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Ancient Greek Coins of All Periods

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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The Battle of Antioch. After Macrinus foolishly cut legionary pay, Legio III Gallica hailed Elagabalus as emperor on 16 May 218. Macrinus sent cavalry but they too joined Elagabalus. Macrinus finally abandoned his pay cut and paid a bonus, but it was too late. Legion II Parthica defected. General Gannys, the commander of Elagabalus' forces, decisively defeated Macrinus was just outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Macrinus shaved off his hair and beard and fled, disguised as a member of the military police. He was recognized by a centurion at Chalcedon on the Bosporus, taken back to Antioch and executed.
RY85752. Bronze provincial as, McAlee 732(a)1 (same obverse die); Butcher 464a; SNG Cop 233; Waage 566; BMC Galatia p. 198, 386 var. (wreath closed with star), VF, green patina, porous, obverse slightly off center, light earthen deposits, weight 3.770 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K M O CE MAKPINOC CE, laureate head right; reverse large S C, ∆ above, E below, all within wreath closed at the top with a pellet within diamond; $80.00 (68.00)


Antioch, Roman Syria, 76 - 77 A.D.

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Minted under M. Ulpius Traianus, the legate of Syria, father of Trajan who later became emperor of Rome. Trajan was also in Syria as Tribunus legionis.
RY86240. Bronze trichalkon, McAlee 117, RPC II 2019, Wage 362, BMC Galatia p. 95, 95, aVF, under-size flan, obverse off center, earthen encrustation, weight 2.770 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 76 - 77 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN, towered, draped, and veiled bust of Tyche right; reverse burning, garlanded altar on ground line, ET EKP (year 125) in exergue; rare; $38.00 (32.30)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Laodicea ad Mare, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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Laodicea ad Mare prospered thanks to the excellent wine produced in the nearby hills and was also famous for its textiles, both of which were exported to all the empire. A sizable Jewish population lived in Laodicea during the first century. Under Septimius Severus the city was fortified and was made for a few years the capital of Roman Syria: in this period Laodicea grew to be a city of nearly 40,000 inhabitants and had even an hippodrome. Christianity was the main religion in the city after Constantine I and many bishops of Laodicea participated in ecumenical councils, mainly during Byzantine times. The heretic Apollinarius was bishop of Laodicea in the 4th century, when the city was fully Christian but with a few remaining Jews. An earthquake damaged the city in 494 A.D. Justinian I made Laodicea the capital of the Byzantine province of "Theodorias" in the early sixth century. Laodicea remained its capital for more than a century until the Arab conquest.
RP86245. Bronze AE 19, SNG Mnchen 944; SNG Hunterian 3226, SNG Cop 372 var. (bust); BMC Galatia p. 262, 105 var. (no clubs), VF, porous, reverse off center, weight 5.941 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 225o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVP - ANTONINVS - AVG, radiate bust right, bare shoulders seen from behind; reverse LAVDICEON, two naked wrestlers, standing confronted and grappling, wrestler on the left has his hand on his antagonist shoulder, clubs left and right, one behind each wrestler, ∆E exergue; scarce; $90.00 (76.50)


Antioch, Seleucia Pieria, Syria, c. 41 - 16 B.C.

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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch

RP86397. Bronze tetrachalkon, Hoover Syrian 1372, cf. McAlee 58 ff. (various dates), gF, green patina with earthen highlighting, weight 6.896 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 41 - 16 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ANTIOXEΩN / METPOΠOΛEΩΣ downward in two lines on right, AVTONOMOV downward on left, Zeus enthroned left, Nike in his extended right hand offering him a wreath, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, cornucopia (control symbol) low inner left, Caesarian era date in exergue off flan; $60.00 (51.00)


Leucas-Claudia (Balanea), Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, c. 45 - 150 A.D.

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This type is so rare that RPC is uncertain of the complete legends and questions if the standing god has his foot on a prow.

Baniyas (ancient Balaneais, Balanaea or Balanea, also called Leucas or Leucas-Claudia) is in northwestern Syria, 55 km south of Latakia (ancient Laodicea) and 35 km north of Tartous (ancient Tortosa). It was founded as a colony of Aradus. In Phoenician and Hellenistic times, it was an important seaport. On a nearby hill stands the Crusader castle of Margat (Qalaat el-Marqab), a huge Knights Hospitaller fortress built with black basalt stone.
RY86403. Brass AE 17, RPC I 4465A (2 specimens); de Saulcy 21, 3, VF, some flatness of high points, porosity, slightly off center on a tight flan; the best of the three specimens known to Forum, weight 4.142 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 45o, Leucas-Claudia (Baniyas, Syria) mint, c. 45 - 150 A.D.; obverse TWN KAI KΛAY∆IAIWN, male god standing facing, wearing tiara, long scepter vertical in right hand, left foot on small prow; reverse ΛYKA∆IWN, upper part of river god Chrysoroas swimming right; extremely rare; $430.00 (365.50)


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63290. Silver diobol, BMC Arabia p. 227, 11; cf. Tyler-Smith, type 2, 220 -221 (obol); Alram IP 622 (obol); Sunrise 650 (obol), VF, obverse rough, tight flan, weight 1.018 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 45o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, End of 1st Century A.D.; obverse bearded, draped bust left, wearing turreted crown and diadem, bushy hair; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; $45.00 (38.25)


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63296. Silver hemidrachm, Tyler Smith, type 1, 210 ff. var.; BMC Arabia, 238, 18 var.; Sunrise 646 var.; Alram IP 619 var. (none with 3 rows of pellets), gVF, toned, tight flan, light deposits, weight 1.285 g, maximum diameter 12.7 mm, die axis 90o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem with two-loop tie and Parthian-style tiara with three rows of pellets enclosing pellet above crescent; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; rare variety; $100.00 (85.00)


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63324. Silver diobol, BMC Arabia p. 227, 11; cf. Tyler-Smith, type 2, 220 - 221 (obol); Alram IP 622 (obol); Sunrise 650 (obol), VF, toned, well centered, die wear, weight 0.740 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, End of 1st Century A.D.; obverse bearded, draped bust left, wearing turreted crown and diadem, hair with three rows of curls; reverse diadem, formally presented with two ties laid across center; $65.00 (55.25)


Kingdom of Persis, Darios (Darev) II, 1st Century B.C.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65701. Silver hemidrachm, Tyler-Smith, type 1c, 17; BMC Arabia p. 218, 16; Sunrise 591 var. (2 rows of pellets); Alram IP 565 var. (same), VF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 2.084 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem and Parthian-style tiara with three rows of pellets surrounding crescent; reverse Aramaic legend: King Darev, king on right, standing left, holding scepter, facing altar on left; $75.00 (63.75)


Kingdom of Persis, Darios (Darev) II, 1st Century B.C.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65702. Silver hemidrachm, Tyler-Smith, type 1a, 5 - 8; Alram IP 565 var. (two rows of pellets); Sunrise 591 var. (same); BMC Arabia p. 218, 16 var. (same), VF, toned, oval flan, weight 1.884 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 315o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem and Parthian-style tiara with one row of pellets surrounding crescent, pellet border; reverse Aramaic legend: King Darev, king on right, standing left, holding scepter, facing altar on left; $65.00 (55.25)











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Ancient Greek Coins