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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Imperators| ▸ |Marc Antony||View Options:  |  |  |   

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Mark Antony was military commander for Julius Caesar during his conquest of Gaul and administrator of Italy while Caesar eliminated his opponents in Greece, Africa, and Spain. After Caesar's assassination in 44 B.C., Antony joined Lepidus and Caesar's adoptive son Octavian in a three-man dictatorship known as the Second Triumvirate. They defeated Caesar's murderers, the Liberatores, at the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C. and divided the Republic among themselves. Antony took the east, including Egypt, ruled by Queen Cleopatra, and command of Rome's war against Parthia. Relations within the Triumvirate were strained but civil war was averted when Antony married Octavian's sister Octavia. Despite the marriage, Antony continued his affair with Cleopatra and even married her. The Triumvirate broke up in 33 B.C. and erupted into civil war in 31 B.C. At Octavian's direction, the Roman Senate declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Octavian defeated Antony at the Battle of Actium the same year. Defeated, Antony and Cleopatra fled back to Egypt where they committed suicide. With Antony dead, Octavian was the undisputed master of the Roman world and would reign as the first Roman emperor with the title Augustus.

Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII & Alexander Helios, c. 38 B.C.

|Cleopatra| |VII|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Cleopatra| |VII| |&| |Alexander| |Helios,| |c.| |38| |B.C.||diobol|
Alexander Helios (b. 40 B.C., d. between 29 and 25 B.C.) was the son of Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. Helios (the Sun) had a twin sister, Cleopatra Selene (the Moon). He was made king of Armenia and king of king of Media and Parthia at about age six. After his mother's death, Egypt and his kingdoms were annexed by Rome; Alexander Helios was placed under the guardianship of Octavia and faded from history.
The exact denominations of this type and the other bronze units issued during Cleopatra's reign are unknown. Based on the bronze Egyptian denominations of Augustus used not long after this coin was struck, this coin was a diobol.
SH16527. Bronze diobol, SGCV II 7957, BMC Ptolemies 2-3, RPC I 3091, Vagi 76, aVF, among the finest known, weight 13.127 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, c. 38 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Cleopatra VII right, as Aphrodite, holding scepter and infant; reverse KΛEOΠATPAΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ, double cornucopia, joined at the bottom and bound with fillet, KYΠP monogram in lower right field; nice brown patina, among the finest known of this rare issue; rare; SOLD


|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Imperator,| |41| |B.C.||denarius|
Mark Antony was Julius Caesar's friend and military commander. After Caesar's assassination in 44 B.C., Antony joined Lepidus and Octavian in the Second Triumvirate, a three-man dictatorship. They defeated Caesar's assassins at the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C. and divided the Republic among themselves. Antony took the east, including Egypt, ruled by Queen Cleopatra. Relations within the Triumvirate were strained but civil war was averted when Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Despite the marriage, Antony continued an affair with Cleopatra and even married her. In 31 B.C., at Octavian's direction, the Roman Senate declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Octavian defeated Antony at the Battle of Actium the same year. Defeated, Antony and Cleopatra fled back to Egypt where they committed suicide. Octavian was then the undisputed master of the Roman world and would reign as the first Roman emperor with the title Augustus.
SH16771. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1475, RSC I 17a, Crawford 536/4, VF, weight 3.572 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, northern Syrian mint, late summer - autumn 38 B.C.; obverse ANT AVGVR III VIR R P C, bare head of Antony right; reverse IMP TER, trophy of captured arms, with shields and spears at base; banker's marks on obverse, mint luster in recesses; rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, Spring - Early Summer 41 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Second| |Triumvirate,| |Mark| |Antony| |and| |Octavian,| |Spring| |-| |Early| |Summer| |41| |B.C.||denarius|
The moneyer M. Barbatius was a friend of Julius Caesar. In 41 B.C. he was a quaestor pro praetore to Antony in the East.

In 41 B.C., Lucius Antonius, Mark Antony's younger brother, and Fulvia, Mark Antony's wife, anxious to get her husband back from Cleopatra, raised eight legions against Octavian. Lucius marched on Rome, drove out Lepidus, and promised the people that the triumvirate would be abolished. On the approach of Octavian, he retired to Perusia in Etruria, where he was besieged by three armies, and compelled to surrender in the winter of 41 B.C. The city was destroyed but Lucius was spared, and was sent by Octavian to Spain as governor. Nothing is known of the circumstances or date of his death.
SH57461. Silver denarius, Crawford 517/2, Sydenham 1181, BMCRR East 103, Sear CRI 243, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, SRCV I 1504, gVF, flat strike areas, weight 3.816 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, military mint moving with Antony, Ephesus(?) mint, spring - early summer 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV ligate), bare head of Antony right; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right; scarce; SOLD


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, 40 - 39 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Second| |Triumvirate,| |Mark| |Antony| |and| |Octavian,| |40| |-| |39| |B.C.||denarius|
In 40 B.C., with the Treaty of Brundisium, the Triumvirs agreed to divide the Roman Republic into spheres of influence. Gaius Octavian styled himself "Imperator Caesar" and controlled the Western provinces. Mark Antony controlled the Eastern provinces; the River Drin, the boundary between the provinces Illyricum and Macedonia, would serve as their frontier. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus controlled Hispania and Africa. The treaty was cemented by the marriage of Antony and Octavia, sister of Octavian.
SH65240. Silver denarius, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 1b; Crawford 528/2b; Sydenham 1193a; Sear CRI 261a; SRCV I -, VF, toned, area of weak strike on Antony, weight 3.740 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 90o, Italian mint, 40 - 39 B.C.; obverse M ANTON IMP III VIR R P C, bare head of Antony right, nothing below; reverse CAESAR IMP III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right with slight beard; ex Gemini auction X, lot 400; ex Randy Haviland Collection; ex CNG auction 72 (14 June 2006), lot 1345; ex Marc Poncin Collection; Spink auction 4013 (15 July 2004), lot 12; rare; SOLD


Marcus Antonius and Lucius Antonius, 41 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Marcus| |Antonius| |and| |Lucius| |Antonius,| |41| |B.C.||denarius|
Lucius Antonius was the younger brother and supporter of Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony). Together with his older brothers, Marcus and Gaius, Lucius spent his early years in bad company. Plutarch writes of the untamed life of the youths and their friends, frequenting gambling houses and drinking too much. In 44 B.C., the year of Julius Caesar's assassination, Lucius was a tribune of the plebs. In 41 B.C., he was consul with Publius Servilius Vatia. With Marcus Antonius' wife, Fulvia, he raised an eight legion army to fight against Octavian. Lucius and Fulvia ended besieged in Perusia in the winter of 41/40 BC, where they were forced to surrender by starvation. Octavian destroyed the city and Fulvia and Lucius were exiled. -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Antonius
SH08842. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1509, RSC I Antonia 48, Cocceia 2, BMCRR II East 107, VF, weight 3.84 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 45o, Ephesus mint, 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M NERVA PROQ P, bare head of Marcus Antonius right; reverse L ANTONIVS COS, bare head of Lucius Antonius, consul 41 B.C., right; SOLD


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Chalkis, Syria

|Cleopatra| |VII|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Cleopatra| |VII| |Thea| |Philopator,| |51| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |Chalkis,| |Syria||tetrachalkon|
Chalkis, Syria was one of the cities Cleopatra received from Marc Antony in 36 B.C.

Cleopatra VII Philopator was a Hellenistic ruler of Egypt, originally sharing power with her father Ptolemy XII and later with her brothers/husbands Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV; eventually gaining sole rule of Egypt. As Pharaoh, she consummated a liaison with Gaius Julius Caesar that solidified her grip on the throne. After Caesar's assassination, she aligned with Mark Antony. Her reign marks the end of the Hellenistic Era and the beginning of the Roman Era in the eastern Mediterranean. She was the last Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt.
SH26037. Bronze tetrachalkon, RPC I 4773, Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, VF/F, a little rough, weight 4.949 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis ad Libanon (Qinnasrin, Syria) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse BACIΛICCIC KΛE−OΠATPAC, diademed bust of Cleopatra VII right; reverse ETOYC KA TOY KAI v ΘEAC NEWTEPAC, Athena advancing left, holding spear and shield; good portrait for the type, green patina; very rare; SOLD


Marc Antony, Octavian and Lepidus, Triumvirs, 26 November 43 - 36 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Marc| |Antony,| |Octavian| |and| |Lepidus,| |Triumvirs,| |26| |November| |43| |-| |36| |B.C.||AE| |17|
RPC notes uncertainty regarding the reverse legend of this type. Apparently, none are fully and clearly legible. There is some question regarding the final Z. They note it may be Ξ. On our example however, it seems clearly to be Z.

The Second Triumvirate officially expired after two five-year terms in 33 B.C., but Octavian unilaterally expelled Lepidus in 36 B.C. While this effectively ended the three-man Triumvirate, Octavian and Mark Antony continued to serve as "triumvirs" despite their number.
SH60337. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2573, BMCRR 194 corr., VF, nice for the type, weight 3.400 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, 39 B.C.; obverse three jugate heads of the Triumvirs right; reverse APXIEPEYΣ ΓPAM ΓΛAYKΩN EΦE MAZAΣ, facing cult statue of Artemis with supports; attractive green patina, ex CNG; rare; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG III

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |LEG| |III||denarius|
This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion.
SH76381. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMCRR II East 193, RSC I 28, Sear CRI 350, Choice gVF, full circle centering on a broad flan, dark patina, areas of light corrosion, weight 3.586 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, fall 32 - spring 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - III, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Künker auction 111 (18 Mar 2006), lot 6511; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.||denarius|
In October 42 B.C. the Republican army was defeated by the legions Antony and Octavian at Philippi. Cassius and Brutus committed suicide. Brutus' body was brought to Antonius' camp, where he cast his purple paludamentum over his dead body and ordered an honorable funeral for his erstwhile comrade. The Republican cause was crushed; Rome rested in the hands of the Second Triumvirate.
SH87854. Silver denarius, Crawford 496/1, Sydenham 1168, BMCRR II Gaul 60, RSC I 12, Sear CRI 128, SRCV I 1467, VF, nice portrait, dark toning, obverse slightly off center, light marks and scratches, some porosity, tiny edge splits, weight 3.270 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, military mint with Antony in Greece, 42 B.C.; obverse M ANTONI IMP, bare head right; reverse III - VIR - R P C (counterclockwise from upper left), distyle temple, radiate facing head of Sol on medallion within; ex Savoca Coins, auction silver 25, lot 608; rare; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VIII

|Marc| |Antony|, |Mark| |Antony,| |Triumvir| |and| |Imperator,| |44| |-| |30| |B.C.,| |LEG| |VIII||denarius|
Caesar's old VIII Gallica was not disbanded and later became the VIII Augusta; however, that legion was associated with Octavian rather than Antony.
SH85063. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/21, Sydenham 1225, BMCRR II East 199, RSC I 35, EF, obverse off center, weight 3.830 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - VIII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 245, lot 1560; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

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