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Greek Imperial (Roman Provincial) Coins

Caracalla and Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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The brothers, Caracalla and Geta, pledged to their dying father, Septimius Severus, they would rule together. But each had a rival faction and vied for supremacy. Pretending reconciliation, Caracalla scheduled a meeting at their mother's house where instead Geta was murdered, dying in his mother's arms.
RP85633. Bronze pentassarion, H-J Marcianopolis 6.20.36.2 (R5), Varbanov I 1083 (R3) var. (rev. legend ends ΩN), SNG Cop -, SNG Mnchen -, BMC Thrace -, AMNG -, Moushmov -, VF, choice obverse with attractive busts, nice green patina, reverse slightly off center, area of porosity, weight 11.726 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 30o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Flavius Ulpianus, 210 - 211 A.D.; obverse AY K M AV ANTΩNINOC AY K Π CEΠ, ΓETAC (ending below busts), confronted busts of Caracalla, laureate, draped and cuirassed, and Geta, laureate and draped; reverse Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩ, Fortuna standing facing, head left, kalathos on head, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, E (mark of value) in field left; scarce; $150.00 (127.50)


Sidon, Phoenicia, 77 - 78 A.D.

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Sidon, named for the "first-born" of Canaan, the grandson of Noah (Genesis 10:15, 19), is frequently referred to by the prophets (Isaiah 23:2, 4, 12; Jeremiah 25:22; 27:3; 47:4; Ezekiel 27:8; 28:21, 22; 32:30; Joel 3:4). The Sidonians long oppressed Israel (Judges 10:12) but Solomon entered into a matrimonial alliance with them, and thus their form of idolatrous worship found a place in the land of Israel (1 Kings 11:1, 33). Jesus visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) where many came to hear him preach (Mark 3:8; Luke 6:17). After leaving Caesarea, Paul's ship put in at Sidon, before finally sailing for Rome (Acts 27:3, 4).
GB85631. Bronze AE 15, RPC II 2055; Rouvier 1354; BMC Phoenicia p.172, 179 ff.; SNG Cop 242, F, tight flan, some corrosion, weight 3.175 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, reign of Vespasian, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche right, star within crescent with horns up before; reverse war galley left, date HΠP (year 188) / ΣI∆WNOΣ / ΘEAΣ above, Bς below; $70.00 (59.50)


C. Asinius Gallus, Proconsul of Asia, 6 - 5 B.C., Temnos, Aeolis

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The larger denomination of the same series honored Augustus. On this coin Gallus gives himself the epithet Aγνος, meaning pure or holy! Later he was an ambitious and powerful senator. A foe of Tiberius, in 11 B.C. he married Tiberius' ex-wife, Vipsania. He was suspected of and never denied fathering Tiberius' son, Drusus the Younger. After Vipsania died, he courted the widow of Germanicus, Agrippina. In 30 A.D., Tiberius had him imprisoned and for three years kept him in solitary confinement and on the very edge of starvation until he died. To add further insult he was discredited by damnatio memoriae.
RP85941. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2447; SNG Cop 276; SNG Munchen 627; BMC Troas p. 146, 25; SNGvA -, VF, dark green patina, centered on a tight flan cutting off much of legends, bumps and marks, earthen encrustations, weight 4.284 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Temnos mint, 5 B.C.; obverse ACINIOC ΓAΛΛOC AΓNOC, bare head of Asinius Gallus right; reverse APOΛΛAC ΦAINIOY TAMNITAN, head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; rare; $270.00 (229.50)


C. Asinius Gallus, Proconsul of Asia, 6 - 5 B.C., Temnos, Aeolis

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The larger denomination of the same series honored Augustus. On this coin Gallus gives himself the epithet Aγνος, meaning pure or holy! Later he was an ambitious and powerful senator. A foe of Tiberius, in 11 B.C. he married Tiberius' ex-wife, Vipsania. He was suspected of and never denied fathering Tiberius' son, Drusus the Younger. After Vipsania died, he courted the widow of Germanicus, Agrippina. In 30 A.D., Tiberius had him imprisoned and for three years kept him in solitary confinement and on the very edge of starvation until he died. To add further insult he was discredited by damnatio memoriae.
RP85944. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2447; SNG Cop 276; SNG Munchen 627; BMC Troas p. 146, 25; SNGvA -, VF, green patina, slightly off center on a broad flan, bumps and marks, areas of corrosion, light deposits, weight 3.514 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Temnos mint, 5 B.C.; obverse ACINIOC ΓAΛΛOC AΓNOC, bare head of Asinius Gallus right; reverse APOΛΛAC ΦAINIOY TAMNITAN, head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; rare; $250.00 (212.50)


Neopaphos, Cyprus, c. 31 - 30 B.C.

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A very rare variant, probably struck after Actium 30 B.C., where the statue holds a Roman patera instead of the Ptolemaic grain ears. Representations of this statue on Roman coins show the same distinctive pose, with a patera. The statue has been uncovered by archaeologists in Salamis.
GP85835. Bronze hemiobol, Bank of Cyprus 69 var.; Paphos II 469 var.; Hosking 68 var.; Cox Curium 128 var.; Michaelidou 35 var.; Svoronos -; Weiser -; SNG Cop -; RPC I -, F, edge crack, weight 1.509 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 0o, Neopaphos mint, c. 31 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, patera (instead of stalks of grain) in right, long scepter in left hand, star above; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; very rare variety; $150.00 (127.50)


Ephesos, Ionia, 48 - 27 B.C.

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The torch, bee and stag were attributes of Artemis/Diana and civic symbols of Ephesus.
GB85855. Bronze AE 24, BMC Ionia p. 69, 180; SGCV II 4413; SNG Cop 338 var. (M above); Lindgren-Kovacs 456 var. (same); SNGvA 1871 var. (Θ above), aVF, green patina, bumps and marks, earthen deposits, patina flaking at edge, weight 6.864 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, 48 - 27 B.C.; obverse diademed and drapes bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver at her shoulder; reverse forepart of stag right, looking back, flaming long torch behind, E-Φ flanking stag's neck, MHNOΦI/ΛOC below; $80.00 (68.00)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In ancient times, Alexandria was one of the world's most famous cities, known for its lighthouse (Pharos, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) and its library (the largest in the ancient world). Founded around 331 B.C. by Alexander the Great, it was Egypt's capital for nearly a thousand years, until the Muslim conquest of Egypt in 641 A.D.
RP85906. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 204, Geissen 172, Milne 238, Kampmann-Ganschow 14.88, BMC Alexandria 163, RPC I 5289, SRCV I 2004, Emmett 109, VF, toned, flan flaw on each side, areas of corrosion, weight 11.750 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 65 - 28 Aug 66 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP AY, radiate bust right wearing aegis; reverse AYTOKPA, draped bust of Alexandria right wearing elephant-skin headdress, LIB (year 12) right; $100.00 (85.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Canata, Decapolis

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Catana, Qanawat Syria today, is probably the city called Kenath in the Bible (Numbers 32:42, 1 Chronicles 2:23). The Hellenistic-Roman city of Kanatha, is mentioned for the first time in the reign of Herod the Great, when Nabataean forces defeated a Jewish army. It remained an issue of contention between the two powers. From Pompey's time until Trajan's, it was a city of the Decapolis, a loose federation of cities allowed by the Romans to enjoy a degree of autonomy. Under Trajan, it was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Septimius Severus refounded it as the Roman colony Septimia Canatha and transferred it to the province of Arabia.
GB85805. Bronze AE 13, RPC II 2092; Spijkerman 4; Rosenberger 3; SNG ANS 1259; BMC Galatia p. 302, 2; SGICV 877, aVF, tight flan, earthen deposits, weight 2.162 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 0o, Canata (Qanawat, Syria) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse ∆OMITI KAIΣAP, laureate head left; reverse towered and draped bust of Tyche left, hair in chignon, KANATA downward behind, ZNP (year 157 of Pompeian era) upward on left; ex Tom Cederlind with his tag; rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP85967. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf Cappadocia 17; Sydenham Caesarea 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, aVF, toned, bumps and scratches, weight 1.539 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike advancing right, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left; $85.00 (72.25)


Tetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Ptolemaios, 85 - 40 B.C., Cleopatra Countermark

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When Aristobulus II was murdered by Pompey's party in Judaea (49 B.C.), his sons and daughters found protection with Ptolemaios (Ant. xiv. 7, 4; B. J. i. 9, 2). It may be that the national Jewish party at that time depended for support on the Itureans in Chalcis, and perhaps the following statement has reference to that fact: "On the 17th of Adar danger threatened the rest of the Soferim in the city of Chalcis, and it was salvation for Israel" (Meg. Ta'an. xii.).
CM85831. Bronze AE 19, Herman 7.c (same inscription var. & countermark); HGC 9 1441 (S) var. (inscription); BMC Galatia p. 279, 2 var. (same); Lindgren III 2130 var. (same), VF, centered on a tight flan; c/m: VF, weight 6.715 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chalkis sub Libano mint, 85 - 40 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; countermark: bust of Cleopatra VII right in oval punch; reverse eagle flying right, NE monogram between wing and tail, ΠTOΛEMAIO / TETPAPXH / AXP (AX ligate) in three lines below; ex Sayles & Lavender; scarce; $180.00 (153.00)











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Greek Imperial Coins