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Greek Imperial (Roman Provincial) Coins

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Cyrene, Cyrenaica

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In 74 B.C., Cyrene was made a Roman province. Previously under the Ptolemies the Jewish inhabitants had enjoyed equal rights. Under, Rome they were increasingly oppressed by the now autonomous and much larger Greek population. Tensions came to a head in the insurrection of the Jews of Cyrene under Vespasian in 73 A.D. and especially during Kitos War, under Trajan, in 117. The later revolt was quelled by Marcius Turbo, but not before huge numbers of civilians had been brutally massacred by the Jewish rebels. According to Eusebius of Caesarea, the Jewish rebellion left Libya so depopulated that a few years later Hadrian had to establish new colonies there just to maintain the viability of the settlement.
RP86686. Silver hemidrachm, RPC III 3 (76 spec.); SNG Cop 203 (Caesarea); Sydenham Caesarea 178 (Caesarea), BMC Galatia p. 53, 56 (Caesarea), gVF, attractive style, toned, minor porosity, light bumps and marks, light encrustations, weight 1.618 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 195o, Kyrene (near Shahhat, Libya) mint, 100 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIς NEP TPAIAN ΣEB ΓEPM, laureate head right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠAT Γ (Consul for the 3rd time), head of Zeus-Ammon right, bearded and horned; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group, auction 73 (13 Sep 2006), lot 762; very rare; $320.00 SALE PRICE $288.00

Korykos, Cilicia, 1st Century B.C.

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Korykos (Corycus) was the port for Seleucia, an important harbor and commercial town. The Romans defeated the fleet of Antiochus the Great near Korykos, in 191 B.C. In Roman imperial times emperors usually kept a fleet there to watch over the pirates.

Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
RP87151. Bronze AE 18, SNG Levante 798 (same dies); Imhoof-Blumer KM II p. 462, 1; SNG BnF 1099 var. (magistrate); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Lycaonia -, F, dark patina, scrapes, scratches, pitting, weight 3.110 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Korykos (Kizkalesi, Turkey) mint, Roman rule, 1st century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder, Σ below chin; reverse Apollo standing left, holding laurel branch in extended right hand, leaning with left elbow on column, YB upper left (unstruck?), ME lower left, KΩPYKIΩTΩN downward on right; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Apamea, Phrygia

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While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
RP87110. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 212 corr. (KAI CEB, same dies); BMC Phrygia p. 96, 155 & pl. XI, 10 (same rev. die); Weber 7036; RPC III 2586; SNGvA 3492; SNG Mün 155, gVF, tight flan, rough etched porous surfaces, weight 3.927 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, obverse A∆PIANOC KAIC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right, with aegis; reverse AΠAMEΩN MAPCYAC KIBΩTOI, Marsyas, naked but for chlamys over lower limbs, reclining left in rocky cave, above which are two or five chests, holding cornucopia in his raised right hand, double flute in left hand; beneath him, inverted vase from which water flows; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00

Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Antioch ad Maeandrum, Caria

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Antiochia on the Maeander (earlier named Pythopolis) was a city of ancient Caria, in Anatolia, located between the Maeander and Orsinus rivers near their confluence. It was the site of a bridge over the Maeander. The scanty ruins are located on a hill (named, in Turkish, Yeniser) a few km southeast of Kuyucak, Aydin Province, Turkey, near the modern city of Basaran. The city already existed when Antiochus I enlarged and renamed it. It was home to the sophist Diotrephes. It has not been excavated, although Christopher Ratte and others visited the site in 1994 and produced a sketch plan.
RP87111. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2836, SNG BnF 144, SNG Fitzwilliam 4672, BMC Caria –, SNGvA –, SNG Cop –, VF, tight flan, earthen deposits, green patina with some flaking, marks, light corrosion, weight 4.570 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Antiochia ad Maeandrum mint, obverse TIBEPIOΣ KΛAY∆IOΣ ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse MYΩNOΣ ΣYNAPXIA ANTIOXEΩN, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond vertical before her; very rare; $240.00 SALE PRICE $216.00

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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An excellent gift for a veterinarian! The 18th-century French numismatist Belley, cited in BMC Mysia p. 105, suggested that the SVB in the reverse legend should be expanded to "subvenienti," giving the meaning "To Aesculapius, the god who helps." This extraordinary depiction of Aesculapius is the only ancient coin reverse type referring to veterinary medicine.
RP87143. Bronze AE 22, RPC Online VI temp 3871 (unpublished in refs, 4 spec. listed from auctions); SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, SNG BnF -, SNG Çanakkale -, BMC Mysia -, VF, porosity, light corrosion, edge flaw, weight 4.773 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 45o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP CAEƧ L ƧEP ƧEV ALEXANDER, laureate and cuirassed bust, right from the front, wearing cuirass with Gorgoneion; reverse DEO AE ƧVB (Deo Aesculapius subvenienti - to Aesculapius, the god who helps), Asclepius seated right on throne, treating an injured bull standing left before him, with his right hand holding the bull's raised right foreleg, C G H I P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 39 (26 Aug 2017), lot 470; rare; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00

Agrippina Junior, Augusta 50 - March 59 A.D., Philadelphia, Lydia

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Philadelphia was an important and wealthy trade center in ancient Lydia that retained its importance until late Byzantine times. In 17 A.D., the city suffered greatly in an earthquake. After Tiberius aided in rebuilding, it took the new name of Neocaesarea. Under Vespasian, it was titled Flavia. Saint Paul and Saint John the Theologian, visited, and established the first Christian churches. St. Ignatius of Antioch visited on his trip to his martyrdom in Rome. Philadelphia is among the Seven Churches named in John's Book of Revelation. But in the 6th century, paganism still held on in the face of a Christianizing Empire, and the city became known as "little Athens" for its dedication to deities. Today the modern city is called Alasehir.
RP87144. Bronze AE 15, RPC I 3042; BMC Lydia p. 196, 59; SNG Cop 375; SNGvA -, VF, dark green patina, reverse off center, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Philadelphia (Alasehir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Ti. Neikanor, c. 54 - 59 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠΠINA ΣEBAΣTH, draped bust right, hair in long plait down back of neck and looped at end, long loosely curled lock down side of neck; reverse cornucopia overflowing with fruit and grain, ΦIΛA−∆EΛΦE/ΩN N−EIKA/NΩ−P across field in three divided lines; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 39 (26 Aug 2017), lot 410 ; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00

Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Mt. Erciyes (Argaeus to the Romans) a massive stratovolcano located 25 km south of Kayseri, Turkey, is the highest mountain in central Anatolia (3,916 meters,12,848 ft). It may have last erupted in 253 B.C. Strabo wrote that the summit was never free from snow and those few who ascended it reported seeing both the Black Sea to the north and the Mediterranean to the south on clear days.
RS87145. Silver didrachm, BMC Galatia p. 66, 172; RPC Online IV 7019; Metcalf Cappadocia 130a; Sydenham Cappadocia 327; SNG Righetti 1777; SNG Cop 242 corr. (laur.), VF, well centered, light toning, porous, tiny edge cracks, light scratches, part of obverse legend weak, weight 6.628 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 161 - 166 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP ANTWNEINOC CEB, bare head right; reverse YΠA−TOC•Γ, Mount Argaeus surmounted by star, trees on slopes; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 39 (26 Aug 2017), lot 444; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00

Gaius Asinius Gallus, Roman Proconsul of Asia, 6 - 5 B.C., Temnos, Aeolis

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The larger denomination of the same series honored Augustus. On this coin Gallus gives himself the epithet Aγνος, meaning pure or holy! Later he was an ambitious and powerful senator. A foe of Tiberius, in 11 B.C. he married Tiberius' ex-wife, Vipsania. He was suspected of and never denied fathering Tiberius' son, Drusus the Younger. After Vipsania died, he courted the widow of Germanicus, Agrippina. In 30 A.D., Tiberius had him imprisoned and for three years kept him in solitary confinement and on the very edge of starvation until he died. To add further insult he was discredited by damnatio memoriae.
GB87100. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2447 (23 spec.); SNG Cop 276; SNG München 627; BMC Troas p. 146, 24; CRE Ashmolean 1261; Waddington 1350; SNGvA -, gF, slightly off center, scratches, earthen deposits, weight 2.835 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Temnos (Menemen?, Izmir, Turkey) mint, 5 B.C.; obverse ACINIOC ΓAΛΛOC AΓNOC, bare head of Asinius Gallus right; reverse APOΛΛAC ΦAINIOY TAMNITAN, head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; scarce; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Parion, Mysia

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Plotina was Trajan's wife, married to him before he became emperor. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. Marciana was Trajan's eldest sister and the mother of Matidia. She was an accomplished woman who lost her husband before her brother's succession. Matidia lived as a widow with Plotina and they were united by the tenderest and most uninterrupted friendship. Both were awarded the title Augusta at the same time in 105. Marciana died c. 112 - 114. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
RP87105. Bronze AE 19, RPC III 1543 (17 spec.), SNG BnF 1468, Weber 5151; countermark: Howgego 304 (11 or 17 of this type in RIC have this countermark), VF, rough and porous, off center, area on reverse flattened by counter marking, area of corrosion on reverse, weight 2.772 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 105- 114 A.D.; obverse TRAIAN AVG, laureate bust right slight drapery on far shoulder; countermark: capricorn right in an oval punch; reverse MARCIANA ET PLOTINA AVG, confronting draped busts of Plotina and Marciana; rare; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00

Germanicus, Caesar, died 10 October 19 A.D., Apamea, Phrygia

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Apamea is mentioned in the Talmud (Ber. 62a, Niddah, 30b and Yeb. 115b). Christianity was very likely established early in the city. Saint Paul probably visited the place when he went throughout Phrygia.
RP87109. Leaded bronze AE 15, RPC I 3134 (8 spec.); SNGvA 3488; Waddington 5705; Imhoof-Blumer KM p. 210, 16; SNG Cop -; BMC Phrygia -, VF, nice portrait, bumps, scratches, encrustations, weight 2.886 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 0o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, magistrate Gaius Ioulios Kallikles, 14 - 19 A.D.; obverse ΓEPMANIKOΣ KAIΣAP, bare head right; reverse IOYΛIOΣ KAΛΛIKΛHΣ AΠAMEΩN, Stag standing right on maeander pattern; rare; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00

Catalog current as of Saturday, March 24, 2018.
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Greek Imperial Coins