Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Price Reductions

Jul 17, 2019

Jul 15, 2019

Jul 14, 2019

Jul 12, 2019
Medieval & Modern Coins

Jul 11, 2019

Jul 10, 2019

Jul 08, 2019

Jul 06, 2019

Jul 02, 2019

Jun 30, 2019
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Price ReductionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Price Reductions

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

Click for a larger photo
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $2950.00 (2596.00)


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

Click for a larger photo
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH91292. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Mnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, VF, well centered, bold strike, high relief, light tone, flow lines, light marks, weight 17.196 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 90o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; ex Numismatic Lanz; $1530.00 (1346.40)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RS88834. Silver denarius, RIC II 256(d), RSC II 966, BMCRE III 680, Hunter II 223, Strack II 251, SRCV II 3507 var. (bare head, slight drapery), VF, excellent portrait, light toning, flow lines, light marks and scratches, small edge cracks, weight 3.277 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; $155.00 (136.40)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 125, Hadrian distributed imperial lands to small farmers.
RS88838. Silver denarius, RIC II 345(c), RSC II 363, BMCRE III 497, Hunter II 170, Strack II 209, SRCV II -, Choice VF, excellent portrait, well centered, some light marks and scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.251 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Victory seated left on stool, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; $140.00 (123.20)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RS88839. Silver denarius, RIC II 160, RSC II 353, BMCRE III 356, Hunter II 139, Strack II 183, SRCV II -, Choice VF, superb portrait, light toning, edge splits, weight 3.206 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Roma standing right, left foot on helmet, inverted spear in right hand, parazonium at side in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; $135.00 (118.80)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Coins dedicated to Salus Augusti, like this coin, probably indicate the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RS88841. Silver denarius, RSC II 1331, BMCRE III 721 note, RIC II 269 (S), Strack II 265, Hunter III -, SRCV II -, Choice VF, excellent portrait, well centered, reverse die wear, small edge cracks, weight 3.526 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 137 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing half left, head left, from patera in right hand rising up from altar, long scepter in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; scarce; $140.00 (123.20)


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, 275 - 215 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Hieron II was tyrant and then king of Syracuse, c. 270 to 215 B.C. His rule brought 50 years of peace and prosperity, and Syracuse became one of the most renowned capitals of antiquity. He enlarged the theater and built an immense altar. The literary figure Theocritus and the philosopher Archimedes lived under his rule. After struggling against the Mamertini, he eventually allied with Rome.
GB81527. Bronze AE 19, cf. Calciati II p. 395, 197 ff.; SNG Cop 844 ff., SNG ANS 964 ff., SGCV I 1223 (various controls), aVF, well centered, nice patina, weight 5.663 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, 275 - 215 B.C.; obverse head of Poseidon left; reverse ornamented trident head, dolphins at sides, IEPΩ-NOΣ low across field divided by shaft, uncertain control marks below; ex Forum (2014); $90.00 (79.20)


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 195 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
After Apollo insulted him, Eros (cupid) shot Apollo with an arrow that caused him to fall in hopeless love with Daphne, a mortal woman. Eros shot Daphne with an arrow which made her incapable of loving Apollo. Nevertheless Apollo pursued her, and out of desperation Daphne escaped by having herself turned into a laurel. Ever after, winners of the games to honor Apollo wore wreaths of laurel in honor of Apollo's Daphne.
RY88144. Bronze dichalkon, McAlee 149 var. (rev. legend counterclockwise, B control not recorded); BMC Galatia p. 165, 119 var. (no control), VF, dark patina, a little off center, weight 2.611 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch mint, 195 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEWN THC MHTPOΠOΛEWC, laureate and draped bust of Apollo right; reverse ET(OV?) - EꟼP (year 195 [Caesarean Era]) clockwise from upper right, laurel branch, B (Greek control number) to lower right; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $50.00 (44.00)


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
The Battle of Antioch. After Macrinus foolishly cut legionary pay, Legio III Gallica hailed Elagabalus as emperor on 16 May 218. Macrinus sent cavalry but they too joined Elagabalus. Macrinus finally abandoned his pay cut and paid a bonus, but it was too late. Legion II Parthica defected. General Gannys, the commander of Elagabalus' forces, decisively defeated Macrinus was just outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Macrinus shaved off his hair and beard and fled, disguised as a member of the military police. He was recognized by a centurion at Chalcedon on the Bosporus, taken back to Antioch and executed.
RP88069. Bronze provincial as, Butcher 465a (same rev. die), McAlee 34 (v. rare) corr. (obv. leg.), cf. BMC Galatia p. 198, 389, SNG Cop -, VF, dark green patina with reddish earthen highlighting deposits, light scratches and marks, light porosity, weight 4.463 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, group 2; obverse AV K M O C MAKPINOC CE, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse large S C, ∆ E above, eagle right with had left below, all within wreath closed at the top with a star; very rare; $90.00 (79.20)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Rabbathmoba-Areopolis, Provincia Arabia

Click for a larger photo
Rabbathmoba, probably the Biblical Ir-Moab, was conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan.
RP84127. Bronze AE 27, Sofaer 5; Spijkerman p. 264, 8; cf. Rosenberger IV 1-3 (bust and legend variations, etc.); SNG ANS 1414 (same), VF, no patina, weight 6.492 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rabbathmoba-Areopolis mint, obverse AVT KAIC Λ CEΠ - CEOVHPOC ΠEB, laureate bust right; reverse RABBAΘM-WBHNWN APHC, cult statue of Ares standing facing in military dress, sword erect in right hand, spear and round shield in left hand, on platform with four legs set on base; rare; $45.00 (39.60)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, July 18, 2019.
Page created in 0.767 seconds.
FORUM ANCIENT COINS