Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

May 25, 2018

May 24, 2018

May 23, 2018

May 22, 2018

May 21, 2018

May 18, 2018

May 17, 2018

May 16, 2018

May 15, 2018

May 14, 2018

May 11, 2018

May 10, 2018

May 09, 2018

May 08, 2018
Medieval & Modern Coins
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & MoesiaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins from Thrace and Moesia

Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Tomis, Moesia Inferior

Click for a larger photo
Although Varbanov does not list this coin as rare, RPC lists only two specimens and Coin Archives lists only one sale of the type in the last two decades.

Tomis (Constanta, Romania today) was founded by Greek colonists around 600 B.C. on the Black Sea shore for trade with the local Getic population. The Roman poet Ovid was banished by Augustus to Tomis in 8 A.D. and died there eight years later. By his account, Tomis was "a town located in a war-stricken cultural wasteland on the remotest margins of the empire."
RP85844. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1825 (2 specimens), AMNG I/II 2577, Varbanov I 4631 (R7), Moushmov 1789, SGICV 382; BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Mnchen -, aF, very porous, edge crack, weight 3.757 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tomis (Constanta, Romania) mint, 16 Mar 37 - 24 Jan 41 A.D.; obverse ΓAIOC KAICAP (counterclockwise from upper left), laureate head right; reverse Dioscuri on horseback right, TOMITΩN HΓHTO in two lines below; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; very rare; $130.00 (110.50)


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS86502. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 842; BMC Thrace p. 183, 14 var. (wreath vice trilobe); SNG Ashmolean 3589 var. (same); McClean 4073 ff. var. (rosette vice trilobe), VF, toned, some bumps and marks, weight 2.299 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chersonesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding, fore-paws raised; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet (control symbol) in one sunken quarter, pellet within trilobe (flower?, control symbol) in the opposite sunken quarter; $180.00 (153.00)


Samothrace, Islands off Thrace, c. 280 - 200 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Samothrace was subjugated by Philip II, and was under Macedonian suzerainty when this coin was struck. In 168 B.C., after the battle of Pydna, Samothrace became independent. Vespasian absorbed the island into the Roman Empire in 70 A.D. The Book of Acts in the Christian Bible records that the Apostle Paul, on his second missionary journey outside of Palestine, sailed from Troas to Samothrace and spent one night.

This is the first coin of Samothrace ever handled by Forum.
GB86531. Bronze AE 16, CNT_ 7355, SNG Cop 1000, BMC Thrace p. 215, 2 - 10 var. (different magistrates); HGC 6 321, gVF, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 4.538 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Samothrace mint, magistrate Teisikas, c. 280 - 200 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Cybele seated left on throne without back, kalathos on head, phiale in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ΣA-MO downward on left, TEIΣIK (magistrate) downward on right; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $160.00 (136.00)


Orthagoreia, Thrace, c. 350 - 330 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
All the references given, except SNG Cop, include Orthagoreia in Macedonia. See Psoma Maroneia, pp. 193204, for the redesignation of Orthagoreia from Macedon to Thrace.
SH86789. Silver hemidrachm, SNG ANS 7.1 564 (same dies); SNG Cop 690; SNG Ashmolean V.2 2356; AMNG III-2, 3; BMC Macedonia p. 88, 5; HGC 3.1 600 (R1), Choice aEF, attractive style, well centered, nice toning, slight porosity, weight 2.571 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 15o, Orthagoreia mint, c. 350 - 330 B.C.; obverse facing head of Artemis, facing slightly left,, wearing triple-drop earring and pearl necklace, quiver on left shoulder; reverse OΠΘAΓO−ΠEΩN, facing ornate Macedonian helmet with cheek pieces, and star ornament crest; scarce; $700.00 (595.00)


Odrysian Kingdom of Thrace, Kotys IV, c. 171 - 167 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cotys IV was a king of the Odrysian kingdom of Thrace from c. 170 - 160 B.C., succeeding his father, Seuthes IV. He married Semestra and had a son, Dyegilos, who married Apama, daughter of Prusias II of Bithynia and wife Apama III. Their son Sothimus married Athenais, daughter of Attalus III, King of Pergamon and wife Berenice, and their son was Cotys I (Sapaean).
GB85630. Bronze AE 14, Peykov C6200, Topalov II 9, SNG Stancomb 299, HGC 3.2 1737 (Kotys II, 57-50/48 B.C., R2), gF, dark near black patina, porous, weight 2.520 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos or Bizye mint, c. 171 - 167 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust right; reverse eagle standing on thunderbolt left, head left, wings closed, BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, KOTYOΣ in exergue; rare; $125.00 (106.25)


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS86794. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Thrace p. 183, 10; McClean 4081; SNG Cop -, VF, well centered, light encrustations, some die wear, minor flan flaws on reverse, weight 2.021 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Chersonesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, palm frond in one sunken quarter, pellet in the opposite sunken quarter; $110.00 (93.50)


Thracians, Odrysian Kingdom, Kotys I 384 - 359 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Soon after he became king, Kotys allied with Athens and married his daughter to the Athenian general Iphicrates, who became his second in command. With the help of Iphicrates, Kotys expanded his kingdom, but his success led to increasing tensions with Athens. The Second Athenian Confederacy was founded as a safeguard against Kotys. In 365 B.C., Kotys went to war with the Athenians for the Thracian Chersonese. Around this time, Kotys' treasurer Miltokythes rebelled. Iphicrates and Kotys' mercenary commander Charidemus bribed the Athenian commanders to help suppress the rebellion. In 361 B.C., Charidemus returned to Athens with a treaty from Kotys, proclaiming him an ally. By 360 B.C., Kotys controlled the whole Chersonese peninsula. Late Sep. 360 B.C., Kotys was murdered by two of Platos students, Python and Heraclides. Advisers to the King, they murdered him under the pretext that he had wronged their father. In Athens, they were proclaimed honorary citizens and rewarded with gold wreaths.

Kypsela, Thrace, was located in the region between the river Nestos to the river Hebros.
GS86792. Silver diobol, Winzer 31.3; SNG Ashmolean 3719; Topalov 96; Peter p. 114 var. (KO/T-Y and no ivy leaf), gVF, toned, light marks, slightly grainy/porous, weight .0793 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Kypsela mint, 384 - 359 B.C.; obverse bare head left, with beard and moustache; reverse two-handled vessel (Odrysian dynastic symbol?), KO above, ivy leaf right; very rare; $300.00 (255.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Byzantion Countermark

Click for a larger photo
This BY over prow countermark, along with a nearly identical countermark using an archaic form of B resembling Π, was used at Byzantium. David Sear notes, "at this time [when the counter mark was applied after c. 280 B.C.], the Byzantines were subject to continual threats by Gaulish invaders, who were bought off by the payment of huge annual tributes. The impoverished city had to resort to countermarking foreign coins in place of a proper currency."
CM85916. Silver drachm, c/m: Propontis Hoard 144, SGCV 1585 (Byzantion, 280 - 225 B.C.), coin: aF, flattened opposite countermark, marks, scratches, porosity; countermark VF, weight 3.808 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Western Ionian(?) mint, c. 323 - 297 B.C.; obverse Herakles head right wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; countermark: BY over prow left with dolphin finial within circular punch; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated left, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, control symbols left and below throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; rare countermark; $230.00 (195.50)


Istros, Thrace, c. 280 - 255 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse type has been variously interpreted as representing the Dioscuri, the rising and setting sun, and the two branches of the river Danube. - Greek Coins and Their Values by David Sear.
GS86906. Silver drachm, Dima subgroup VI, 1, pl. XIX, 2 (same obv. die); AMNG I/I 425; SNG Stancomb 148; SNG BM 256 var. (right head inverted); SNG Cop -; BMC Thrace -, VF, toned, flan flaws, flan cracks, weight 4.652 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 90o, Istros (near Istria, Romania) mint, c. 280 - 256/255 B.C.; obverse two facing male heads, left head inverted; reverse IΣTPIH, sea-eagle grasping a dolphin with talons, ΦY (control) below dolphin; $300.00 (255.00)


Celts, Hercuniates, Middle Danube, Imitative Philip II of Macedonia, "Kapostal" Type, c. 2nd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Hercuniates were a minor Celtic tribe located, by the middle of the first century B.C., in a narrow territory on the western side and close to the Danube a little west of modern Budapest. Their neighbors to the north were the Illyrian Azari and Dacian Carpi, to the east the Eravisci, to the south Illyrian tribes, and to the west a pocket of the Boii alongside the Taurisci. Pliny and Ptolemy refer to the Hercuniates as a civitas peregrina, a wandering tribe that had travelled to Pannonia from foreign parts, most probably following the Danube from the west, skirting the vast Hercynia silva, the forest from which they seem to have gained their name. Three Hercuniates' oppida sites have been identified, all in the Lake Balaton region. They issued their own coins by the second century B.C., but little else is known of them. They were subdued by Rome sometime between 20 B.C. and 40 A.D. Perhaps they peacefully allied with Rome but the events were not recorded.
CE79708. Billon tetradrachm, Gbl OTA 488/7, Lanz 780; imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, "Kapostal" type, aVF, corrosion, irregular flan, edge/reverse chip, weight 7.688 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd Century B.C.; obverse devolved laureate and bearded head of Zeus right, crescent of dots before face; reverse devolved rider left on horseback; $50.00 (42.50)











Catalog current as of Saturday, May 26, 2018.
Page created in 1.236 seconds.
Thrace & Moesia