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Ancient Greek Coins of All Periods

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.


Roman Provincial Egypt, Terracotta "Coin Mold," c. 316 - 320 A.D.

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Some call these counterfeiter's molds. However, Malloy notes on his tag for this specimen, "Originally thought to be molds for producing coins, now it is thought that these terracotta impressions themselves were used as a crude medium of exchange."
RX85456. Unofficial pseudo coin used for small change, VF, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, c. 316 - 320 A.D.; obverse retrograde impression of: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head of Galerius right (obverse of Galerius follis, c. 308 A.D.); reverse retrograde impression of: IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing facing, head left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle left at feet on left, K above eagle on left, wreath over X over A right in right field, ALE in exergue (reverse of Alexandria mint follis, 316 - 317 A.D., RIC VII Alexandria 17 - 19); $300.00 (267.00)


Anatolia (Lycia?), 5th Century B.C.

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Although unlisted in the major references, a similar hemidrachm type was first published by 1897. Five obols of this type, including this coin, are listed on Coin Archives having been offered at auction in the last two decades.

The chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia, composed of the parts of three animals - a lion, a snake, and a goat or stag. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ending with a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GA85627. Silver obol, 5 specimens know from auctions, otherwise unpublished; cf. Boston MFA 2325 (hemidrachm), Greenwell 1897, p. 281, 2 (= Boston MFA 2325), VF, well centered, light marks, light corrosion, weight 0.647 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, die axis 270o, uncertain (Lycian?) mint, 5th century B.C.; obverse chimera standing (right?) with heads of a lion (in center with looking left), stag, and serpent, joined on one quadruped body at the center and radiating outward; reverse gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), snaky locks, tongue protruding, within incuse square; ex Roma e-sale 36, lot 112; extremely rare; $300.00 (267.00)


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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The reverse legend identifies the Consular Legate (Governor) Statius Longinus.
RP85598. Bronze AE 25, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.23.1.6 (R5), Varbanov I 3486 (R3), AMNG I/I 1721 var. (cuirassed), Moushmov 1249; BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, VF, nice style, green patina, some light corrosion, edge crack, weight 8.601 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Statius Longinus, 217 - 218 A.D.; obverse AVT K M OΠEΛ CEV - MAKPINOC, laureate head right; reverse VΠ CTA ΛONΓINOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN Π,POC ICT (ending in exergue), Zeus seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; ex Forum (2009); $165.00 (146.85)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C.

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In "Le Tresor de Gezeir (lac Mariout, Alexandrie)" in Revue Numismatique 2006, T. Faucher and M. Shahin attribute this type to Ptolemy IX. Their attribution is based in part on the SC ICT (ending in exergue), Zeus seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; ex Forum (2009); $165.00 (146.85)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C.

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In "Le Tresor de Gezeir (lac Mariout, Alexandrie)" in Revue Numismatique 2006, T. Faucher and M. Shahin attribute this type to Ptolemy IX. Their attribution is based in part on the SWexergue
), Zeus seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, patera in extended right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; ex Forum (2009); $165.00 (146.85)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C.

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In "Le Tresor de Gezeir (lac Mariout, Alexandrie)" in Revue Numismatique 2006, T. Faucher and M. Shahin attribute this type to Ptolemy IX. Their attribution is based in part on the SW monogram referring to the epithet of Ptolemy IX Soter II. This same monogram is, however, found on silver and gold coins from early in the reign of Ptolemy V, where it may refer to the chief minister Sosibius. Sosibius appears to have had complete control of the administration under Ptolemy IV. Under the young Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Sosibius assumed the guardianship but in conjunction with his rival insidious Agathokles. In time, Agathokles supplanted Sosibius and had him put to death.
GP85476. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1191 (Ptolemy IV, Cyprus, 219 B.C.), Weiser 114 (Ptolemy V, Tyre), SNG Cop 534 (Ptolemy V), Noeske 187 (same), Cohen DCA 35 (same), VF, tight flan, some areas of weak strike, central dimples, weight 9.267 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Phoenician mint, 203 - 202 B.C.; obverse horned head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin, K behind; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEOΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, head left, Ω over Σ left, LΓ (regnal year 3) right; rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Thurium (Thurioi), Lucania, Italy, c. 410 - 350 B.C.

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Nearly 70 years after Sybaris was destroyed by the Crotoniats, a new colony was founded on the site on the Gulf of Taranto. Soon after, on the advice of an oracle, the settlers moved a short distance away near a fountain named Thuria, after which the new city was named.
SL85594. Silver nomos, HN Italy 1791c, SNG ANS 1041, SNG Cop 1442, SNG ANS 1028, SNG Mnchen 1196, BMC Italy -, NGC VF, strike 5/5, surface 4/5 (3987747-003), weight 7.67 g, maximum diameter 22 mm, die axis 180o, Thourioi mint, c. 410 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing necklace and crested Athenian helmet decorated with Skylla holding trident in right hand, rudder over shoulder in left hand; reverse ΘOYPIΩN, bull butting right, lashing tail, head lowered, HP monogram above, tunny fish right below; NGC certified (slabbed); ex Heritage auction 231729, lot 63004; $285.00 (253.65)


Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SL85595. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, Dewing 1611, SGCV I 2526, NGC MS, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (4377469-089), well centered, bold strike, some light marks, weight 17.18 g, maximum diameter 24 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; NGC certified (slabbed); ex Heritage Auction 231729, lot 63023; $2350.00 (2091.50)


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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Gaius Licinius Mucianus (named on this coin) was governor of Syria. When he failed to put down the Jewish revolt, Vespasian was sent to replace him. After the death of Galba, Mucianus and Vespasian both swore allegiance to Otho. Mucianus persuaded Vespasian to take up arms against Vitellius, who had seized the throne. They agreed Vespasian would settle affairs in the East, while Mucianus made would attack Vitellius. On his way to Rome, Mucianus defeated a Dacian invasion of Moesia. Mucianus reached Rome the day after Vitellius' death. Mucianus never wavered in his allegiance to Vespasian and was appointed consul for the third time in 72. As no mention is made of Mucianus during the reigns of Titus or Domitian, he probably died during the reign of Vespasian.
RP85562. Bronze AE 28, McAlee 319 (ex. rare, same dies), cf. RPC 4316 (not specifying obverse legend direction), aVF, nice portrait, dark patina with buff earthen highlighting, spots of light corrosion, obverse legend mostly weak or off flan, weight 11.757 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 15 Jan 69 - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse [IMP M OT]-HO - [CAE AVG] (counterclockwise from upper left), head laureate right, dot in field behind; reverse EΠI / MOYKIA/NOY AN/TIOXEΩ/N ET ZIP (legate Mucianus, of Antioch, year 117) in five lines within a linear circle in a laurel wreath; this variant with a counterclockwise obverse legend is extremely rare; ex Gemini auction XIII (6 Apr 2017), lot 158, ex Jyrki Muona Collection; $2250.00 (2002.50)


Syracuse, Sicily, Roman Rule, c. 130 - 70 B.C.

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GI85339. Bronze AE 22, Calciati p. 431, 233; SNG Cop 910; SNG ANS 1087; HGC 2 1475 (R1), aF, uneven green patina, weight 5.350 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, c. 130 - 70 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Ares right; reverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, Nike standing facing, wings spread, preparing to sacrifice bull prostate below; rare; $70.00 (62.30)


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, c. 275 - 215 B.C.

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Hieron II was tyrant and then king of Syracuse, c. 270 - 215 B.C. His rule brought 50 years of peace and prosperity. Syracuse became one of the most renowned capitals of antiquity. He enlarged the theater and built an immense altar. The literary figure Theocritus and the philosopher Archimedes lived under his rule. After struggling against the Mamertini, he eventually allied with Rome.
GB85340. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 347, 191; BMC Sicily p. 219, 620; SNG ANS 578 (Agathokles); SNG Munchen 1225 (same); HGC 2 1469 (S); SNG Cop 865 var. (IA above bull), F, nice style, dark green patina, tight flan, weight 5.293 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 275 - 269 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of Kore-Persephone left, wearing earrings and necklace, hair rolled and bound with barley wreath, poppy head behind neck; reverse bull butting left, club over I (magistrate initial) above, IE (magistrate initials) in exergue; $90.00 (80.10)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy X Alexander I and Kleopatra Berenike, 101 - 88 B.C.

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Alexander was the son of Ptolemy VIII and Cleopatra III. In 110 B.C., his mother deposed his brother Ptolemy IX and he became king with his mother as co-regent. In 109 B.C., Ptolemy IX took back the throne but in 107 B.C. Alexander again became king with his mother as co-regent. In 101 B.C., he had his mother killed, and then ruled with his niece and wife, Berenice III. When he died, Ptolemy IX regained the throne. When Ptolemy IX died, Ptolemy X's wife Berenice III took the throne for six months.
GP85356. Bronze didrachm, Svoronos 1712, Weiser 181, Cox Curium 113, SNG Cop -, Malter -, Noeske -, Hosking -, VF, edge crack, beveled obverse, flan casting sprues, weight 20.056 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Paphos mint, c. 100 - 90 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, heads left, wings closed, no symbol; $125.00 (111.25)











Catalog current as of Friday, September 22, 2017.
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Ancient Greek Coins