia's own water supply has betrayed her, knocked her to the ground, and is choking her.
SH63939. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 556, BMCRE III 793 note, Cohen 526, aF, weight 20.524 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 103 - 111 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVA TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI S C, River-god, cloak billowing behind, leaning left with right knee on supine Dacia, forcing her to the ground, choking her with his right hand, reeds in left; very scarce; $270.00 (€202.50)

Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Second Punic War, c. 215 - 205 B.C.
Click for a larger photo
The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.Battle of Lake Trasimene 217 BC
SH67737. Billon tridrachm, Coin Hoards IX, group 4 (flan cast in a double-sided mold), 97 - 239; cf. Alexandropoulos 44; SNG Cop 190, Müller Afrique 104, SRCV 6494, VF, corrosion on reverse right edge, weight 10.876 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, c. 215 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wearing barley wreath, triple-pendant earing, and necklace with many pendants; reverse unbridled horse standing right, palm tree in background; scarce; $250.00 (€187.50)

Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Second Punic War, c. 215 - 205 B.C.
Click for a larger photo
The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.The Battle of Cannae 215 B.C.
SH67739. Billon tridrachm, Coin Hoards IX, group 4 (flan cast in a double-sided mold), 97 - 239; cf. Alexandropoulos 44; SNG Cop 190, Müller Afrique 104, SRCV 6494, VF, weight 11.102 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, c. 215 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wearing barley wreath, triple-pendant earing, and necklace with many pendants; reverse unbridled horse standing right, palm tree in background; scarce; $250.00 (€187.50)

Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Second Punic War, c. 215 - 205 B.C.
Click for a larger photo
The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.The Battle of Trebia
SH67740. Billon tridrachm, Coin Hoards IX, group 3, 51 - 76; Alexandropoulos 44a; Müller Afrique 104; SNG Cop 190 var (no pellet); SRCV II 6494 var (same), aVF, minor flan flaw on reverse (circle on horse), weight 10.884 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Carthage mint, c. 215 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wearing barley wreath, pellet on leaf, triple-pendant earing, and necklace with many pendants; reverse unbridled horse standing right, palm tree in background, pellet below horse's belly forward of the palm trunk; scarce; $250.00 (€187.50)

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 105, Trajan left with the Imperial Roman fleet from Brundusium, in Apulia, to begin the second expedition against Dacia. In 106, he first conquered the Dacian fortresses in the Orastie Mountains, then defeated the Dacians in the Battle of Sarmizegetusa. After the Romans encircled the city and destroyed the water supply pipes, king Decebalus fled and commited suicide. On 11 August 106, the south-eastern part of Dacia (modern Romania) became a Roman province.
RB70537. Orichalcum sestertius, Woytek 203o, BnF IV 564, RIC II 535 var (draped), BMCRE III -, Cohen -,, aF, weight 23.942 g, maximum diameter 33.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 104 - 107 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan in military dress on horseback right, thrusting spear at Dacian warrior trampled and falling under fore-hooves, S C in exergue; rare with bust left; $150.00 (€112.50)

Judean Kingdom, Mattathias Antigonus (Mattatayah), 40 - 37 B.C.
Click for a larger photo This large bronze type was meant to impress the population and improve support for Antigonus against his rival Herod the Great.
SH55100. Bronze AE 22, Meshorer TJC 36d, Hendin 1162, F, weight 12.936 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, obverse Hebrew inscription, Mattatayah the High Priest and Council of the Jews, around and between the horns of a double cornucopia; reverse BACIΛEΩC ANTIΓONOY (of King Antigonus), ivy wreath tied with ribbons; scarce; $120.00 (€90.00)

Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 350 B.C.
Click for a larger photo By the 4th Century B.C., Sicily had become an obsession for Carthage. For sixty years, Carthaginian and Greek forces engaged in a constant series of skirmishes. By 340 B.C., Carthage had been pushed entirely into the southwest corner of the island, and an uneasy peace reigned over the island.
GB49127. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 121, F, weight 3.177 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 45o, Sicilian? mint, c. 350 B.C.; obverse youthful male head left between two stalks of grain; reverse horse galloping to right; overstruck on a Carthaginian bronze with head of Tanit / horse with palm behind; $110.00 (€82.50)

The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D., Mint Error
Click for a larger photo The reverse on this coin is peculiar. It appears this this coin was overstruck on an older prutah and the reverse die was far off center. There is also a raised band across the reverse face between the two flan casting sprues, a feature found on some unstruck flans. Perhaps it is not overstruck, but rather an old prutah was pushed into the clay to make the mold used to cast the flan.
JD59015. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1363, F, weight 3.113 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, Jerusalem mint, year 3, 68 - 69 A.D.; obverse amphora with broad rim and two handles, year 3 (in Hebrew) around; reverse unstruck with visible undertype effects and remnant of sprue tunnel; $110.00 (€82.50)

Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 400 - 350 B.C.
Click for a larger photo By 400 B.C., Carthage was obsessed with taking Sicily. Over the next sixty years, Carthaginian and Greek forces engaged in a constant series of skirmishes. In 398, Dionysius took the Carthaginian stronghold of Motya. Himilco responded by retaking Motya and capturing Messina. Himilco then laid siege to Syracuse itself. He was close to success in 397, but in 396 a plague ravaged the Carthaginian forces and they collapsed. The fighting swung in favor of Carthage in 387. After winning a naval battle off Catania, Himilco laid siege to Syracuse with 50,000 Carthaginians, but yet another epidemic struck down thousands of them. Dionysius' surprise counterattack destroyed all the Carthaginian ships while most of the men were ashore. At the same time, his ground forces stormed the besiegers' lines. Himilco and his chief officers abandoned their army and fled to Carthage in disgrace. He was very badly received and later committed suicide by starving himself. By 340 B.C., Carthage had been pushed entirely into the southwest corner of the island.
GB66998. Bronze AE 17, Alexandropoulos 18, SNG Cop 109 ff., Müller Afrique 163, SGCV II 6444, VF, earthen encrustation, weight 3.166 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 315o, Sicilian(?) mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wearing barley wreath, triple-pendant earing, and necklace with many pendants; reverse unbridled horse right, date palm tree in center background, three pellets forming a triangle right; $105.00 (€78.75)

Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal
Click for a larger photo Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB67844. Bronze AE 18, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646, Fair, weight 4.075 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 270o, Arpi mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse APΠANΩN, bunch of grapes; rare; $105.00 (€78.75)

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB50614. Bronze AE 22, SNG Alpha Bank 1137, SNG Dreer 628, SNG Cop 1275 ff. var (monogram in ex), SNG München 1202 ff. var (same), VF, scratch on rev, weight 10.273 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 171 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right; reverse eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, B - A above wings flanking the eagles head, ΠEP monogram left, ∆I monogram below; $95.00 (€71.25)

Siculo-Punic, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo Before it was incoporated within the Persian Empire in the 370s B.C., Tyre was the economic and political hub of the Phoenician world. Supremacy passed to Sidon, and then to Carthage, before Tyre's destruction by Alexander the Great in 332 B.C. Each colony paid tribute to either Tyre or Sidon, but neither had actual control. The Carthaginians, however, appointed their own magistrates to rule the towns and took much direct control. This policy would result in a number of Iberian towns siding with the Romans during the Punic Wars.
GB65641. Bronze AE 16, Viola CNP 126, SNG Cop VIII 96 ff. (=SNG Cop I 1022 ff.), SNG München 1626 ff., SNG Morcom 897, Alexandropoulos 15, aVF, rough, nice green patina, weight 5.015 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 270o, Carthage or Sicilian mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse male head left, wreathed in grain, wearing hoop earring; reverse free horse prancing right, short exergual line below rear hooves, linear border; $95.00 (€71.25)

Judean Kingdom, Mattathias Antigonus (Mattatayah), 40 - 37 B.C.
Click for a larger photo The single cornucopia and weight indicate this type was valued at half of Antigonus double cornucopia type. Even so, it is a large bronze compared with the usual Judean prutah denomination.
JD47404. Bronze AE 20, Hendin 1163, Meshorer TJC 37, aVF, weight 7.495 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, Jerusalem mint, obverse Hebrew inscription, Mattatayah the High Priest and Council of the Jews, single cornucopia tied with ribbons, grapes and grape vine hang; reverse BACILEΩC ANTIΓONOY (of King Antigonus), legend within wreath and border of dots; scarce; $70.00 (€52.50)

The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 67, the Nabataean king Malichus II sent an army to help Vespasian in the siege of Jerusalem.
JD59176. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1360, gF, weight 2.616 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, year 2, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse amphora with broad rim and two handles, year 2 (in Hebrew) around; reverse vine leaf on small branch, the freedom of Zion (in Hebrew) around; $70.00 (€52.50)

Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 87 - 86 B.C., Mithradatic War Issue
Click for a larger photo In 87 B.C., Mithridates moved his forces into Greece and established Aristion as a tyrant in Athens. Sulla landed in Epirus and marched through Boeotia into Attica. Most cities declared their allegiance to Rome, foremost among them Thebes. Athens, however, remained loyal to Mithridates. After a long and brutal siege, Sulla's rough battle hardened legions, veterans of the Social War, took Athens on the Kalends of March 86 B.C. They looted and burned temples and structures built in the city by various Hellenistic kings to honor themselves and gain prestige. Months later, only after they ran out of water, Aristion surrendered the Akropolis. Athens was looted and punished severely. Roman vengeance ensured Greece would remain docile during later civil wars and Mithridatic wars.
GB69776. Bronze chalkous, SNG Cop 307, BMC Attica p. 81, 554; Kroll 97; Svoronos Athens pl. 84, 45 - 48, F, flan crack, weight 7.255 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Athens mint, Mithradates VI of Pontos & Aristion, 87 - 86 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Zeus advancing right, nude, hurling thunderbolt with right, left extended, A/Q-E flanking below arms, star between two crescents (one above and one below) in lower right field; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce; $70.00 (€52.50)

Carthage, Zeugitana, N. Africa, c. 350 - 320 B.C.
Click for a larger photo At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
GB59455. Bronze AE 18, Calciati III p. 381, 9 ff.; Alexandropoulos 20; SNG Cop 102 ff., F, flaked patina (stable), weight 6.288 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 135o, Sicilian(?) mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse palm tree; reverse head of horse right; scarce; $60.00 (€45.00)

Gallic Celts, Allobroges, Late 2nd - Early 1st Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo The Allobroges were a Gallic tribe of ancient Gaul, located between the Rhone River and the Lake of Geneva in what later became Savoy, Dauphiné, and Vivarais. Their cities were in the areas of modern-day Annecy, Chambéry and Grenoble, the modern departement of Isère, and modern Switzerland. Their capital was today's Vienne.
CE64467. Silver quinarius, CCCBM II 242, Castelin 43, de La Tour 5935, aVF, porous, rough, weight 1.905 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 180o, late 2nd - early 1st century B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, "striped costume"; reverse OMA, horseman galloping right, holding spear; $60.00 (€45.00)

Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.
Click for a larger photo In 257 A.D. the Franks invaded Gaul, reaching as far as Spain, where they destroyed Terraco (Tarragona). Also, the Alamanii invaded Italy, but Gallienus defeated them near Milan. In 258, Gallienus created a permanent mobile army from a number of cavalry vexillations to act as a standing reserve force.
RA64607. Silver antoninianus, Göbl MIR 874m, RIC V J49 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 1065 (Lugdunum), Elmer 42, SRCV III 10379 var (bust), aVF, toned, weight 3.977 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 135o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint, 257 - 258 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust left, spear over shoulder in right, shield in left; reverse VICT GERMANICA, Victory flying right, left foot on globe, extending wreath in right, trophy over shoulder in left, globe flanked by two mourning captives seated facing outward; $50.00 (€37.50)

Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 87 - 86 B.C., Mithradatic War Issue
Click for a larger photo In 87 B.C., Mithridates moved his forces into Greece and established Aristion as a tyrant in Athens. Sulla landed in Epirus and marched through Boeotia into Attica. Most cities declared their allegiance to Rome, foremost among them Thebes. Athens, however, remained loyal to Mithridates. After a long and brutal siege, Sulla's rough battle hardened legions, veterans of the Social War, took Athens on the Kalends of March 86 B.C. They looted and burned temples and structures built in the city by various Hellenistic kings to honor themselves and gain prestige. Months later, only after they ran out of water, Aristion surrendered the Akropolis. Athens was looted and punished severely. Roman vengeance ensured Greece would remain docile during later civil wars and Mithridatic wars.
GB68411. Bronze chalkous, SNG Cop 307, BMC Attica p. 81, 554; Kroll 97; Svoronos Athens pl. 84, 45 - 48, F, thick flan, weight 9.775 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 45o, Athens mint, Mithradates VI of Pontos & Aristion, 87 - 86 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Zeus advancing right, nude, hurling thunderbolt with right, left extended, A/Q-E flanking below arms, star between two crescents (one above and one below) in lower right field; $50.00 (€37.50)

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece. --
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


GB54589. Bronze AE 17, SNG Alpha Bank 1075, SNG Cop 1244, SGCV II -, VF, green patina, weight 3.304 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 225o, Macedonian mint, c. 211 - 197 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse B−A / Φ, Athena standing right, brandishing javelin in right, shield in left, thunderbolt lower right; scarce type; $45.00 (€33.75)

Judean Kingdom, Mattathias Antigonus (Mattatayah), 40 - 37 B.C.
Click for a larger photo
JD55121. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1164, F, weight 1.461 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, obverse retrograde Paleo-Hebrew inscription, Mattatayah, within wreath and border of dots; reverse double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, barley stalk between horns, border of dots; ex Amphora Coins (David Hendin); scarce; $45.00 (€33.75)

The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D., Irregular Issue
Click for a larger photo By 68, Jewish resistance in the north had been crushed. Vespasian made Caesarea Maritima his headquarters and methodically proceeded to clear the coast.
JD59019. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1360b, F, soft strike, weight 1.679 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, year 2, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse amphora with broad rim and two handles, year 2 (in Hebrew) around; reverse vine leaf on small branch, the freedom of Zion (in Hebrew) around; $45.00 (€33.75)

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB51106. Bronze AE 19, SNG München 1274 ff., SNG Cop 1275, SNG Alpha Bank 1142 cor., SNG Dreer -, gF, weight 5.789 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa across shoulder; reverse eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, B - A over Π−E flanking across field, star in exergue; $40.00 (€30.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo This rare type was imitated by Danubian Celts in the Serdi region of Moesia.
GB46696. Copper AE 20, SNG Cop 1299, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München, F, weight 8.666 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, obverse head of river-god, Strymon, right, with short horns and crown of reeds; reverse MAKE ∆ONΩN, ornamented trident, monograms below; scarce; $36.00 (€27.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Perseus of Macedonia (c. 212 BC - 166 BC) was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB60025. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG Cop 1276 ff., SNG München 1203 ff., SNG SNG Alpha Bank 1135 ff. (various monograms in ex), F, flat strike, weight 5.311 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 345o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 173 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right; reverse eagle standing slightly left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, B - A above wings flanking head, ΠEP monogram left; $32.00 (€24.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB60047. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG München 1203 ff., SNG Cop 1275 ff., SNG Alpha Bank 1135 ff. (various monograms in ex), aVF, weight 4.518 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right; reverse eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right B - A above wings flanking head, ΠEP monogram left, monogram(s) in ex; $32.00 (€24.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Perseus of Macedonia was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB60054. Bronze AE 19, SNG München 1223, SNG Alpha Bank 1140, SNG Cop 1276 ff. var (various monograms in ex), F, weight 6.089 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 235o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 179 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa across shoulder; reverse eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right B - A above wings flanking head, ΠEP monogram left; $32.00 (€24.00)

Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Perseus of Macedonia (c. 212 BC - 166 BC) was the last king of the Antigonid dynasty, who ruled the successor state in Macedonia created after the death of Alexander the Great. After losing the Battle of Pydna on 22 June 168 B.C., Macedonia came under Roman rule.

The hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus was the hero who killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB60027. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG Cop 1276 ff., SNG München 1203 ff., SNG SNG Alpha Bank 1135 ff. (various monograms in ex), F, weight 6.719 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 225o, Pella or Amphipolis mint, c. 173 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right; reverse eagle standing slightly left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, B - A above wings flanking head, ΠEP monogram left; $.99 (€.74)




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Enemies of Rome