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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Greek Imperial ▸ PhoeniciaView Options:  |  |  | ◁◁      ▷▷

Roman Provincial Coins from Phoenicia

Jerusalem or Tyre, 18 B.C. - 69 A.D.

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The Jerusalem shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH22687. Silver shekel, Hendin 919, F, crude style, weight 13.469 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle l., right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, uncertain date & club l., KP over monogram r., Aramaic beth between legs; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 18 B.C. - 69 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The Jerusalem shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
JD33352. Silver half shekel, Hendin 920, SGICV 5209, aVF, weight 6.265 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY, eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, uncertain date & club left, KP and monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; barbaric style with blundered legends and date, typical of the later coins attributed by some experts to Jerusalem; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 11 - 12 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH22682. Silver half shekel, RPC -, RPC Supp. 4687E, F, weight 6.178 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 45o, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, ΠΛ (year 137) and club l., KP and monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; rare year; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 47 - 48 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH26438. Silver half shekel, Hendin 920, SGICV 5209 var, aVF, weight 6.488 g, maximum diameter 19.00 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 47 - 48 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, uncertain date and club l., KP and EPH monogram r., Aramaic beth between legs; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 42 - 43 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH26225. Silver half shekel, BMC Phoenicia -, RPC I 4700 (1 specimen cited), aVF, dark toning, weight 5.353 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 42 - 43 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞH (year 168 = 42 - 43 A.D.) and club l., KP and monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; rare year; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 36 - 37 A.D.

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JD35412. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4695, Prieur 1465, Hendin 920, SGICV 5209, F, weight 6.493 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY, eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞB (year 162) left, KP and monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 126 B.C. - 65 A.D., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.


The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
JD41483. Silver shekel, RPC I 4627, BMC p. 246 -, F/aVF, tight flan, weight 13.245 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 45o, Tyre mint, 39 - 38 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOYIEPAΣ KAIAΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond under wing, date ΠH (year 88) over club left, monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; rare year; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 42 - 43 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH22678. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4700 (1 specimen cited), BMC Phoenicia -, gF, weight 6.364 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞH (year 168 = 42 - 43 A.D.) and club l., KP and monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; very rare year; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 99 - 98 B.C., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.


The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH28068. Silver shekel, Prieur 1374; BMC Phoenicia, p. 246, 176 var (right monogram), VF, weight 12.897 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, 38 - 37 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOYIEPAΣ KAIAΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle l., right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, date ΠΘ (year 99) over club and palm frond left, YB monogram right, Aramaic beth or peh between legs; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 41 - 42 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD40446. Silver half shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 253, 241; RPC I 4699; Prieur 1469, VF, corrosion, dark toning, weight 5.940 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞZ (year 167) over club left, KP over Φ right, Aramaic aleph between legs; SOLD


Arados, Phoenicia, 72 - 71 B.C.

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"The dated coins of this series span almost a century, from 137 to 45 B.C." - Greek Coins and Their Values by David Sear. Dates are written in Greek letters in the left field. Below the date is usually a Phoenician letter and below that usually two Greek letters. These control letters may indicate magistrates.
SH66273. Silver tetradrachm, Duyrat 3751; BMC Phoenicia, p 32, 263; Cohen DCA 772, VF, weight 15.263 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Arados mint, 72 - 71 B.C.; obverse turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche right; reverse APA∆IΩN (downward on right), Nike standing left holing apluster in right and palm in left, HΠP (year 188) above Phoenician letter aleph above MΣ in left field, all within laurel wreath; SOLD


"Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver,"

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SH11419. Silver shekel, Prieur 1369, RPC 4623, F, weight 12.465 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOYIEPAΣ KAIAΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle l., right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, Π∆ (year 84) and club l., BN r., Phoenician beth between legs; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 43 - 44 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The Jerusalem shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH28745. Silver half shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 253, 242, aVF, weight 6.257 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞΘ (year 169) and club l., KP and BXE monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 18 B.C. - 69 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The Jerusalem shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH22823. Silver half shekel, Hendin 920, SGICV 5209 var, aVF, weight 6.517 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY, eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, uncertain date & club l., KP and monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; barbaric style with blundered legends and date, typical of the later coins attributed by some experts to Jerusalem; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 42 - 43 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
JD33347. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4700 (1 specimen cited), BMC Phoenicia -, VF, weight 6.269 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞH (year 168 = 42 - 43 A.D.) and club left, KP and monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; very rare year; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 36 - 37 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD40408. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4695, Prieur 1465, BMC Phoenicia -, aVF, toned, weight 6.243 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞB (year 162) over club left, KP over monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 38 - 39 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD40415. Silver half shekel, BMC Phoenicia p. 252, 236 var (BA monogram, aleph between legs); Prieur 1466; RPC I 4696, aVF, weight 6.164 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 38 - 39 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞ∆ (year 164) over club left, KP over B∆Γ? monogram right, Aramaic beth between legs; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 14 - 15 A.D.

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At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD40416. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4688, Prieur 1458, VF, dark toning, weight 5.483 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 14 - 15 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PM (year 140) over club left, KP over monogram right, aramaic letter between legs; struck with a crude and worn reverse die; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 45 - 46 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD40426. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4702, Prieur 1472, BMC Phoenicia -, VF, weight 5.931 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 45 - 46 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, POA (year 171) over club left, KP over monogram right, Aramaic aleph between legs; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 35 - 36 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were the only coins accepted by the temple. Some experts believe that after the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. These coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The "Jerusalem" shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.

JD40438. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4694, Prieur 1464, BMC Phoenicia -, aVF, some marks, rough, weight 6.270 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 35 - 36 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΞA (year 161) over club left, KP over ΞΣ right, Aramaic aleph between legs; SOLD


"Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver,"

Click for a larger photo
Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.


The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH09023. Silver shekel, Prieur 1375, RPC I 4629, aVF, weight 13.58 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 45o, Tyre mint, obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOYIEPAΣ KAIAΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle l., right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, koppa B (year 92) and club l., monogram r., Phoenician beth between legs; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 44 - 45 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH26230. Silver half shekel, RPC Supp. 4701A (1 specimen), BMC Phoenicia -, RPC I -, aVF, weight 6.352 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 44 - 45 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PO (year 170) and club l., KP and monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; rare year; SOLD


The Temple Tax Coin, Tyre KP Type Half Shekel, Jerusalem or Tyre Mint, 56 - 57 A.D.

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
JD33350. Silver half shekel, RPC I 4704, Prieur 1474, BMC Phoenicia -, F, weight 5.913 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 56 - 57 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PΠB (year 182) and club left, KP and monogram right, Aramaic letter between legs; rare year; SOLD


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., Arados, Phoenica

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In June 36 B.C., Mark Antony launched a major offensive against the Parthians with about 100,000 Roman and allied troops, including 10 legions and 10,000 cavalry. The campaign was a disaster. He was defeated, abandoned by his allies, and lost more than a quarter of his men, many to disease and starvation during his winter retreat to Egypt. Meanwhile, Octavian had forced Lepidus resign and had swayed the traditional Republican aristocracy against Antony. Antony was condemned as a man of low morals who had ?gone native? and abandoned his faithful wife and children in Rome to be with the promiscuous queen of Egypt. Several times Antony was summoned to Rome, but he remained in Alexandria with Cleopatra. The Triumvirate was no more. In Rome, Octavian ruled alone.
RP71397. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 4467; Baramki AUB 192, pl. XV, 10, F, green patina, weight 7.498 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Aradus mint, 36 - 35 B.C.; obverse bare head right; reverse bull leaping left, CK∆ (year 224 of Arados) above, MH (48 nummi?) below; extremely rare; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 44 - 45 A.D.

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH26210. Silver half shekel, RPC Supp. 4701A (1 specimen), BMC Phoenicia -, RPC I -, aVF, weight 6.567 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 44 - 45 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, PO (year 170) and club l., KP and monogram r., Aramaic letter between legs; toned; rare year; SOLD


Jerusalem or Tyre, 47 - 48 A.D.

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple
After the coinage of Tyre was debased under Roman control, some experts believe Herod the Great began to strike "Tyre" shekels in Jerusalem. Other experts believe all of the type were struck at Tyre. These later coins were of cruder fabric and style, but maintained the silver purity required to pay the temple tax. The late shekels have the letters KP or KAP to the right of the eagle and dates range from PH (18/17 B.C.) to PKE (69/70 A.D.). The Greek letters KP or KAP are probably an abbreviation for KAICAP, Greek for Caesar.
SH26213. Silver half shekel, BMC Phoenicia -, RPC I -, RPC Supplement 4672A, VF, dark toning, weight 6.537 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre or Jerusalem mint, 47 - 48 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, POΓ (year 173) and club l., KP and monogram r., Phoenician aleph between legs; struck with a damaged reverse die; rare year; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Sidon, Phoenicia

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Under Elagabalus, Sidon was made a Roman colonia named Colonia Aurelia Pia Sidon.
RP66230. Bronze AE 27, cf. SNG Cop 256; Rouvier V p. 262, 1494; BMC Phoenicia p. 184, 244; Lindgren III 1446 (all with variations), VF, weight 13.583 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon mint, obverse IMP C M AV ANTONINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL AVR PIA METRO. SID in exergue, cart of Astarte with two wheels and four columns supporting roof, Baetyl (probably a meteorite) placed on a base within, four palm fronds projecting from roof; ex Seaver Collection; rare; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Akko-Ptolemais, Phoenicia

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Ptolemais was a maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7). It was originally Accho, but was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter.
SH60148. Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 1222, SNG Cop -, gVF, weight 13.842 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 330o, Akko-Ptolemais mint, 215 - 217 A.D.; obverse AYT K M A ANTΩNEINOC CEB, laureate head right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATOC TO ∆, facing eagle, head left, holding wreath in beak, wings spread, stars above caps of Dioscuri between legs; minor encrustations, attractive style; SOLD


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., Byblos, Phoenicia

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Astarte, a Phoenician fertility and war goddess, was the principal deity of the port city of Sidon. Other major centers of Astarte's worship were Tyre and Byblos, and she was worshipped as far west as Carthage, Sicily, Sardinia and Cyprus. The Greeks associated her with Aphrodite. Byblos produced papyrus and our word bible was derived from the name of this city.
RP06541. Bronze AE 24, BMC Phoenicia 40 - 43, Rouvier 699, gVF, weight 8.21 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Byblos mint, as caesar, 11 Apr 217 - mid May 218 A.D.; obverse [MOΠ] ∆IA∆YMENIANOC KAI, bare-headed, cuirassed bust right; reverse BYBΛOYIEPAC, temple of two columns surmounted by arch of shell pattern, containing Astarte standing right, foot on prow, crowned by Nike standing on column; partially uncleaned, fantastic portrait; scarce; SOLD


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Phoenicia, Berytos

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Astarte, called "Ashtroth" in Scripture, was the favorite goddess of the Sidonians, Tyrians, Philistines, and Syro-Phoenicians generally. She was associated with the Greek Aphrodite and Roman Venus Genetrix, being believed by the ancients to be the goddess of generation, as well as of beauty. Astarte was chiefly worshipped and appears on the coins of Berytus, Bostra, Sidon, and Tyre. Her image is of a young woman, wearing a tall head dress; and clothed in a tunic, high in the neck- sometimes, not reaching lower than the knees, or sometimes with a longer dress, but with one knee exposed, and one foot planted on a galley's prow.
SH11625. Bronze AE 28, BMC Phoenicia 264, VF, weight 15.583 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Berytos mint, 259 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG FEL BER, Astarte standing facing, foot on galley, cruciform standard in right and aphlaston in left arm, crowned by Nike standing on column right; nice green patina; SOLD




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REFERENCES

Baramki, D.C. The Coin Collection of the American University of Beirut Museum. (Beirut, 1974).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Duyrat, F. Arados Hellénistique: Étude historique et monétaire. (Beirut, 2005).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins. (Amphora, 2010).
Hill, G.F. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum: Phoenicia. (London, 1910).
Hoover, Oliver D. Handbook of Coins of the Southern Levant: Phoenicia, Southern Koile Syria (Including Judaea), and Arabia, Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 10. (Lancaster, PA, 2010).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Meshorer, Y. "The Coins of Dora" in INJ 9 (1986).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Rouvier, J. "Numismatique des Villes de la Phénicie" in Journal International d’Archéologie Numismatique. (Athens, 1900-1904).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (New Jersey, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus-Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 07, 2015.
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Roman Phoenicia