Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Dec 13, 2017

Dec 12, 2017

Dec 11, 2017

Dec 07, 2017

Dec 06, 2017

Dec 05, 2017

Dec 04, 2017

Dec 01, 2017

Nov 30, 2017

Nov 28, 2017

Nov 27, 2017

Nov 26, 2017

Nov 25, 2017

Nov 24, 2017
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Secessionist Empires ▸ Tetricus IIView Options:  |  |  | 

Gallic Empire, Tetricus II, Spring 274 A.D.

Tetricus II's father succeeded to the throne of the Gallic empire after the death of Victorinus and made him Caesar in 273 and Augustus in spring 274 A.D. After three years of rule, the power of the separatist state had declined and in 273 A.D. Aurelian invaded. Tetricus I abdicated rather than fight the vastly superior forces of Aurelian. Tetricus II and his father were both honored by Aurelian and they lived quite comfortably in Rome. Rome in 271 A.D.


Gallic Empire, Tetricus II, Spring 274 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, and raising a fold of her dress with her left hand. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men.
RA85617. Billon antoninianus, RIC V 270, Schulzki AGK 9a, Cunetio 2647, Elmer 791, Cohen VI 88, Hunter IV 11, SRCV III 11292, aVF, interesting multi-color patina, edge cracks, weight 3.243 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Mainz or Treveri (Trier) mint, as caesar, 273 - spring 274 A.D.; obverse C PIV ESV TETRICVS CAES, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse SPES AVGG (hope of the two emperors), Spes advancing left, extending flower in right hand, raising skirt drapery with left hand; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS41903. Billon antoninianus, RIC V 224, Schulzki AGK 1, Cunetio 2612, Cohen VI 5, Elmer -, SRCV III -, VF, nice portrait, weight 2.274 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, as caesar, 273 - spring 274 A.D.; obverse C PIV ESV TETRICVS CAES, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COMES AVG (companion of the Emperor), Victory standing left, wreath in extended right hand, palm over shoulder in left hand; scarce; SOLD


Gallic Empire, Tetricus II, as Caesar, 273 - Spring 274 A.D., Barbaric imitative

Click for a larger photo
From the Aiello Collection.
RB04071. Bronze barbarous radiate, EF, weight 2.02 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 180o, irregular barbaric mint, after 273 A.D.; obverse C PIV ESV CETV PEV, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse AV [ ] SVC, female figure standing left holding cornucopia in left and uncertain object in right; SOLD










OBVERSE LEGENDS

CPETETRICVSCAES
CPETETRICVSCES
CPESTETRICVSCAES
CPESVTETRICVSCAES
CPESVTETRICVSCAES
CPTETRICVSCAE
CPTETRICVSCAECES
CPTETRICVSCAESCES
CPIESTETRICVSCAE
CPIVESVTETRICVSCAES
CPIVTETRICVSA
CPIVTETRICVSPAVG
CPVTETRICVSCAES
CPVESVTETRICVSCAES
PIVESVTETRICVSAVGG
PIVESVTETRICVSCAES


REFERENCES

Besly, E. & R. Bland. The Cunetio Treasure: Roman Coinage of the Third Century AD. (London, 1983).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 6: Macrianus to Diocletian & Maximianus. (Paris, 1886).
Elmer, G. "Die Münzprägung der gallischen Kaiser von Postumus bis Tetricus in Köln, Trier und Mailand" in Bonner Jahrbücher 146 (1941). pp. 1 -106.
Mairat, J. Le monnayage de l'Empire Gaulois. CGB Rome XV. (Fixed Price List, 2004).
Mattingly, H., E.A. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, Part II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Schulte, B. Die Goldprägung der gallischen Kaiser von Postumus bis Tetricus. Typos IV. (Aarau, 1983).
Schulzki, H. J. Die Antoninianprägung der Gallischen Kaiser von Postumus bis Tetricus. (Bonn, 1996).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Zschucke, C.-F. Die Bronze-Teilstück-Prägungen der römischen Münzstätte Trier. (Trier, 2002).
Zschucke, C.-F. Die römische Münzstätte Köln. (Trier, 1993).

Catalog current as of Thursday, December 14, 2017.
Page created in 1.155 seconds.
Roman Coins of Tetricus II