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Segesta, Sicily, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Segesta, in the northwestern Sicily, was one of the major cities of the Elymians, one of the three indigenous peoples of Sicily. Ionian Greeks settled in the city and the Elymians were quickly Hellenized. Segesta was in eternal conflict with Selinus. The first clashes were in 580 - 576 B.C., and again in 454 B.C. In 415 B.C. Segesta asked Athens for help against Selinus, leading to a disastrous Athenian expedition in Sicily. Later they asked Carthage for help. After Carthage destroyed Selinus, Segesta remained a loyal ally. It was besieged by Dionysius of Syracuse in 397 B.C., and destroyed by Agathocles in 307 B.C., but recovered. In 276 B.C. the city allied with Pyrrhus, but changed sides and surrendered to the Romans in 260 B.C. Due to the mythical common origin of the Romans and the Elymians (both descendants of refugees from Troy), Rome designated Segesta a "free and immune" city. In 104 B.C., the slave rebellion led by Athenion started in Segesta. Little is known about the city under Roman rule. It was destroyed by the Vandals.
GB65636. Bronze AE 16, Calciati I p. 303, 53; BMC Sicily p. 137, 63; SNG Cop 590; SNG ANS -, Fair, weight 3.283 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Segesta mint, Roman rule, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse diademed head of Segesta right; reverse horseman standing left beside his horse, spear diagonal behind; very rare; $70.00 (€62.30)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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This is the first example of this reverse type for Constantius II from any mint handled by Forum. RIC lists it as scarce. We believe it is rare.
RL77934. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII 63 (S), LRBC I 1061, SRCV V 18013, Cohen VIII 196, aVF, green patina, coppery high points, tight flan, weight 1.400 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinopolis (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 342 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICT AVG (victory of the Emperor), Victory walking left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand, CONS[...] in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare type; $36.00 (€32.04)


The Maliens, Lamia, Thessaly, 325 - 300 B.C.

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The Malien tribe inhabited the area around the Malian Gulf. Lamia was their main town and only mint.

Philoctetes was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea, Thessaly. When Herakles put on a shirt stained with Hydra's blood, the blood poisoned him, tearing his skin and exposing his bones. To end his suffering, Herakles built for himself a funeral pyre. Only his friend Philoctetes would light it. As Herakles body burned, but his immortal side rose to Olympus. Philoctetes was given Heracles' bow and poisoned arrows. Later, the Greeks learned through a prophecy that they needed the bow and arrows of Herakles to defeat Troy. Philoctetes shot Paris with one of Herakles' arrows, and he later died from the poison. Philoctetes was among those chosen to hide inside the Trojan Horse, and during the sack of the city he killed many famed Trojans.
GB72645. Bronze chalkous, BCD Thessaly I 1093; BCD Thessaly II 125; Rogers 384 (Malia); Georgiou Lamia 16; SNG Cop 87; Traite IV 462, BMC Thessaly p. 35, 3 ff. (Malienses), F, flan crack, weight 1.775 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Lamia mint, 325 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet and necklace; reverse MAΛIEΩN, Philoktetes standing right, shooting bow at birds, one of which falls before him; quiver on the ground at his feet on right; rare; $60.00 (€53.40)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Stobi, Macedonia

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None of the references describe this bust. Josifovski identifies all dies for Severus with the Victory left reverse as laureate, draped, and cuirassed but this coin (and his coin 126 from the same dies) is not draped or cuirassed. We believe there is the slight trace of an aegis on the far shoulder. Varbanov references Josifovski.
RP73828. Bronze AE 26, Josifovski Stobi 126 corr. (same dies); Varbanov III 3860 (R3) corr.; BMC Macedonia p. 104, 5 var.; SNG Cop 331 var.; Lindgren II 1142 var., F, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, better than the Josifovski plate coin, light corrosion, weight 9.889 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Stobi mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVGV (from upper right), laureate bust right, aegis on far shoulder(?); reverse MVNICIPI STOBE (from upper right), Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; rare; $80.00 (€71.20)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP74291. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, aVF, green patina, porous, weight 9.092 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $60.00 (€53.40)


Halos, Thessaly, Greece, 3rd Century B.C.

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Alos or Halos was 10 km south of present-day Almyros. The city is mentioned by Herodotus as one of the places where the Persian king Xerxes stayed in the summer of 480 B.C. during his attack on Greece. The classical city was destroyed in 346 during the Third Sacred War, but was refounded in 302 by Demetrius Poliorcetes. This Hellenistic city lies very close to the surface and is greatly disturbed, but several houses have been excavated, as well as a part of the city walls. This city was abandoned in the mid-third century, perhaps after an earthquake. A Byzantine fort was the last building phase from Antiquity.
GB75129. Bronze dichalkon, Reinder series 6; Rogers 241, fig. 114; BCD Thessaly II 85, gF, rough, corrosion, weight 2.868 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 195o, Halos mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Phrixos, nude but for cloak billowing behind him, clinging to neck and chest of ram flying right, AX monogram to upper left; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 12 (1 Nov 2014), lot 268; ex Frank James Collection; $45.00 (€40.05)


Kierion, Thessaly, Greece, c. 400 - 344 B.C.

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Kierion was originally named Arne for the Nymph on the reverse of this coin. Most references, including BCD, identify the male god on the obverse as Zeus. Rogers and SNG Cop say Poseidon. Since, according to one myth, Arne became pregnant by Poseidon and bore the twins Aiolos and Boiotos, we think Poseidon is more likely.
BB62454. Bronze chalkous, cf. BCD Thessaly II 105.1; Rogers 173; SNG Cop 35; BMC Thessaly p. 15, 1; SNG Evelpidis 1516; HGC 4 679 (S), Fair, weight 2.492 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 255o, Kierion mint, c. 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right with a short neatly trimmed beard and fillet binding his hair; reverse KIEPIEIΩN, the nymph Arne kneeling right on right knee, looking left, her torso bare, leaning on right hand on the ground, tossing astragaloi with left; scarce; $40.00 (€35.60)


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The reverse inscription abbreviates, MAPKOΣ ANTΩNIONΣ AYTOKPATΩP ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAP AYTOKPATΩP. The bust of Libertas on the obverse "refers to the grant of freedom by the Triumvirs to Thessalonica in 42 BC after the battle of Philippi (the victory which is celebrated on the reverse)." -- RPC I, p. 29

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra loaned Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege, the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
SH63716. Bronze AE 31, BMC Macedonia p. 115, 63; RPC I 1551; Sear CRI 672; SNG Cop 374; SNG ANS 823, F, green patina, scratches, rough areas, weight 18.710 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 37 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛONKEΩN EΛEYΘEPIAΣ, diademed and draped bust of Eleutheria (Liberty) right, E (year 5) below chin; reverse M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT, Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; $135.00 (€120.15)


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Early 5th - Middle 4th Century B.C.

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This type has traditionally been attributed to Parion, Mysia or as a Celtic imitative of the Parion type. Based on find locations in the area of Plovdiv, Haskova, Stara Zagora and Yambol in Bulgaria, Topalov has reattributed this imitative type to the Thracian Odrysian Kingdom. He notes they may have been struck by a tribal mint or by one of the Greek cities within Odrysian territory to pay their annual tax to the tribe.
GA47646. Silver hemidrachm, Topalov Thrace p. 230, 55, F, toned, weight 2.992 g, maximum diameter 11.7 mm, Thracian, Greek city or tribal mint, early 5th - middle 4th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion); reverse incuse square containing angles in each corner forming a cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; ex Alex G. Malloy; $60.00 (€53.40)


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Early 5th - Middle 4th Century B.C.

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This type has traditionally been attributed to Parion, Mysia or as a Celtic imitative of the Parion type. Based on find locations in the area of Plovdiv, Haskova, Stara Zagora and Yambol in Bulgaria, Topalov has reattributed this imitative type to the Thracian Odrysian Kingdom. He notes they may have been struck by a tribal mint or by one of the Greek cities within Odrysian territory to pay their annual tax to the tribe.
GA47648. Silver hemidrachm, Topalov Thrace p. 230, 55, F, weight 3.260 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, Thracian, Greek city or tribal mint, early 5th - middle 4th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion); reverse incuse square containing angles in each corner forming a cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; ex Alex G. Malloy; $65.00 (€57.85)




  







Catalog current as of Monday, May 22, 2017.
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