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Ancient Greek Coins of All Periods

This shop category includes ancient Greek coins of all periods. To narrow your selection to a particular region, city or period, use the menus at the top of the page or on the left. Please note that all terms and phrases in blue text are links to a definition or more information.


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA73283. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 167; RIC V, part 2, 141 (R); SRCV IV 13665; Cohen VII 241; Hunter IV 50 var. (scepter transverse), gVF/VF, green patina, traces of silvering, nice portrait, some legend unstruck, black deposits, light scratches and marks, weight 5.021 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, S - P flanking across field, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $150.00 (€133.50)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The quantity of PAX coinage issued by Carausius probably exceeded the entire output of all his other types combined. The type was an appeal by the usurper Carausius for peace with the "official" emperors. Diocletian and Maximian did not recognize Carausius as emperor, nor did they reciprocate his desire for peace.
RA73500. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 167; RIC V, part 2, 141 (R); SRCV IV 13665; Cohen VII 241; Hunter IV 50 var. (scepter transverse), VF, attractive green patina with earthen highlighting, light marks, weight 2.846 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 45o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, S - P flanking across field, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $220.00 (€195.80)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The quantity of PAX coinage issued by Carausius probably exceeded the entire output of all his other types combined. The type was an appeal by the usurper Carausius for peace with the "official" emperors. Diocletian and Maximian did not recognize Carausius as emperor, nor did they reciprocate his desire for peace.
RA73504. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 171; RIC V, part 2, 143 (R); Cohen VII 239; SRCV IV 13665; Hunter IV 50, VF, excellent centering, green patina, traces of silvering, scratches, marks, light corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 3.599 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, olive branch in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, S - P flanking across field, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $225.00 (€200.25)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate Colchester

RA73506. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 397; RIC V, part 2, 339 (S); Cohen VII 238; Hunter IV 143 var. (obv. leg); SRCV IV 13666 var. (same, also scepter vertical), aVF, green patina with some flaking, edge crack, light marks and corrosion, weight 2.563 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive-branch in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, S - P flanking across field, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very scarce; $180.00 (€160.20)


Lokris Opuntia, Lokris, Greece, c. 340 - 330 B.C.

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Lokrian Ajax (the Lesser) was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. Locrians are mentioned by Homer in the Iliad as following Ajax, the son of O๏leus, to the Trojan War in forty ships, and as inhabiting the towns of Kynos, Opus, Calliarus, Besa, Scarphe, Augeiae, Tarphe, and Thronium. Lokrian Ajax was called the "lesser" or "Lokrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He is also mentioned in the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.
GS83462. Silver triobol, BCD Lokris 98; BMC Central p. 2, 9; SNG Cop 50; SNG Lockett 1700; de Luynes 1958; Pozzi 1339; SGCV I 2330; HGC 4 997, aVF, attractive style, tight flan, etched surfaces, weight 2.385 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lokris Opuntia mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse head of Persephone right, wearing wreath of grain, single-pendant earring, and pearl necklace; reverse OΠONTIΩN, Ajax son of Oileus, advancing right in fighting attitude, nude but for crested Corinthian helmet, short sword in right hand, shield on left arm ornamented inside with coiled snake (control symbol), kantharos (control symbol) below; scarce; $270.00 (€240.30)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

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Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS84176. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4059; SNG Milan 167; Dewing 3102; BMC Thrace -; Weber -; SNG Cop -; SNG Dreer -; SNG Lockett -; SNG Berry -, VF, attractive style, obverse off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.312 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in each of the two sunk quarters, H on raised quarter; scarce; $140.00 (€124.60)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

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Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS74811. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4060, SNG von Post 76, Weber -, Dewing -, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Lockett -, SNG Berry -, SNG Dreer -, F, obverse off-center, weight 1.871 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, AΓ monogram beside pellet in one sunk quadrant, pellet alone in the opposite sunk quadrant; rare variety; $38.00 (€33.82)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

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Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS74818. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4104, Demeester 36, BMC Thrace -, Weber -, Dewing -, SNG Cop -, SNG Dreer -, SNG Berry -, SNG Lockett -, SNG Milan -, SNG von Post -, F, toned, tight flan, tiny test cut on edge, weight 2.366 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet over H in one sunk quadrant, bucranium in the opposite sunk quadrant; very rare; $50.00 (€44.50)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

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Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS74709. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Thrace p. 184, 19; Weber 2435; McClean -; SNG Lockett -; SNG Cop -; SNG Berry -; SNG Dreer -; SNG Milan -, F, struck with worn obverse die, porosity, edge splits, tiny edge test cuts, weight 2.346 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, scallop shell and A over pellet in the sunk opposite quadrants; $38.00 (€33.82)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS75394. Silver hemidrachm, CNG e-auction 104, lot 37; otherwise apparently unpublished; perhaps an ancient plated counterfeit with a debased core, F, lamination defects, corrosion, scratches, weight 2.025 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, Cherronesos (or counterfeiter's) mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, selinon (or grape?) leaf on a stem in on of the sunk quadrants, a pellet in the opposite sunk quadrant; only the 2nd example of this type known to Forum; $50.00 (€44.50)











Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 22, 2017.
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Ancient Greek Coins