Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Price Reductions

Feb 19, 2019

Feb 18, 2019
Medieval & Modern Coins

Feb 17, 2019

Feb 16, 2019
Medieval & Modern Coins

Feb 13, 2019

Feb 12, 2019

Feb 11, 2019
Books & Supplies

Feb 10, 2019

Feb 07, 2019
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Price ReductionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Price Reductions

Side, Pamphylia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Side was founded by Greeks from Cyme, Aeolis, most likely in the 7th century B.C. The settlers started using the local language and over time forgot their native Greek. Excavations have revealed inscriptions written in this language, still undeciphered, dating from as late as the 2nd century B.C. The name Side is from this indigenous Anatolian language and means pomegranate.
GB90296. Bronze AE 18, BMC Lycia p. 151, 70 (with same Helios countermark); SNG Cop 411 (same); SNG BnF 750 ff.; SNG PfPs 501; Lindgren -, VF, unusually broad flan with full legends, nice green patina, reverse flattened by countermarking, weight 2.667 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Side (Antalya Province, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, in crested Corinthian helmet; countermarks: facing head of Helios, helmeted head of Athena right, ΣI∆HTΩN horizontal above; reverse Nike advancing left, holding wreath; wearing long chiton, peplos around waist and left arm, pomegranate in left field, ΣI∆H−TΩN horizontal above divided by Nike's head; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; $45.00 (€38.25)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS86667. Silver denarius, RIC IV C390, RSC III 230, BMCRE V C29, Hunter III C10, SRCV II 7108, Choice aEF, superb portrait, well centered, light toning, reverse die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.246 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, reign of Caracalla, 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, looped plait from ear around back of neck; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing facing, head left, veiled, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $120.00 (€102.00)


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Between 209 and their father's death in February 211, both brothers were shown as equally mature young men with a short full beard. Both sons were presented as equally suitable heirs to the throne, showing thus more "depth" to the dynasty. Between the death of Septimius Severus and the assassination of Geta, Caracalla's portraits did not change, while Geta was depicted with a long beard with hanging hairs much like his father, a strong indication of Geta's efforts to be seen as the "true" successor of his father.
RS86671. Silver denarius, RIC IV 88, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 65, SRCV II -, Choice EF, nearly as struck except for light toning, fantastic portrait, luster in recesses, perfect centering on a broad flan, some legend just a little weak, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.250 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 210 - 212 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG V (the 5th liberality [distribution of gifts to the people] by the Emperor), Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $270.00 (€229.50)


Roman Civil War, Vitellius, c. 69 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This coin is M71 in Butcher, K. & M. Pointing, The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage: From the Reform of Nero to the Reform of Trajan (Cambridge, 2015). There is a tiny drill hole on the edge where silver was extracted for testing. This was an important coin in the study, with test results indicating 93.9% silver bullion and Gallic isotope ratios strongly suggesting similarity with other Vitellius coins from Gallia, not coins minted for Galba.
RS86684. Silver denarius, Butcher-Pointing M71 (this coin), RIC I Civil Wars 121, BMCRE I 65, RSC I Galba 363, BnF I 75, Martin 7, EF, toned, tight flan, light corrosion, test drill hole on edge, weight 3.127 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Southern Gaul(?) mint, c. 69 A.D.; obverse clasped hands, FIDES above, EXERCITVVM below; reverse clasped hands, FIDES above, PRAETORIANORVM curving along the edge below; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Helios, auction 4 (Munich, 14 Oct 2009), lot 270; ex Coll. A. Lynn collection; ex Classical Numismatic Group, auction 54 (14 June 2000), lot 1484; ex P. DeVicci collection; rare; $1300.00 (€1105.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
"Trajan, having crossed the Ister by means of the bridge, conducted the war with safe prudence rather than with haste, and eventually, after a hard struggle, vanquished the Dacians. In the course of the campaign he himself performed many deeds of good generalship and bravery, and his troops ran many risks and displayed great prowess on his behalf. It was here that a certain horseman, after being carried, badly wounded, from the battle in the hope that he could be healed, when he found that he could not recover, rushed from his tent (for his injury had not yet reached his heart) and, taking his place once more in the line, perished after displaying great feats of valor." -- Roman History by Cassius Dio
RB77285. Orichalcum sestertius, Woytek 203o, BnF IV 564, RIC II 535 (S), Strack 360, Banti 215, BMCRE III -, Cayón -, aF, well centered, corrosion, pitting, weight 21.572 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 104 - 107 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust left; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan on horseback galloping right, in military dress, brandishing spear at Dacian warrior who is falling on his left knee, looking back at Trajan, raising both hands, and being trampled by horse's fore-hooves, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Sebastian Sondermann (Sep 2008); very rare bust left; $160.00 (€136.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21

Click for a larger photo
Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible
SH87939. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 1, 144; RIC I 26 (C); BMCRE I 34; SRCV I 1762; RSC II 16; SRCV I 1763, VF, centered on a compact flan, nice portrait, light rose toning, small punch under chin, light bumps and marks, weight 3.612 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 330o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, early 'plain' fine style, c. 15 - 18 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with plain legs set on base, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, no footstool; $720.00 (€612.00)


France, John II the Good, 26 April 1319 - 8 April 1364

Click for a larger photo
When John II the Good (French: Jean le Bon) came to power, France faced many disasters: the Black Death killed nearly half its population, there were popular revolts, unemployed mercenaries plundered the country, and losses to the English, including the Battle of Poitiers of 1356, in which John was captured. While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles had to suppress several rebellions. To liberate his father, in 1360 Charles concluded the Treaty of Brétigny, by which France surrendered territory and promised to pay an enormous ransom. In an exchange of hostages, including his son Louis, John was released from captivity to raise funds for his ransom. Upon his return in France, he created the franc to stabilize the currency. John tried to get rid of the mercenaries by sending them on a crusade, but Pope Innocent VI died shortly before their planned meeting in Avignon. After his son Louis escaped from captivity, John shocked and dismayed his people by announcing that for "good faith and honor" he would voluntarily return to captivity in England. John was greeted in London in 1364 with parades and feasts, however, a few months after his arrival he fell ill with an unknown malady and died. His body was returned to France, where he was interred in the royal chambers at Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son Charles V.
ME87717. Silver Blanc aux quadrilobes, Duplessy 297, Ciani 369, Lafaurie 300, Roberts 2511, F, toned, uneven strike with weak areas, tight flan cutting off parts of outer legend, porosity, weight 1.293 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, 1st emmision, authorized 22 Jan 1352; obverse outer legend: + BNDICTV: SIT: nOmE: DNI: nRI: DEI: IhV. XPI (the name of our Lord Jesus Christ be blessed, triple pellet stops), inner legend: + IO-HAn-nES - REX (King John, no stop); cross potent dividing the inner legend; reverse TVRONVS•CIVIS (City of Tours, pellet stop), Châtel tournois topped with flower, outer border of twelve lis within arches; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; very rare; $190.00 (€161.50)


Anglo-Gallic, Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Aquitaine, 1362 - 1372

Click for a larger photo
Edward of Woodstock (15 June 1330 - 8 June 1376), called the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault, and the father of King Richard II of England. He was the first Duke of Cornwall (from 1337), the Prince of Wales (from 1343) and the Prince of Aquitaine (1362-72). He was an exceptional military leader, and his victories over the French at the Battles of Crécy and Poitiers made him very popular in England during his lifetime. Edward died one year before his father, becoming the first English Prince of Wales not to become King of England. The throne passed instead to his son Richard II, a minor, upon the death of Edward III.
ME87706. Silver esterlin (sterling), Elias 192a (S), SCBC-SII 8133, Duplessy Féodales 1125A, Boudeau 511, Poey d'Avant –, F, centered, crowded flan (typical for type), uneven toning, clashed dies, light marks and scratches, weight 0.898 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 135o, Limoges mint, 2nd issue; obverse + : ED:PO:GIT·REG:An:L (Edwardus Primo Genetis Regis Anglie, Limoges, double annulet before legend, double rosette stops), half-length figure of Edward right, wearing floral wreath. sword in right hand over right shoulder, raising left hand in benediction; reverse : PRI-CPS - AQV-TAE (Prince of Aquitaine, double annulet before legend), long cross pattée, trefoil of three pellets in each quarter; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; $170.00 (€144.50)


France, Philip IV the Fair, 1285 - 1314

Click for a larger photo
King Philip IV, deeply in debt to the Knights Templar, took advantage of rumors about the Order's secret initiation ceremony. On Friday, October 13, 1307, he had the Order's members in France arrested (the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition). Pope Clement, under threat from Philip, instructed all Christian monarchs in Europe to arrest all Templars and seize their assets. Many Templars were tortured into giving false confessions and burned at the stake. Grand Master Jacques de Molay, burned alive in Paris in 1314, called out from the flames, "Dieu sait qui a tort et a pëché. Il va bientot arriver malheur à ceux qui nous ont condamnés à mort" ("God knows who is wrong and has sinned. Soon a calamity will occur to those who have condemned us to death"). Pope Clement died only a month later, and King Philip died in a hunting accident before the end of the year.
ME87711. Silver Obole or maille bourgeoise, Ciani 235, Duplessy 233, Lafaurie 238, Roberts 2641, VF, toned, well struck, tiny edge split, weight 0.432 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, Bourges mint, authorized 26 Jan 1311; obverse + PHILIP-PVS REX, Latin cross, dividing the legend at the bottom; reverse BVRGENSIS (annulet on N), NOV/VS in two lines; lis above, dividing legend and flanked on each side by three pellets arranged in a triangle; $170.00 (€144.50)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RA86673. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1684m (Samosata), RSC IV 792b (Antioch), Hunter IV J68 (uncertain Eastern), RIC V-1 J447 (Asia), SRCV III 10312 (uncertain Syrian), EF, white metal, mint luster, areas of light porosity, weight 3.925 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Syrian mint, 256 - 258 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PIETAS AVGG (to the piety of the two emperors), Valerian and Gallienus standing confronting each other, facing center, sacrificing at flaming altar in center, togate, on left holding eagle-tipped scepter, on right hand on parazonium on left side; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $125.00 (€106.25)




  







Catalog current as of Friday, February 22, 2019.
Page created in 0.672 seconds.
FORUM ANCIENT COINS