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Kingdom of Quangnam (Southern Vietnam), The Nguyen Lords, Nguyen Phuc Khoat (Vo Vuong), 1738 - 1765

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In 1744 Nguyen Phuc Khoat proclaimed the southern region a kingdom and took the regnal name Vo Vuong. Although he listened to music by western missionaries, Vo Vuong banned both missionaries and Christianity. He expanded his territory, taking parts of Cambodia. The Vietnamese-Cambodian border established by the end of his reign remains the border today. After declining availability of coins became a serious problem, in 1746 he purchased zinc from Dutch merchants to cast coins. He also allowed over 100 private mints. Unfortunately, some of these mints mixed cheaper black lead (lead) with the white lead (zinc). In 1776, Le Quy Don wrote in Phu Bien Tap Luc ('Miscellaneous records in the border area'), "There was one kind of coin called Thien Minh Thong Bao, which had black lead mixed in and became very fragile. People refused to accept it because of its ugliness; therefore the trade did not go smoothly, coins were not circulated well."Vo Vuong

VN83962. Zinc cash, Barker 85.1, Toda 285, VF, weight 2.101 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, 1746 - 1765; obverse Thien Minh Thong Bao; reverse plain; $18.00 (€15.30)


Kingdom of Quangnam (Southern Vietnam), The Nguyen Lords, Nguyen Phuc Khoat (Vo Vuong), 1738 - 1765

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In 1744 Nguyen Phuc Khoat proclaimed the southern region a kingdom and took the regnal name Vo Vuong. Although he listened to music by western missionaries, Vo Vuong banned both missionaries and Christianity. He expanded his territory, taking parts of Cambodia. The Vietnamese-Cambodian border established by the end of his reign remains the border today. After declining availability of coins became a serious problem, in 1746 he purchased zinc from Dutch merchants to cast coins. He also allowed over 100 private mints. Unfortunately, some of these mints mixed cheaper black lead (lead) with the white lead (zinc). In 1776, Le Quy Don wrote in Phu Bien Tap Luc ('Miscellaneous records in the border area'), "There was one kind of coin called Thien Minh Thong Bao, which had black lead mixed in and became very fragile. People refused to accept it because of its ugliness; therefore the trade did not go smoothly, coins were not circulated well."Vo Vuong

VN83963. Zinc cash, Barker 85.2, Toda 285, VF, weight 2.032 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, 1746 - 1765; obverse Thien Minh Thong Bao; reverse plain, thin raised rim on edge; $18.00 (€15.30)


Vietnam, Nguyen Dynasty, Nguyen Thanh To (Minh Mang), 14 February 1820 - 20 January 1841 A.D.

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Minh Mang was the second emperor of the Nguyen dynasty of Vietnam, reigning from 14 February 1820 until his death, on 20 January 1841. He was well known for his opposition to French involvement in Vietnam and his rigid Confucian orthodoxy. He banned missionaries from Vietnam and seven missionaries were sentenced to death. Although he disagreed with European culture and thinking, he studied it closely and was known for his scholarly nature. In 1820, Captain John White of the US Navy was the first American to make contact with Vietnam, arriving in Saigon. Minh Mang was interested in purchasing artillery, firearms, uniforms and books, but a deal was not made. In 1833 the south revolted. Saigon was put under siege in December 1834 and fell nine months later in September 1835.Minh Mang

VN19873. Bronze cash, small flan (6 phan); Barker 101.13, Toda 228, VF, weight 2.282 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, 1820 - 1822 A.D.; obverse Minh Mang Thong Bao, narrow open Minh, closed short foot Bao; reverse plain; $7.00 (€5.95)


Vietnam, Nguyen Dynasty, Nguyen The To (Gia Long), 1 June 1802 - 3 February 1820

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A nephew of the last Nguyen lord who ruled southern Vietnam, at age 15, Nguyen The To (also known as Nguyen Anh) was forced into hiding when his family was slain in the Tay Son revolt. After several changes of fortune in which his loyalists regained and again lost Saigon, he befriended the French Catholic priest Pigneau de Behaine. Pigneau recruited volunteers to help him take the throne. From 1789, he advanced north, defeating the Tay Son, reaching the Chinese border 1802, and reuniting all Vietnam, from China down to the Gulf of Siam, after centuries of feudal warfare. He took the regnal name Gia Long, moved the capital from Hanoi to Hue, and reinstated Confucian education and civil service. In return for French support, he tolerated Catholic missionaries, which was increasingly restricted under his successors. Using French expertise, he modernized Vietnam's military, gained dominance in Indochina, and made Cambodia into a vassal state.Gia Long

VN84043. Zinc Cash (7 Phan), Barker 99.11, Toda 213, Krause KM173a, Schroeder 441, VF, thin patina and earthen deposits, weight 2.625 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, 1 Jun 1802 - 3 Feb 1820; obverse Gia Long Thong Bao; reverse That phan (right to left, seven phan); $20.00 (€17.00)


Japan, Nagasaki Trade Coins, 1659 - 1685, For Trade with Vietnam

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From 1641, under the Sakoku isolationist policy, Nagasaki was the only Japanese port open to trade with Vietnam. Japan traded silver and copper for raw silk, sugar spices and sandalwood. Nagasaki Trade Coins were cast from 1659 to 1685. By law, they could not bear the officially issued Kanei Tsuho inscription. The inscription on this type copies Chinese Northern Song Dynasty cash coins, inscribed Yuan Feng Tong Bao, issued 960 - 1122. The clerical script style on these imitatives is quite different from the Song coins. A string of these trade coins was worth 1 liang of silver in Japan but 10.5 liang of silver in Vietnam! Copies of this type were also cast in Vietnam; their style is even further removed from their Song prototypes.
JA20693. Bronze cash, Hartill EJC 3.170 ff. (copies Northern Song, Yuan Feng Ton Bao, Hartill 16.234), aVF, small azurite deposits, reverse double cast, weight 3.481 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, Nagasaki mint, early issue, 1659 - 1667; obverse Gen Ho Tsu Ho (Vietnamese: Nguyen Phong Thong Bao), li (clerical) script, clockwise, two dot Tsu; reverse plain, double cast; $9.00 (€7.65)


Japan, Nagasaki Trade Coins, 1659 - 1685, For Trade with Vietnam

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From 1641, under the Sakoku isolationist policy, Nagasaki was the only Japanese port open to trade with Vietnam. Japan traded silver and copper for raw silk, sugar spices and sandalwood. Nagasaki Trade Coins were cast from 1659 to 1685. By law, they could not bear the officially issued Kanei Tsuho inscription. The inscription on this type copies Chinese Northern Song Dynasty cash coins, inscribed Yuan Feng Tong Bao, issued 960 - 1122. The clerical script style on these imitatives is quite different from the Song coins. A string of these trade coins was worth 1 liang of silver in Japan but 10.5 liang of silver in Vietnam! Copies of this type were also cast in Vietnam; their style is even further removed from their Song prototypes.
JA20706. Bronze cash, Hartill EJC 3.176 (copies Northern Song, Yuan Feng Ton Bao, Hartill 16.234), VF, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 3.591 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, Nagasaki mint, 1668 - 1685; obverse Gen Ho Tsu Ho (Vietnamese: Nguyen Phong Thong Bao), li (clerical) script, clockwise, one dot Tsu, large characters; reverse plain; $6.00 (€5.10)


Japan, Nagasaki Trade Coins, 1659 - 1685, For Trade with Vietnam

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From 1641, under the Sakoku isolationist policy, Nagasaki was the only Japanese port open to trade with Vietnam. Japan traded silver and copper for raw silk, sugar spices and sandalwood. Nagasaki Trade Coins were cast from 1659 to 1685. By law, they could not bear the officially issued Kanei Tsuho inscription. The inscription on this type copies Chinese Northern Song Dynasty cash coins, inscribed Yuan Feng Tong Bao, issued 960 - 1122. The clerical script style on these imitatives is quite different from the Song coins. A string of these trade coins was worth 1 liang of silver in Japan but 10.5 liang of silver in Vietnam! Copies of this type were also cast in Vietnam; their style is even further removed from their Song prototypes.
JA20707. Bronze cash, Hartill EJC 3.174 (copies Northern Song, Yuan Feng Ton Bao, Hartill 16.234), aVF, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 3.107 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, Nagasaki mint, 1668 - 1685; obverse Gen Ho Tsu Ho (Vietnamese: Nguyen Phong Thong Bao), li (clerical) script, clockwise, two dot Tsu, small characters; reverse plain; $9.00 (€7.65)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21

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Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
SH82707. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 4, 150; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 48; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, aVF/F, excellent portrait, toned, obverse a little off center cutting off right side of legend, punches, bumps and scratches, weight 3.731 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 90o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 18 - 35 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; $360.00 (€306.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21

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Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
SH82708. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 4, 150; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 48; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, VF, bold high relief portrait, toned, a little off center, die wear, scratches, weight 3.679 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 270o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 18 - 35 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; $440.00 (€374.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21

Click for a larger photo
Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
RS82709. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 2, 146; RIC I 28 (S); BMCRE I 44; RSC II 16b; SRCV I 1763, F, dark heavy toning, undersized flan, slightly rough, areas on reverse unstruck, weight 2.774 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, early ornate style, 15 - 18 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with ornately decorated legs set on base, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, no footstool; scarce; $215.00 (€182.75)




  







Catalog current as of Monday, August 20, 2018.
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