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Ancient Greek Coins of All Periods

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes II - Artaxerxes II, c. 420 - 375 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia, Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire

SH86216. Gold daric, Carradice Type IIIb, group C (pl. XIV, 42); BMC Arabia pl. XXV, 12; SNG Cop 276; Meadows Administration 323; Sunrise 28, gVF, tight flan, marks, reverse struck with a worn broken punch, weight 8.328 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 420 - 375 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, bearded, crowned, wearing kidaris and kandys, quiver on shoulder, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand; reverse oblong irregular rectangular incuse punch; $2700.00 (2295.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 454 - 427 B.C.

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Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH86288. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 57 (c/γ); SNG Cop 305; BMC Lesbos p. 160, 44; Boston MFA 1703 (also palmette below); HGC 6 983 (R2); SNGvA -, VF, centered, scratches, tiny flan flaws, weight 2.520 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 90o, Mytilene mint, c. 454 - 428/427 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse two confronted ram heads butting, palmette above, all within incuse square; rare; $500.00 (425.00)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 478 - 387 B.C.

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Io was a priestess of Hera in Argos. Zeus lusted for her. In the version of the myth told in Prometheus Bound she initially rejected Zeus' advances, until her father threw her out of his house on the advice of oracles. According to some stories, Zeus then turned Io into a heifer to hide her from his wife; others maintain that it was jealous Hera that transformed Io. The female head on this coin can be identified as Io by the horn and the fillet with beaded tassels worn by heifers or bulls selected for sacrifice to Zeus, as seen in the image right. She was an ancestor of many kings and heroes such as Perseus, Cadmus, Heracles, Minos, Lynceus, Cepheus, and Danaus. The astronomer Simon Marius named a moon of Jupiter after Io in 1614.sacrificial_fillet

SH86290. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 96 (g/-); BMC Ionia p. 211, 57; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Kayhan -; Rosen -; Boston MFA -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, bumps and scratches, weight 2.494 g, maximum diameter 10.0 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 478 - 387 B.C.; obverse horned head of Io left, wearing sacrificial fillet ending in beaded tassels hanging from horns, seal (symbol of Phokaia) swimming left below; reverse quadripartite incuse square; rare; $400.00 (340.00)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 521 - 478 B.C.

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Phocaea, or Phokaia, was the northernmost Ionian city, on the boundary with Aeolis. The Phocaeans were the first Greeks to make long sea-voyages, developed a thriving seafaring economy, became a great naval power, and founded the colonies Massalia (Marseille, France), Emporion (Empries, Spain) and Elea (Velia, Italy). They remained independent until all of mainland Ionia fell to Croesus of Lydia (c. 560-545 B.C.). In 546 B.C., Lydia was conquered by Cyrus the Great of Persia. After the Greeks defeated Xerxes I, Phocaea joined the Delian League, but later rebelled with the rest of Ionia. In 387 B.C., Phocaea returned to Persian control. After Alexander, it fell under Seleucid, then Attalid, and finally Roman rule.
SH86291. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 32, 7 (c/γ); Weber III 5736 (= Bodenstedt 7); Boston MFA 1906, SNG Kayhan -; SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Ionia -, Rosen -, EF, superb archaic style, well struck, tight flan, bumps and scratches (mostly on edge), tiny edge crack, weight 2.566 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 521 - 478 B.C.; obverse archaic style head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet, almond shaped eye, slight smile, long hair in rows of dots, dotted necklace, seal upward behind; reverse quadripartite incuse square; $2000.00 (1700.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

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Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH86293. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 99; SNG Cop 321; SNGvA 1729; SNG Lockett 2763; BMC Lesbos p. 66, 98; Boston MFA 1735; Weber 5631; Pozzi 2331; HGC 6 1025 (R1), VF, light scratches, tight flan, weight 2.547 g, maximum diameter 10.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse head of Kabeiros right, wearing pileus wreathed with laurel, two stars flanking cap; reverse head of Persephone right, wearing round earring, hair rolled, within linear square; $550.00 (467.50)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 477 - 387 B.C.

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Recent archaeological surveys have shown that the city of Phocaea was large for the archaic period. Herodotus gives an idea of the size of Phocaea by the describing the walls of Phocaea as having a length of several stadia.
SH86294. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 89 (c/-?), McClean 8253, SNG Kayhan 535, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Ionia -, Boston MFA -, VF, attractive style, centered on a tight flan, weight 2.529 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 477 - 388 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wreathed in ivy, small seal (symbol of Phokaia) downward behind; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarce; $400.00 (340.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 412 - 378 B.C.

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Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH86296. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 75; SNG Cop 327; SNGvA 1725; SNG Fitzwilliam 4358; BMC Lesbos p. 163, 69; Boston MFA 1714; Weber 5644; HGC 6 1001 (R1), VF, fine style, toned, tight flan, light marks, obverse off center, weight 2.547 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 90o, Mytilene mint, c. 412 - 378 B.C.; obverse head of Kybele right, wearing a pendant earring and a turreted crown ornamented with a scanthus pattern; reverse head of Hermes right, wearing petasos, tied around chin, strap around back of head, in linear square within shallow incuse square; $560.00 (476.00)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 477 - 387 B.C.

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Recent archaeological surveys have shown that the city of Phocaea was large for the archaic period. Herodotus gives an idea of the size of Phocaea by the describing the walls of Phocaea as having a length of several stadia.
SH86297. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 89 (a/-), McClean 8253, SNG Kayhan 535, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Ionia -, Boston MFA -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, light marks, weight 2.550 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 477 - 388 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wreathed in ivy, small seal (symbol of Phokaia) downward behind; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarce; $460.00 (391.00)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 372 - 327 B.C.

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According to Herodotus the Phocaeans were the first Greeks to make long sea-voyages, having discovered the coasts of the Adriatic, Tyrrhenia and Spain. Herodotus relates that they so impressed Arganthonios, king of Tartessus in Spain, that he invited them to settle there, and, when they declined, gave them a great sum of money to build a wall around their city.
SH86298. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 97 (b/-); SNGvA 2123; BMC Ionia p. 208, 36; Boston MFA 1924 (identified as Pan); SNG Kayhan -, Rosen -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, mild die wear, bumps and scratches, weight 2.521 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 364 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos left, wreathed in ivy with berries, hair rolled, small seal (symbol of Phokaia) left below; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarce; $600.00 (510.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 377 - 326 B.C.

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Mytilene was famous in ancient times for its great output of electrum coins struck from the late 6th through mid - 4th centuries B.C. The usual denomination was the hekte (1/6th stater). Warwick Wroth noted in the British Museum Catalog, "The Sixths of [this Lesbos electrum series] form one of the most beautiful coin-series of the ancient world. This will be evident from a glance."
SH86299. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 100A; SNG Cop 317; SNGvA 1715; BMC Lesbos p. 165, 87; Boston MFA 1720; HGC 6 1026 (S), VF, attractive style, light scratches, weight 2.557 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 377 - 326 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head of Artemis right, hair in sphendone, small coiled snake lower left, all within linear frame and incuse square; scarce; $650.00 (552.50)











Catalog current as of Friday, January 19, 2018.
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Ancient Greek Coins