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Ancient Greek Coins of All Periods

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.


Sardes, Lydia, c 98 - 117 A.D.

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CTP in the reverse legend identifies the magistrate, Lo. Io. Libonianos, as a strategos. Strategos, plural strategoi, is Greek meaning "general." In the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Empires the term was also used to describe a military governor. In the modern Greek army, it is the highest officer rank.
RP82728. Bronze AE 16, RPC Online III 2393 (18 spec.); SNG Cop 508; SNG Leypold 1201; SNG Tatis 757; Imhoof-Blumer LS p. 139, 13; BMC Lydia p. 246, 75; Winterthur 3917, VF, attractive dark green patina, bumps and marks, earthen deposits, weight 2.366 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, time of Trajan, c. 98 - 117 A.D; obverse CAP∆IA-NΩN, draped youthful bust of Dionysus right, wearing ivy wreath; reverse CTP ΛO IO ΛI-BΩNIANOY, filleted thyrsus, bee to right; ex Numismatic Naumann GmbH auction 60, lot 326; $185.00 SALE PRICE $166.50


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Perinthus, Thrace

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A neocorate was a rank or dignity granted by the Roman Senate and the Emperor to certain cities which had built temples to the Emperor or had established cults of members of the Imperial family. The city itself was referred to as neokoros (pl. neokoroi). A temple dedicated to the emperor was also called neocorate. Starting in the 2nd century CE, the title appeared on many coins. There were approximately 37 cities holding the neocorate, concentrated in the province of Asia, but also in neighboring provinces. Severus rewarded Perinthus with the title Neokoros for the first time for their support against Pescennius Niger. The city received a second neocorate under Elagabalus.
RP83931. Bronze tetrassarion, CNT_2626, Schönert Perinthos 466, Varbanov III 193 (R5), Moushmov 4524, SNG Cop 741 var. (draped and cuirassed), BMC Thrace -, F, nice portrait, green patina, scratches, small edge crack, central dimples, weight 15.690 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 225o, Heraclea Perinthos (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 196 - 211 A.D.; obverse AY KΛ CEΠ CEYHPOC ΠE, laureate head right; reverse facade of a octastyle temple on double crepidoma with eight Corinthian columns, shield with umbo on pediment and acroteria on roof, ΠE−PIN/ΘI−ΩN flanking across field in two divided lines, NEΩKOPΩC in exergue; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Roman Hispania, Hacksilver Lot of 12 Cut Silver Coin Fragments, c. Before 50 B.C.

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Hacksilver lot of 12 cut silver coin fragments, reputedly all found in southern Spain. One Carthago Nova, cut 1/5 or 1/4 portion of a Hannibal shekel, 1.43g, cf. SNG BM 106 - 109, rare. Eleven cut fractions of Roman Republican denarii, mostly c. early 2nd century B.C.
LT87284. Silver fragment, cut fraction of a Hannibal shekel, plus 11 cut Republican denarii fragments, average VF, no tags or flips, the actual coin fragments in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $280.00 SALE PRICE $252.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
GS82736. Silver tetradrachm, Price P208, Müller Alexander P85, SNG München 972, SNG Fitzwilliam 3237, VF, high relief obverse, light toning, bumps and marks, obverse a little off center, weight 17.050 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 45o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, struck under the satrap Koinos, c. 322 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne with high back, nude to the waist, himation around hips sand legs, feet on footstool, right leg forward (archaic Alexander lifetime style), eagle in right hand, long scepter in left hand, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue (off flan), ΛA under seat above strut; $360.00 SALE PRICE $324.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Price dates this type 311 - 305 B.C. Houghton dates it 311 - 300 B.C. Houghton notes that Kritt down-dated the chronology due to the complexity of the emissions and that two hoards independently support the revised dating.
GS82739. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 82(4)a, Price 3751, Müller Alexander 735, SNG München 794, Armenak 138 - 139, HGC 9 10f, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, VF, bold strike with high relief dies, centered on a tight flan, toned with darker spots, bumps and marks, reverse double struck, weight 17.047 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Babylon mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI in left field, monogram within wreath under throne; $360.00 SALE PRICE $324.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS82741. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 41(3)c, Price 3818, Müller Alexander 267, Meydancikkale 1958 - 1960, SNG Cope 851, Newell WSM 9, HGC 6 12a, gVF, attractive style, high relief, light toning, tight flan, minor obverse die wear/damage, bumps and marks, weight 16.913 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 90o, Karrhai (Harran, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, forelegs tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on high back throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right foot drawn back, feet on footstool, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue, crescent over ∆I left, AYP monogram in circle below throne; $360.00 SALE PRICE $324.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, Strategos of Asia, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS82743. Silver tetradrachm, In the name of Alexander; Price 3713, Müller Alexander 717, SNG München 790, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered and struck with high relief dies, toned, tight flan, light bumps and marks, mild porosity, weight 16.528 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Babylon mint, under the satrap Peithon, 315 - 311 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, forelegs tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue, monogram in wreath left, KΛ under throne; $360.00 SALE PRICE $324.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue

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Lifetime issue! At the time of the Battle of Issus, Darius had his headquarters at Damascus. Alexander captured a great treasure there and established a mint in 330 B.C. or soon after to strike the silver into his coinage.
GS82753. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3214, Müller Alexander 1342, Demanhur 3247 - 3249, Newell Reattribution 180, VF, attractive style, light toning, obverse off center but full face on flan, bumps, marks, porosity, weight 16.932 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Damaskos mint, c. 330 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, forelegs tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ram forepart right in left field, A between struts under seat and ∆A below, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; very rare; $680.00 SALE PRICE $612.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck after Alexander's death, under either Perdikkas or Antipater, regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
GS82764. Silver tetradrachm, Price 112, Müller Alexander 854, Demanhur 1344- 1455, SNG Cop 684, SNG Alpha Bank 499, SNG Mün 283, SNG Ash 2594, Newell Reattribution 43, Troxell H2, Choice VF, well centered and struck, toned, bumps and marks, weight 16.928 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, under regent Antipater, c. 322 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Phrygian cap inner left; $320.00 SALE PRICE $288.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY82765. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 130(14)a, HGC 9 18a, Houghton CSE 915 var. (Λ∆), SNG Cop 16 var. (controls), BMC Seleucid -, aVF, struck with high relief dies, bumps and marks, obverse slight off center but face on flan, reverse crowded on tight flan, weight 16.867 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukia II mint, c. 296 - 280 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse Athena fighting in a quadriga of elephants right, anchor (Seleukid symbol) above, she is helmeted, brandishing javelin in her right hand, shield on her left arm, BAΣIΛEΩΣ upward on left, ∆A (controls) above elephants, ΣEΛEYKOY in exergue; $320.00 SALE PRICE $288.00











Catalog current as of Saturday, June 23, 2018.
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Ancient Greek Coins