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Home>Catalog>GreekCoins>Geographic-AllPeriods>Anatolia>Pisidia PAGE 1/3123»»»

Pisidia

Pisidia included the mountainous country between Phrygia and the north of Pamphylia and north-east of Lycia. Uncivilized in early times, only Selge struck money before the time of Alexander the Great. Alexander the Great conquered Sagalassos on his way to Persia, but Termessos defied him. After Alexander died, the region was ruled by Antigonus Monophthalmus, and possibly Lysimachus of Thrace, after which Seleucus I took control. The Selucids founded colonies at strategically important places and the local people were Hellenised, but the area was contested by the Attalids of Pergamon and invading Galatian Celts. Through the Treaty of Apamea, Pisidia officially passed to the Attalids in 188 BC. Attalos III, the last king of Pergamon, bequeathed his kingdom to Rome in 133 B.C. Rome gave Pisidia to the Kingdom of Cappadocia, but the Pisidians allied with pirate-dominated Cilicia and Pamphylia. Roman rule was restored in 102 B.C. In 39 B.C. Mark Antony bestowed Pisidia upon Amyntas, king of Galatia, who held it until his death in 25 B.C. Pisidia was then made part of the new province of Galatia. In 6 B.C., Augustus founded a line of colonies, Antiocheia, Olbasa, Cremna, and Comama.


Komama, Pisidia, 1st Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo It appears almost all known examples of this rare type were found in a single hoard.
SH64061. Bronze AE 15, Von Aulock Komama 4; SNG BnF 1439, Choice EF, weight 3.169 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Komama mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse lion left, KO in exergue; nice green patina; rare; $225.00 (€168.75)

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 6: Burdur Museum, Vol. 1: Pisidia, Part 1: Adada-Prostanna
Click for a larger photo  
BK65507. Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 6: Burdur Museum, Vol. 1: Pisidia, Part 1: Adada - Prostanna, by Huseyin Koker, 2011, 93 pages, 42 plate, NEW; $110.00 (€82.50)

Selge, Pisidia, c. 350 - 300 B.C.
Click for a larger photo Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprüçay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D. Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths.
GS68737. Silver obol, SNGvA 5266 ff.; SNG BnF 1930; SNG Kayhan 1061; BMC Lycia p. 257, 7; cf. SNG Cop 246 ff. (no tongue); SGCV II 5478, VF, toned, edge chip, weight 0.768 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 45o, Selge mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse Gorgoneion head facing with protruding tongue; reverse helmeted head of Athena right, astragalos behind; $110.00 (€82.50)

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia
Click for a larger photo Gordian III was grandson of Gordian I and nephew of Gordian II. Made Caesar before the murders of Balbinus and Pupienus, he succeeded them. Little is known of his reign. He attacked Persia, gaining Mesopotamia. He died shortly after, through illness or plot of his Praetorian prefect and successor, Philip I.
RP57184. Bronze AE 28, Krzyzanowska p. 176 and pl. XXXI (II / 8 ), SNG Cop 73, SNG BnF 1249, BMC Pisidia -, SNGvA -, VF, weight 10.395 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 180o, Pisidia, Antiocheia mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AV, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right., from behind; reverse CAES ANTIOCH CL, emperor standing right, spear transverse in right, globe extended in left, S - R across field; $90.00 (€67.50)

Termessos Minor, Pisidia, 1st Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
GB53296. Bronze AE 12, BMC Pisidia p. 276, 1, Fine, green patina, weight 0.957 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse bust of Hermes right, wearing petasos; caduceus behind; reverse TEPMHΣ−ΣEΩN, Eagle standing right on caduceus; rare; $80.00 (€60.00)

Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia
Click for a larger photo Paul of Tarsus gave his first sermon to the Gentiles (Acts 13:13?52) at Antiochia in Pisidia, and visited the city once on each of his missionary journeys, helping to make Antioch a center of early Christianity in Anatolia. Antioch in Pisidia is also known as Antiochia Caesareia and Antiochia in Phrygia.
RP69834. Bronze AE 24, Kryzanowska Av IX / Rv 22, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Pfalzer -, BMC Lycia -, VF, rough, weight 8.175 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 45o, Pisidia, Antioch mint, 260 - 268 A,D,; obverse IMP C P AEI LIC CVLIENO (sic), radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANTICHI OCL (sic), female figure (Genius of colony) standing left, kalathos on head, laurel branch in right hand, cornucopia in left, Γ left, S R in exergue; from The Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; scarce; $75.00 (€56.25)

Antiocheia, Pisidia, 2nd Century A.D.
Click for a larger photo Paul of Tarsus gave his first sermon to the Gentiles (Acts 13:13?52) at Antiochia in Pisidia, and visited the city once on each of his missionary journeys, helping to make Antioch a center of early Christianity in Anatolia. Antioch in Pisidia is also known as Antiochia Caesareia and Antiochia in Phrygia.
RP54612. Bronze AE 15, BMC Lycia etc. p. 176, 2 var; SNG BnF1070 var; SNGvA 8559 var; SNG Cop 19 var (legend variations and none with simpulum), VF, weight 1.858 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 180o, Pisidia, Antiocheia mint, 2nd century A.D.; obverse ANTIOCH, draped bust of Hermes right, caduceus at shoulder; reverse COLONIAE, garlanded lit altar, simpulum below; scarce variant; $70.00 (€52.50)

Selge, Pisidia, 3rd Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprüçay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D. Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths.
GS68407. Silver trihemiobol, SGCV II 5478, SNG Cop 246, SNGvA 5278, BMC Pisidia p. 259, 23 ff., aVF, weight 0.846 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 180o, Selge mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse facing Gorgoneion; reverse head of Athena right in crested helmet, astragalos behind; $60.00 (€45.00)

Selge, Pisidia, 3rd Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprüçay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D. Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths.
GS65760. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 246; SNGvA 5278; BMC Pisidia p. 259, 23 ff.; SGCV II 5478, VF, weight 0.876 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, die axis 180o, Selge mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse facing Gorgoneion with long hair, resembling Apollo or Helios; reverse head of Athena right in crested helmet, astragalos behind; $50.00 (€37.50)

Selge, Pisidia, 3rd Century B.C.
Click for a larger photo Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Köprüçay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D. Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths.
GS65781. Silver trihemiobol, SNG Cop 246; SNGvA 5278; BMC Pisidia p. 259, 23 ff.; SGCV II 5478, VF, reverse off center, weight 0.585 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 135o, Selge mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse facing Gorgoneion with long hair, resembling Apollo or Helios; reverse head of Athena right in crested helmet, astragalos behind; $50.00 (€37.50)



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REFERENCES

Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des médailles. RN. (1897-1898).
Babelon, J. Catalogue de la collection de Luynes: monnaies greques. (Paris, 1924-1936).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 2. (London, 1929).
Hill, G.F. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Lycia, Pamphylia, and Pisidia. (London, 1897).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Kryzanowska, A. Monnaies Coloniales de Antioche de Pisidie. (Warsaw, 1970).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland: Pfälzer Privatsammlungen. Part 5: Pisidien und Lykaonien. (Munich, 1999).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock. Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia... (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale. Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
von Aulock, H. “Kleinasiatische Münzstätten, VI: Die römische Kolonie Komama in Pisidien” in JNG XX (1970).
von Aulock, H. Münzen und Städte Pisidiens. (Tübingen, 1977).

Catalog current as of Friday, July 25, 2014.
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Pisidia Coins