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Roman Coins of the Recovery of the Empire

Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA84506. Billon antoninianus, Venèra IV 55 - 60; RIC V, part 2, 394; Hunter 33; Bastien Lyon 539; Cohen VI 43; Pink VI/2 p. 24; SRCV III 12249 var. (obv. leg., bust), Choice VF/F, excellent portrait, traces of silvering, porosity, reverse die wear, flan crack, weight 3.865 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 6th emission, August 283 - early 284 A.D.; obverse IMP C NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder, from the front; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse long scepter in left hand, B left; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $120.00 (€106.80)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RL84026. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 816; SRCV III 12071 var. (...P F AVG); Cohen VI 894; Hunter IV -, EF, full silvering, full circles centering, some flatly struck areas, weight 3.888 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, emmision 5, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), Mars walking right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, transverse spear upward right in right hand, trophy of captured arms over left shoulder in left hand, XXIV in exergue; $125.00 (€111.25)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280 A.D., the Germans destroyed the Roman fleet on the Rhine. Bonosus was proclaimed emperor at Colonia Agrippina (Cologne). After Probus defeated him, Bonosus hanged himself. His family was treated with honors.
RA84373. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 907; Pink VI/1 p. 43; Hunter IV 323 var. (5th officina); SRCV III 11968 var. (...PROBVS AVG); Cohen VI 173 var. (same), Choice VF, well centered, near full silvering, weight 2.557 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, emission 3, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Victory on left, standing right, palm in left hand, with right hand presenting wreath to emperor, on right, standing left, holding spear in left hand, P low center, XXIMC in exergue; $120.00 (€106.80)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, E, PXXI

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Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click "EQVITI" to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "E" in the reverse field is the first letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "P" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the first officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA83456. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 480; Pink VI/1 p. 67; Cohen VI 121; SRCV III 11965 var., Choice VF, full circles strike, traces of silvering, weight 4.463 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, emission 9, 281 A.D.; obverse IMP C PROBVS AVG, radiate and mantled bust left, holding an eagle-tipped scepter; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Concordia standing slightly, head left, flanked by two standards, one in each hand, E left, PXXI in exergue; $100.00 (€89.00)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to Minerva the companion of Probus. Minerva was the Roman virgin goddess of wisdom, trade, medicine, arts, and magic. From the 2nd century B.C., the Romans equated her with the Greek goddess Athena and often depicted her with her sacred owl. Minerva was born from the head of Jupiter. After impregnating the Titaness Metis, Jupiter recalled a prophecy that his own child would overthrow him. Fearing their child would rule the Heavens in his place, Jupiter swallowed Metis whole. The Titaness forged weapons and armor for her child while within the father-god, and the constant pounding and ringing gave him a headache. To relieve the pain, Vulcan used a hammer to split Jupiter's head. From the cleft, Minerva emerged, whole, adult, and bearing her mother's weapons and armor.
RA83487. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 69; Bastien IX 315; Hunter IV 83; Cohen VI 106; SRCV III 11963; Pink VI-1 p. 70, VF, nice green patina, traces of silvering, some light scratches, weight 4.018 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 281 A.D.; obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse COMITI PROBI AVG (to the companion of Emperor Probus), Minerva standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, spear and shield at feet in left hand, I (officina number) in exergue; $90.00 (€80.10)


Carinus, First Half of 283 - Spring 285 A.D.

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A sum of Greek numerals E (5) and ∆ (4) is used to indicate the 9th officina in order to avoid using Θ (9). Because they sound alike, theta (Θ) was associated with Thanatos, the daemon personification of death. Theta used as a warning symbol of death, in the same way that skull and crossbones are used in modern times. It survives on potsherds used by Athenians voting for the death penalty. Also, after a funeral "Nine Days of Sorrow," were solemnly observed by the family. Romans avoided the use of theta, as we avoid the use of the number 13 today.
RL84211. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 325; Cohen VI 184; SRCV III 12362; Pink VI/2, p. 52; Hunter IV -, gVF, much silvering, well centered and struck on a tight flan, weight 3.684 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, 9th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 4th emission, May - June 284 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR CARINVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Emperor standing right, short scepter in left hand, facing Jupiter (or Numerian) on right, standing left, with right hand offering Victory on globe, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, E∆ in lower center, XXI in exergue; $110.00 (€97.90)


Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch

RA84360. Billon antoninianus, RIC V 378 (S), Cohen VI 115, Hunter IV 14 var. (9th officina), cf. SRCV III 12256 (...P F NOB C), aF, well centered, rough, encrustation, weight 3.752 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D; obverse IMP C M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVGGG (valor of the three emperors), emperor standing right, holding scepter, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, * above, Γ in center, XXI in exergue; scarce; $28.00 (€24.92)


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In 273, Aurelian increased Rome's daily bread ration to nearly 1.5 pounds and added pig fat to the list of foods distributed free to the populace.
RX84118. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 5489, Geissen 3083, Milne 4426, Curtis 1781, SNG Milan 1977, SNG Cop 879, SNG Hunter 4781, BMC Alexandria 2360, Kampmann 106.40, Emmett 3924, gVF, nice brown chocolate surfaces, well centered on a tight flan, weight 7.685 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 273 - 28 Aug 274 A.D.; obverse A K Λ ∆OM AYPHΛIANOC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse eagle standing slightly left, head turned back right, tail right, wings open, wreath in beak, ETOVC E (year 5) upward on left; $70.00 (€62.30)


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA84409. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1060, RIC V 225, Cohen VI 316, Huvelin 1990 23, Komin 1281, Trésor de Syrie 1969 77, aVF, gray metal, grainy surfaces, weight 3.259 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 3, c. early - mid 270; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Minerva standing right, wearing crested helmet, vertical spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, no control or mintmark; $36.00 (€32.04)


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess of good luck and success. She was a prominent symbol of wealth and prosperity and, during the Empire, she played an important role in Rome's state religion. Since it was considered the duty of the emperor to promote public happiness, almost every emperor struck coins dedicated to Felicitas.
RA84377. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3443, RIC V 140, Hunter IV 48, Venèra 1880 - 1923, BnF XII 1700, Thibouville 2298, Gloucester 736, Maravielle 796, VF, well centered on a broad flan, some porosity, weight 3.880 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, issue 2, early - Jun 276; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse FELICIT TEMP (happy times), Felicitas standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, V in exergue; $70.00 (€62.30)











Catalog current as of Sunday, April 30, 2017.
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Recovery of the Empire