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Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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In Greek mythology, the Sirens were dangerous creatures, who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island. In early Greek art, Sirens were represented as birds with large women's heads, bird feathers, and scaly feet. Later, they were represented as female figures with the legs of birds, with or without wings, playing a variety of musical instruments, especially harps. Later Sirens were sometimes depicted as beautiful women, whose bodies, not only their voices, were seductive.
SH84464. Electrum hemihekte, Unpublished in major references; Naville auction VII (1924), Bement Collection, lot 1435; CNG, Triton XI (8 Jan 2008), lot 253, aEF, tight flan, earthen deposits, weight 1.367 g, maximum diameter 8.8 mm, Ionia, uncertain mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse siren standing left; reverse incuse square punch; ex Numismatica Ars Classica, auction 92, part 2 (24 May 2016), lot 1476; this type is not published in the major references but many examples are known from auctions; rare; $1290.00 (1096.50)


Thurium (Thurioi), Lucania, Italy, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

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The head of Athena is probably that of the sea-goddess Athena Skyletria. The bull may be a symbol of Dionysos or may have been derived from the archaic coins of Sybaris and symbolize the river Krathis. A more romantic view is that the butting bull symbolizes the rushing waters of the fountain Thuria from which the city took its name. This denomination is described as a stater, nomos or didrachm in various references and sales listings.
GS84491. Silver nomos, cf. HN Italy 1799, SNG Munchen 1192, SNG Oxford 932, SNG Cop 1439, SNG ANS 992, F, high relief, classical style, weight 7.474 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Thurioi mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet ornamented with Scylla; reverse ΘOYPIΩN, bull butting right, right foreleg raised, double exergue line, fish in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; ex CNG e-auction 261 (3 Aug 2011), part of lot 512; ex Colin E. Pitchfork Collection ; $145.00 (123.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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The caduceus is a wand or rod, entwined at one end by two serpents, each of whose bodies folds again in the form of two half-circles, while the head passes above the wand. It was an attribute peculiar to Mercury.
RA84495. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 333; RIC V, part 2, 84; Schulzki AKG 78; Cunetio 2426; Elmer 381; Hunter IV 82; SRCV III 10984, aEF, fantastic caduceus detail, well centered, traces of silvering, brown toned copper, light corrosion, edge splits, weight 3.078 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 265 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse SAECVLO FRVGIFERO (fruitful age), winged caduceus; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, ex VAuction 304 (27 Feb 2014), lot 412; ex Ancient Imports; $150.00 (127.50)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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This is the first and only known specimen of a new type combining two dies published in H-H-J Nicopolis. The obverse is a die match to H-H-J Nicopolis 8.22.6.3, struck for Geta. The reverse is a die match to a contemporary type struck for his brother Caracalla, H-H-J Nicopolis 8.18.14.29. It is a new discovery but not completely unexpected because parallel issues for members of the imperial family were normal at Nikopolis.
RP84573. Bronze AE 18, Unpublished, confirmed as a new type by J. Hoeft, VF, green patina, nice style, part of obverse legend weak, tight flan, scratches, weight 3.149 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 225o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, Middle May - 8 June 218 A.D.; obverse Λ AVP KΛ - ΓETAC, bare-head, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC IC, head of bearded Herakles right, protruding chin; extremely rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
BZ84502. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson ornaments 45, VF, green patina, tight flan, detail of face not fully struck, encrustations, weight 10.063 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Greek(?) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse EMMANOVHL, facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger with crescent in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, to left IC, to right XC; reverse IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation above and below legend; $135.00 (114.75)


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Elephant Head), 128 B.C.

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The elephant head recalls the victory of L. Caecilius Metellus over Hasdrubal at Panormus in 250 B.C. and the capture of Hasdrubal's elephants. The moneyer is perhaps L. Caecilius Metellus Diadematus, Consul 117 B.C., or L. Caecilius Metellus Delmaticus, Consul 119 B.C.
RR84586. Bronze semis, Crawford 262/2, Sydenham 497, BMCRR Rome 1048, SRCV I 880, VF, nice dark green patina with buff earthen highlighting, tight partially ragged flan, weight 7.242 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 128 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind; reverse galley prow right, elephant head wearing bell facing right above, S (mark of value) right, ROMA below; ex CNG (part of bulk lot), ex RBW Collection; rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84284. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 63 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, Choice EF, well centered and struck, traces of silvering, edge cracks, some die wear, weight 3.199 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, PTR crescent in exergue; $90.00 (76.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84285. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 65 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, aEF, well centered and struck, light porosity, edge split and edge crack, weight 2.792 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, STR crescent in exergue; $85.00 (72.25)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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This coin refers Constantine's victory in the Sarmatian war in 322 A.D. According to Zosimus (lib. 2), Constantine routed the Sarmatae and drove them back beyond the Danube where they rallied to renew the fight. He defeated them and again put them to flight, taking a great number of prisoners. Their king, Rausimodus, was left among the slain.
RL84287. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 65 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 435, Cohen VII 487, SRCV IV 16284, Choice EF, attractive surfaces, nice portrait, some flatness of strike on reverse, small edge split, weight 3.058 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 - 324 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse SARMATIA DEVICTA (Samartia vanquished), Victory advancing right, treading on captive with left foot, trophy in right hand, palm frond in left hand, STR crescent in exergue; $95.00 (80.75)


Tamouda, Mauretania, 1st Century B.C.

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Tamuda (Tamusia) was founded by Berbers in the 3rd century B.C. There was likely a Phoenician presence in the next century, mainly for commerce. Rome occupied Tamuda during the reign of Augustus. Around 42 A.D., it was leveled by Roman garrisons during an insurrection. It was replaced with a fortified settlement, later a Roman castrum, and grew to be a major city of Mauretania Tingitana. Industry included fish salting and purple dye production. The region became fully Romanized, Christian and "pacified." By the time the Vandals arrived in the fifth century the city had disappeared from history and may have already been abandoned.
GB84542. Bronze AE 16, cf. Mazard 587 (anepigraphic), SNG Cop 719 (same), Mller Afrique 242 (neo-Punic TMDT behind head), SRCV II 6653 (same), F/VF, rough, dark green patina, weight 2.454 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tamouda (near Tetouan, Morocco) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head right; reverse two heads of grain, meander symbol and pellet between them; ex-RBW Collection; rare; $125.00 (106.25)




  







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