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Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Darius I the Great, Sep 522 - Oct 486 B.C.

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Darius I the Great was the third king of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. He ruled at its peak, when it included much of West Asia, the Caucasus, part of the Balkans (Thrace-Macedonia and Paeonia), most of the Black Sea coast, parts of the North Caucasus, Central Asia as far as the Indus Valley, Egypt, eastern Libya and coastal Sudan. Darius organized the empire by dividing it into provinces and placing satraps to govern them. He made Aramaic the official language of the empire, established standard weights and measures, and built roads and construction projects throughout the empire. His invasion of Greece ended when he was defeated at Marathon by a smaller Greek army. He was a supporter of the Jews, mentioned in the Biblical books of Ezra, Nehemiah, Daniel, Haggai, and Zechariah.Persian Empire

GA77387. Silver 1/6 siglos, Carradice type II; Winzer 1.8, this denomination is otherwise unpublished in refs; cf. Klein 756 (1/4 siglos); SNG Kayhan 1027 (1/3 siglos), F, grainy and porous, weight 0.804 g, maximum diameter 8.26 mm, probably Sardis (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 510 - Oct 486 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, drawing bow, bearded, crowned, quiver at shoulder; reverse rectangular incuse; extremely rare; $140.00 (124.60)


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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Unpublished in the standard references but several known from auction listings.
SH77380. Electrum hemihekte, Lydo-Milesian standard; cf. CNG auction (9 Mar 2016), lot 156 (same dies); Elektron I 9 corr.; Weidauer -; Trait I -; SNG Kayhan -, VF, light marks, weight 1.189 g, maximum diameter 7.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 BC; obverse crude scarab beetle(?); reverse irregular six-lobed incuse pattern; very rare; $1080.00 (961.20)


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Paphos(?), Cyprus

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Titus visited the Sanctuary of Aphrodite at Paphos in 69 A.D., when the future emperor was on his way to Egypt. He consulted the oracle of Aphrodite, and was told that he had a great future.

The 1.2 mm high gray-green conical stone, which once stood at the center of the Sanctuary of Aphrodite at Paphos, was found by archaeologists near the temple and is now in the Cyprus Museum in Nicosia. It is not a meteorite.
RP59007. Silver didrachm, RPC II 1809, F, encrustations, weight 5.636 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos(?) mint, obverse AYTOKPATΩP TITOC KAICAP, laureate head left; reverse ETOYC NEOY IEPOY, temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, conical stone (xoanon) at center, Θ in exergue; rare; $320.00 (284.80)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

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RIC lists this type as common but we have never handled an example and did not find even a single example online. There is a coin listed as the type on Coin Archives but it is misattributed and actually RIC 162 (star above wreath reverse upper right). We believe it is rare.
RL70692. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Aquileia 161, Bastien 334, LRBC II 904, SRCV V 18802, aVF, rough, weight 4.245 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 18 Jan 350 - spring 351 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Magnentius riding right, spearing enemy, shield and broken spear on the ground below horse, wreath above star upper right, AQS between two palm fronds in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; $60.00 (53.40)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The reverse legend translates, "Happy Times Restored." Happy times would not last for Constans. This coinage was among his last issues before his general Magnentius rebelled and had him killed.
RL90437. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 244, LRBC II 1136, Voetter 31, SRCV V 18730, Cohen VII 10, Choice gVF, light encrustations, weight 4.945 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 45o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 348 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left in Galley left, labarum in left hand, Phoenix on globe in right hand, Victory steering at stern, AQS in exergue; $200.00 (178.00)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The reverse legend translates, "Happy Times Restored." Happy times would not last for Constans. This coinage was among his last issues before his general Magnentius rebelled and had him killed.
RL90440. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 252, LRBC II 1151, Voetter 47, SRCV V 18673, Cohen VII 13, Choice VF, weight 4.795 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 225o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 349 - 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), Constans standing left in galley left, Victory with wreath and palm on globe in right hand, labarum in left hand, Victory seated in stern steering, A left, ESIS in exergue; $190.00 (169.10)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 187 - 167 B.C.

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In 168 B.C., the Romans invaded Macedonia and overthrew King Perseus in the First Battle of Pydna. In 149 B.C., Andriskos, at that time ruler of Adramyttium only, claiming to be Perseus' son, announced his intention to retake Macedonia from Rome. Andriskos traveled to Syria to request military help from Demetrius Soter of Syria. Demetrius instead handed him over Rome. Andriskos escaped captivity, raised a Thracian army, invaded Macedonia, and defeated the Roman praetor Publius Juventius. Andriskos then declared himself King Philip VI of Macedonia. In 148 B.C., Andriskos conquered Thessaly and made an alliance with Carthage, thus bringing the Roman wrath on him. In 148 B.C., in what the Romans called the Fourth Macedonian War, he was defeated by the Roman praetor Q. Caecilius Metellus at the Second Battle of Pydna. He fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome. Andriskos' brief reign over Macedonia was marked by cruelty and extortion. After this Macedonia was formally reduced to a Roman province.
BB62452. Bronze AE 19, SNG ANS 118 - 119, SNG Cop -, BMC Macedonia -, F, pitting, weight 7.106 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 187 - 167 B.C.; obverse Laureate head of Zeus right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, two goats on their hind legs, contending head to head; green patina; rare; $45.00 (40.05)


Kierion, Thessaly, Early - Mid 4th Century B.C.

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Kierion was originally named Arne for the Nymph on the reverse of this coin. Most references, including BCD, identify the male god on the obverse as Zeus. Rogers and SNG Cop say Poseidon. Since, according to one myth, Arne became pregnant by Poseidon and bore the twins Aiolos and Boiotos, we think Poseidon is more likely.
BB62454. Bronze chalkous, cf. BCD Thessaly II 105.1; Rogers 173; SNG Cop 35; BMC Thessaly p. 15, 1; SNG Evelpidis 1516, Fair, weight 2.492 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 255o, Kierion mint, early - Middle 4th century B.C.; obverse head of Poseidon (or Zeus) right with a short neatly trimmed beard and fillet binding his hair; reverse KIEPIEIΩN, the nymph Arne kneeling right on right knee, looking left, her torso bare, leaning on right hand on the ground, tossing astragaloi with left; scarce; $50.00 (44.50)


Orchomenos, Arcadia, Greece, 370 - 340 A.D.

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Kallisto, the daughter of King Lykaon of Arcadia, was seduced and impregnated by Zeus. Caught in the act, jealous Hera angrily transformed her into a bear and persuaded Artemis to shoot her. Zeus had Hermes recover the child Arkas from her womb and transformed Kallisto into the constellation Ursa Major. Arkas grew up to become the eponymous founder and king of the Arkadians. Upon his death, he was placed in the heavens beside his mother as Ursa Minor.

In another version of the myth, Kallisto, as a companion of Artemis, vowed to remain a virgin, but was seduced and impregnated by Zeus. Artemis seeing her condition in the bath, in anger, changed her into a bear. When her son Arkas was grown, Kallisto wandered into the sanctuary of Zeus Lykaios. Arkas, not recognizing his mother, would have killed her, but Zeus immediately transformed the pair into Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.
GB62604. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Peloponnesos 1575, SNG Cop 265, VF, weight 5.317 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 270o, Orchomenos mint, 370 - 340 A.D.; obverse EPXOMEN−IΩN APKAΣ, Artemis kneeling right, holding bow, hound seated right behind her; reverse Kallisto seated left, falling backwards with arms outstretched, an arrow piercing her breast, the infant Arkas below her lying on his back reaching upward toward Kallisto; very rare; $110.00 (97.90)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH71597. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Mnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, Dewing 1611, SGCV I 2526, VF, no test cuts, nice Athena and owl, toned, well centered on a tight flan, as usual crest off flan, light marks and scratches, weight 17.042 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 135o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C. (probably close to 404 B.C.); obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; $1000.00 (890.00)




  







Catalog current as of Friday, May 27, 2016.
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