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Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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The referenced coins are not very similar. It might be more appropriate to describe this coin as unpublished but perhaps the pattern is purely random and it is from the same mint and issue as the Kayhan or Von Aulock coin.
SH76827. Electrum 1/24 stater, cf. SNG Kayhan 688, SNGvA 7768, (neither very similar), Weidauer -, Rosen -, Traité I -, Mitchiner ATEC -, Zhuyuetang -, VF, weight 0.710 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse random(?) pattern of shapes and pellets; reverse a roughly square incuse punch with a central pellet surrounded by a random(?) pattern of curved lines; $640.00 (€569.60)


Ionia, c. 625 - 600 B.C.

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SH77549. Electrum 1/24 stater, Elektron I 51, cf. Rosen 269 (hemihekte) and 309 (1/96th stater), Weidauer-, Traité -, SNG Kayhan -, VF, well centered, bumps and marks, earthen deposits, weight 0.537 g, maximum diameter 5.5 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 625 - 600 B.C.; obverse raised square; reverse incuse square punch; $540.00 (€480.60)


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Rough Irregular "Typeless" Type

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Some sales catalogs describe similar coins as the striated type. The roughly parallel lines on the striated type appear to be impressed into the "obverse" by lines cut into the anvil. On this coin, it appears the rough irregular "typeless" surface is simply flattened rough pre-strike features from the raw irregular nugget-like "planchet." Based on the apparent wear on the reverse punch, huge numbers of this type may have been struck. Very few have survived. This is the first example handled by Forum.
SH77378. Electrum 1/24 stater, cf. SNGvA 7768, SNG Kayhan 682, Traité I 14 -15, Weidauer -, Rosen -, VF, weight 0.647 g, maximum diameter 5.7 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse flattened rough irregular "typeless" surface; reverse roughly square incuse pyramidal punch with striated sides, divided roughly in half by a raised irregular line, striated sides and the irregular line appear to be the result of wear; very rare; $1350.00 (€1201.50)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, and raising a fold of her dress with her left hand. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men.
RS77391. Silver denarius, RIC II 181d, RSC II 390, BMCRE III 417, Hunter II 143, Strack II 177, SRCV II 3479, VF, well centered on broad flan, light toning, struck with a cracked obverse die, edge splits, weight 2.961 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Spes standing left, raising flower in right hand, lifting fold of drapery with left; $155.00 (€137.95)


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D.

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Diadumenian was the son of Macrinus, made Caesar at the age of nine in 217 A.D. and Augustus in 218. After his father's defeat he fled towards Parthia but was overtaken and executed.
SH77397. Silver denarius, RIC IV 107.1a (S), RSC III 12; Hunter III 1, cf. BMCRE V p. 508, M82 (antoninianus, but denarius noted); SRCV II -, NGC AU (about uncirculated) (3819479-44); full circle centering, mint luster, weight 2.935 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 11 Apr 217 - mid May 218 A.D.; obverse M OPEL DIADVMENIANVS CAES, bare-headed and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINC IVVENTVTIS (prince of youth), Diadumenian standing slightly left, head left, in military dress, baton in right hand, scepter nearly vertical in left hand, legionary aquila and standard standing in ground behind him on right; certified (slabbed) by NGC; ex FORVM (2009); scarce; $670.00 (€596.30)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS77389. Silver denarius, RIC II 137a, RSC II 1326, Strack II 80, BMCRE III 314, Hunter II 112, SRCV II 3539 var. (laureate, draped, and cuirassed), EF, superb portrait, fine style, light rose toning, light marks, slightly ragged flan, weight 3.473 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 123 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar with patera in right hand, resting left elbow on chair, SALVS AVG in exergue; $225.00 (€200.25)


Persian Empire, Carian Satrapy, Pixodaros, c. 340 - 335 B.C.

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Pixodarus was the youngest of the three sons of Hecatomnus, all of whom successively ruled. To secure the friendship of Philip II, king of Macedonia, Pixodarus offered his eldest daughter in marriage to his Philip's son Arrhidaeus. Arrhidaeus' ambitious younger brother, Alexander (later Alexander the Great) offered himself instead. Pixodarus eagerly agreed but Philip put an end to the scheme. Pixodarus died, apparently a natural death, before Alexander landed in Asia in 334 B.C. and was succeeded by his Persian son-in-law Orontobates.
SH90963. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 597; SNGvA 2375; SNG Keckman 280; SNG Kayhan 891; SNG Lockett 2913; BMC Caria p. 185, 5 ff.; Weber 6608; SGCV II 4966, gVF, some nicks or flan flaws, some pitting, toned, weight 7.000 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mylasa mint, c. 340 - 335 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo facing slightly right; reverse ΠIΞΩ∆APOY, Zeus Labraundos standing right, labrys (double-headed axe) over shoulder in right, lotus-tipped scepter vertical in left; $560.00 (€498.40)


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem), Syria Palestina

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After the First Jewish Revolt, the Jews were disbursed from Jerusalem and prohibited even from visiting. About 130 A.D. Hadrian established a colony on the site and built a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus on the temple mount. His actions prompted the Second Jewish Revolt or Bar Kochba Rebellion.
SH90827. Bronze AE 27, Kadman Aelia Capitolina 170 (same dies), Sofaer Collection 141, Meshorer Aelia 154, Rosenberger 89, F, weight 13.132 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Aelia Capitolina mint, obverse IMP C G MES Q TRA DECIVS AVG, laureate bust right; reverse COL AEL KAP COM P F, Serapis seated left on throne, kalathos on head, reaching right hand toward Cerberus at feet on left, long scepter vertical behind in left; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection; extremely rare; $480.00 (€427.20)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Tyre, Phoenicia

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Dido, the founder and first queen of Carthage, is primarily known from Virgil's Aeneid. Upon succeeding their father as king of Tyre, Dido's brother Pygmalion had her husband Sichaeus killed in a plot to seize his immense wealth. Dido, with a large group of friends and followers, escaped Tyre, carrying with them all of Sichaeus' treasure. As depicted on the reverse of this coin, Dido made a sacrifice at the temple of Melqart-Hercules before leaving. The reverse on some other Valerian types, we know of one example struck with this same obverse die, depict Dido in Carthage beginning construction.
RP75357. Bronze dichalkon, Unpublished in the many references examined by Forum, cf. SNG Righetti 2354 (radiate and cuirassed bust), Rouvier 2503 (same), VF, well centered, porous, flan adjustment marks, weight 11.064 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 180o, Tyre mint, Oct 253 - Jun 260 A.D.; obverse IMP CP LIC VALERIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL TVRO MET, Dido standing right, kalathos on head, extending both hands toward a distyle temple of Melqart-Hercules in perspective to upper right, club within the temple, flaming column altar at her feet, murex shell on right below temple; from the J. Berlin Caesarea Collection; the best of the few examples of the type known to Forum; extremely rare; $800.00 (€712.00)


Kingdom of Numidia, North Africa, Micipsa, 148 - 118 B.C.

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When King Masinissa died, rule was divided among his three sons by Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus, to whom Masinissa had given the authority to administer his estate. Micipsa received the Numidian capital of Cirta along with the palace and treasury, Gulussa the charge of war, and Mastarnable the administration of justice. After his brothers died, Micipsa alone controlled the kingdom.
GB62886. Bronze AE 27, SNG Cop 509 ff., SGCV II 6596, aF, weight 9.747 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta mint, 148 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head (Micipsa?) left with pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse rearing left, Punic letters below horse; $60.00 (€53.40)




  







Catalog current as of Monday, June 27, 2016.
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