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Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales

RB66470. Copper quadrans, RIC II, part 1, 1015 (R); Cohen I 348; BMCRE II 740; SRCV I -, aF, weight 2.685 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMP VESPASIAN AVG, rudder on globe; reverse P M TR P P P COS VIII, winged caduceus, S - C flanking across lower half of field; rare; $55.00 (€48.95)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In 77 or 78 A.D., Gnaeus Julius Agricola was made governor of Roman Britain, a post he occupied until 84. In his first year, Agricola subdued the Ordovices in Wales and pursued the remnants of the tribe to Anglesey, the holy island of the Druids. According to Tacitus, he exterminated the whole tribe. The Ordovices do completely disappear from the historical record, but considering the mountainous terrain, it is unlikely killed the entire population. Another tribe, the Silures, was either also militarily defeated or simply agreed to terms. Tacitus wrote of the Silures: non atrocitate, non clementia mutabatur - the tribe "was changed neither by cruelty nor by clemency." A Roman squadron, sent by Agricola, explored the north of Scotland for the first time, discovering the Orkney and Shetland Islands.Pre-Roman Wales

RB67841. Copper quadrans, RIC II, part 1, 826 (R2); Cohen I 347; SRCV I -, F, weight 2.861 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 75 A.D.; obverse IMP VESPASIAN AVG, rudder on globe; reverse P M TR P P P COS VIII S C, winged caduceus; rare; $34.00 (€30.26)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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This type may commemorate a victory on the Sea of Galilee during the recapture of Judaea.
RB68879. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 335; BMCRE II 617; Cohen I 632; Hunter I 119 var. (S - C, low across field); SRCV I -, F, well centered, nice green patina, small areas of corrosion on obv, weight 12.620 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head right; reverse VICTORIA NAVALIS, Victory standing right on a prow, wreath in right, palm frond over should in left, S C in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $180.00 (€160.20)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Perge, Pamphylia

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The monumental fountain or nymphaeum of Perga consists of a wide pool, and behind it a two-storeyed richly worked facade. From its inscription, it is apparent that the structure was dedicated to Artemis Pergaia, Septimius Severus, his wife Julia Domna, and their sons. An inscription belonging to the facade, various facade fragments, and marble statues of Septimius Severus and his wife, all found in excavations of the nymphaeum, are now in the Antalya Museum. Nymphaeum of Perge

RP69817. Bronze AE 18, SNG Cop 323 var. (CEB), Lindgren A1108A var. (same), SNG PfPS 317 var. (same), SNG BnF -, BMC Lycia -, SGICV -, Nice aVF, weight 4.618 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Perga mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆OMNA CE, draped bust right; reverse ΠEPΓAMΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing long chiton, hair in bun, arrow downward at side in right, bow in left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $75.00 (€66.75)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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After a successful campaign in Judaea Vespasian was declared emperor by his troops at Alexandria. Upon the defeat of Vitellius he went to Rome and consolidated his power. Vespasian was popular, down to earth and witty. Responsible for an economic and military recovery of Rome, he was one of the greatest Roman emperors.
RS70161. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 41 (C2); BMCRE II 61; RSC II 566; BnF III 46; SRCV I 2313, F, nice portrait, toned, small edge cracks, weight 3.250 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Jun 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TRI POT II COS III P P, Pax seated left, olive-branch in right hand, caduceus in left; $80.00 (€71.20)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, and raising a fold of her dress with her left hand. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men.
RB73623. Copper as, RIC II, part 1, 894; BMCRE II 725, BnF III 757, Cohen I 457, Hunter I C3852, SRCV I -, F, centered, dark green patina, cleaning scratches, light corrosion and encrustations, weight 9.599 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 76 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII, laureate head right; reverse Spes standing left, flower in right, raising skirt with left, S - C flanking at sides; $70.00 (€62.30)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RB73893. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II, part 1, 715; BMCRE II 696; BnF III 712; Cohen I 152; Hunter I 130; SRCV I 2346 var. (radiate head left), aVF, well centered, green patina, cleaning scratches, weight 12.579 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 74 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS V CENS, radiate head right; reverse FELICITAS PVBLICA, Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across field; $90.00 (€80.10)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." This coin was struck to ask Fortuna to ensure Vespasian returned safely to Roma from the war in Judaea. The portrait resembles Vitellius because the mint had not yet received a Vespasian portrait and the die engraver modified Vitellius' portrait based on a verbal description.
RS77279. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 19; RSC II 84; BMCRE II 7; BnF III 7; Cohen I 84 (2f.); SRCV I -, F, toned, damaged area on top of obverse and bottom of reverse, weight 2.622 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. Jan - Jun 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head (resembling Vitellius) right; reverse COS ITER FORT RED, Fortuna standing left, resting right hand on prow at feet on left, cornucopia in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€89.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In 76 A.D., Governor of Britannia Sextus Julius Frontinus subdued the Silures and other hostile tribes of Wales, established a fortress at Caerleon or Isca Augusta for Legio II Augusta and made a network of smaller forts for his auxiliary forces.
RS77330. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 847; BMCRE II 180; BnF III 156; RSC II 121; Hunter I 57; SRCV I 2287, F, well centered, toned, light marks and porosity, weight 3.227 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 76 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS VII, eagle standing facing on low garlanded cippus, head left, wings open but not spread; $100.00 (€89.00)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Cybele was born a hermaphrodite, but castrated by the gods, she became female. Heeding the Sibylline oracle, the senate brought her worship to Rome in 204 B.C. as the first officially sanctioned Eastern cult. After approval they were dismayed to learn that the priesthood required voluntary self-castration, which was abhorrent to the Romans. Romans were barred from entering the priesthood or even entering the priest's sanctuary. The eunuch priests, recruited from outside Rome, were confined to their sanctuary, leaving only to parade in the streets during festivals in April. Claudius removed the bans on Roman participation, making worship of Cybele and her consort Attis part of the state religion.
RS77360. Silver denarius, RIC IV S564; RSC III 123; BMCRE V p. 163, S51; Hunter III p. 42, S11; SRCV II 6593, VF/aVF, nice portrait, grainy, porosity, flan cracks, weight 2.466 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 205 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse MATER DEVM, Cybele seated left between two lions, wearing towered crown, branch in right hand, scepter in left hand, resting left arm on drum; scarce; $65.00 (€57.85)




  







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