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Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C., Apameia Civic Coinage

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This rare civic coinage type, without the portrait of the Seleukid King, was only issued for one year, 150 - 149 B.C.

Apameia was on the right bank of the Orontes River, about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria, overlooking the Ghab valley. Originally named Pharmake, it was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator in 300 B.C., who renamed it after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The fortress was placed upon a hill; the windings of the Orontes, with the lake and marshes, gave it a peninsular form. Seleucus had his commissariat there with 500 elephants, 30,000 mares, and 300 stallions. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apameia the basis of his operations. Located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce, the city flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis, boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade.
Great Colonnade at Apamea

GB59706. Bronze AE 17, BMC Galatia p. 233, 1, Lindgren-Kovacs 2029, Cohen DCA 134, VF, green patina with red earthen highlighting, obverse off center, scratches, edge crack, weight 4.278 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 150 - 149 B.C.; obverse turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right; reverse AΠAMEΩN, warrior advancing left, looking back right, extending right hand, spear and shield in left, ΓΞP (year 163 of Seleucid Era) left; rare; $70.00 (€59.50)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Dionysus, 144 - c. 142 B.C.

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After his father was deposed by Demetrius II, the general Diodotus Tryphon nominated Antiochus VI as king. He gained the allegiance of most of the Seleucid domain, including Judaea, but was actually only a puppet of the general. He died after "ruling" for two years. He was likely assassinated under orders from Tryphon, who then made himself king.
SH90305. Bronze serrated AE 22, Houghton-Lorber II 2006c, SNG Spaer 1774, Houghton CSE 249, SNG Cop 304 var. (control), HGC 9 1043 (C-S), VF, nice style, green patina, bumps and marks, weight 7.923 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. mid-143 - 142 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos VI right, wearing ivy wreath; reverse elephant walking left, holding torch in trunk, BAΣIΛEΩS ANTIOXOY above, EΠIΦANOYΣ ∆IONYΣOY in exergue, ΣTA over star (control symbols) to the right; ex Forum (2010); $70.00 (€59.50)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

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The kithara (cithara) was an ancient stringed musical instrument resembling the lyre. The lyre was a simpler folk-instrument with two strings and tortoise shell body. The kithara had seven strings and a flat back. A symbol of Apollo, who was credited with inventing it, the Kithara's origins were likely Asiatic. The kithara was primarily used by professional musicians, called kitharodes. In modern Greek, the word kithara has come to mean "guitar."
GB76831. Bronze AE 14, Houghton-Lorber 528, SNG Spaer 365, HGC 9 278, VF, desert patina, weight 2.492 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 180o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, spiral curls down neck; reverse kithara, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, anchor flukes right in exergue, control symbols outer right and left; $36.00 (€30.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

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Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as King.
GB71666. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber 565(2)b, SNG Spaer 348A, Newell WSM 1312, HGC 9 254 (R2), SNG Cop 87 var. (no monogram), BMC Seleucid -; c/m: Houghton-Lorber -, aVF, oval flan, edge crack, light encrustation and corrosion, weight 4.254 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 315o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse the Dioscuri galloping on horseback right, spears raised in right hands; reverse Athena Promachos standing right, brandishing javelin in right hand, shield in left hand, anchor with flukes left below, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in upward line on left, ANTIOXOY in upward line on right, monogram (control) inner left, countermark: ΠA monogram in a square punch; rare; $45.00 (€38.25)


Seleukeia Kalykadnos, Cilicia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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The Cilician Seleukia was founded by Seleukos I on the course of river Kalykadnos and soon became an important city, rivaling Tarsos.
GB72009. Bronze AE 19, SNG Levante 692 (same reverse die); SNG BnF 923; Weber 7588; BMC Lycaonia p. 130, 11 - 14 var. (monograms), gVF, light corrosion, spot of encrustation, weight 4.465 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia Kalykadnos mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, ΣA upward behind; reverse ΣEΛEYKEΩN TΩN ΠPOΣ TΩI KAΛYKA∆NΩI, forepart of horse right, AΘH above, AΘH below; scarce; $65.00 (€55.25)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos II Kallinikos, 246 - 226 B.C.

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The Seleukid Empire was under attack by Egypt when Kallinikos assumed the throne. He lost much of Thrace and coastal Anatolia to Ptolemy III. While he was fighting, his mother made his younger brother Antiochos Hierax joint ruler. Kallinikos agreed to partition the empire; however, Hierax wanted it all and Hierax and his Galatian mercenaries defeated him. Kallinikos managed to retain the lands east of the Tauros. The War of the Brothers weakened the empire, permitting regions such as Parthia to secede. Anatolia was soon lost. Kallinikos died after a fall from his horse.
GB73944. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber I 692(2), Newell WSM 1015, SNG Cop 112, HGC 9 322, cf. SNG Spaer 404 (uncertain controls), BMC Seleucid p. 17, 20 (same), gVF, nice green patina, crowded flan small than dies, obverse a little off-center, some earthen encrustation, weight 7.792 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 244 - 229 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse Nike standing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left over shoulder, large anchor flukes up inner left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on the right, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on the left (off flan), EY outer left (control, off flan), monogram (control) outer right; $50.00 (€42.50)


Seleukid Kingdom, Achaios, 220 - 214 B.C.

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Achaios was an uncle of Antiochos III. He proclaimed himself King in Anatolia. After a two-year siege of his capital of Sardes, Lydia, he was captured and beheaded.
GY76100. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber I 956 var. (unlisted control symbol), SNG Spaer 834 var. (same), Newell WSM 1442 var. (same), HGC 9 436 (S-R1), VF, nice green patina, weight 3.314 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 220 - autumn or winter 214 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse eagle standing right, head right, wings closed, wreath in talons, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / AXAIOY in two flanking downward lines, X (control symbol) outer right; unpublished extremely rare variant; $270.00 (€229.50)


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius II Nikator, 146 - 138 and 129 - 125 B.C.

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Demetrius II ruled for two periods, separated by years of captivity in Parthia. He gained the throne with the help of Egypt, but general Diodotus rebelled, took Antioch and made Antiochus VI Dionysus his puppet king. Demetrius then ruled part of the kingdom from Seleucia. In 38 B.C. he attacked the Parthians but was defeated and captured, ending his first reign. The Parthians released him in 129 B.C. when his brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes, marched against Parthia. They hoped the brothers would fight a civil war but the Parthians soon defeated Sidetes, and Demetrius returned to rule Syria. His second reign portraits show him wearing a Parthian styled beard. His second reign ended when he was defeated and killed by yet another usurper set up by Egypt, Alexander II Zabinas.
GY78036. Bronze AE 23, Houghton-Lorber II 1912.1d; Babelon Rois 1229; BMC Seleucids p. 61, 31; SNG Spaer 1615 ff. var. (monograms); HGC 9 992 (R1-2), F, well centered, weight 11.944 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st reign, 146 - 145 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Zeus right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆HMHTPIOY ΘEOY ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY NIKATOPOΣ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in extended right, resting left hand on grounded bow, MYT monogram left and ΠA monogram right in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $32.00 (€27.20)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Dionysus, 144 - c. 142 B.C.

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After his father was deposed by Demetrius II, the general Diodotus Tryphon nominated Antiochus VI as king. He gained the allegiance of most of the Seleucid domain, including Judaea, but was actually only a puppet of the general. He died after "ruling" for two years. He was likely assassinated under orders from Tryphon, who then made himself king.
GY84863. Bronze serrated AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 2006b, SNG Spaer 1771, Babelon 1009, Houghton CSE 248 ff. var. (control), SNG Cop 304 var. (same), HGC 9 143 (C-S), VF, dark green patina with buff earthen highlighting, centration dimples, weight 7.602 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. mid-143 - 142 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos VI right, wearing ivy wreath; reverse elephant walking left, holding torch in trunk, BAΣIΛEΩS ANTIOXOY above, EΠIΦANOYΣ ∆IONYΣOY in exergue, ΣTA over palm frond (control symbols) to right; scarce; $100.00 (€85.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Dionysos, 144 - 142 B.C.

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Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). It was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator, who renamed it from Pharmake to Apamea, after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The Seleukids' elephant breeding and training camp was at Apamea. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apameia the basis of his operations. At a strategic crossroad on the road to Cappadocia, Apamea was an important trade center in Roman Asia and flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. The city boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade. The ruins of Apamea, with an enormous and highly ornamental acropolis, are about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria.Great Colonnade at Apamea

GY85851. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 2015(1)c; Lindgren-Kovacs 1836 var. (∆P below), BMC Seleucid p. 65, 27 (IΓ lower left); HGC 9 1044, VF, earthen encrustation, porosity, marks and scratches, edge cracks, beveled obverse edge, weight 8.918 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 144 - 142 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos VI right; reverse Kantharos, palm frond inner right, control letter or monogram in exergue (off flan), BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EΠIΦANOΣ ∆IONYΣOY in four downward lines the first two in the right, the last two on the left; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $95.00 (€80.75)




  







Catalog current as of Saturday, October 20, 2018.
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