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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & MoesiaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins from Thrace and Moesia

Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

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Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS84176. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4059; SNG Milan 167; Dewing 3102; BMC Thrace -; Weber -; SNG Cop -; SNG Dreer -; SNG Lockett -; SNG Berry -, VF, attractive style, obverse off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.312 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in each of the two sunk quarters, H on raised quarter; scarce; $140.00 (€124.60)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS74811. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4060, SNG von Post 76, Weber -, Dewing -, BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Lockett -, SNG Berry -, SNG Dreer -, F, obverse off-center, weight 1.871 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, AΓ monogram beside pellet in one sunk quadrant, pellet alone in the opposite sunk quadrant; rare variety; $38.00 (€33.82)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS74818. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4104, Demeester 36, BMC Thrace -, Weber -, Dewing -, SNG Cop -, SNG Dreer -, SNG Berry -, SNG Lockett -, SNG Milan -, SNG von Post -, F, toned, tight flan, tiny test cut on edge, weight 2.366 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet over H in one sunk quadrant, bucranium in the opposite sunk quadrant; very rare; $50.00 (€44.50)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS74709. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Thrace p. 184, 19; Weber 2435; McClean -; SNG Lockett -; SNG Cop -; SNG Berry -; SNG Dreer -; SNG Milan -, F, struck with worn obverse die, porosity, edge splits, tiny edge test cuts, weight 2.346 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, scallop shell and A over pellet in the sunk opposite quadrants; $38.00 (€33.82)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS75394. Silver hemidrachm, CNG e-auction 104, lot 37; otherwise apparently unpublished; perhaps an ancient plated counterfeit with a debased core, F, lamination defects, corrosion, scratches, weight 2.025 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, Cherronesos (or counterfeiter's) mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, selinon (or grape?) leaf on a stem in on of the sunk quadrants, a pellet in the opposite sunk quadrant; only the 2nd example of this type known to Forum; $50.00 (€44.50)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS75422. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Thrace p. 186, 49; SNG Cop 834; McClean -; Weber -; Dewing -; SNG Lockett -, SNG Milan -, SNG Berry -, SNG Dreer -, SNG von Post -, VF, toned, small flan cutting off much of the lion head and bee body, porous, light marks, weight 2.300 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet above X in one sunk quadrant, a bee in the opposite sunk quadrant; rare; $40.00 (€35.60)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS75424. Silver hemidrachm, McClean 4094, BMC Thrace -, Weber , Dewing -, SNG Cop -, SNG Lockett -, SNG Milan -, SNG Dreer -, SNG Berry -, aVF, toned, porous, etched surfaces, obverse off center, better fish than on most examples, weight 2.312 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, fish with its head toward the coin's center in one sunk quadrant, pellet over AΓ ligature in the opposite sunk quadrant; rare; $45.00 (€40.05)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS75440. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Thrace p. 184, 21; Weber 2406; McClean 4066; Dewing 1305; SNG Cop -, SNG Berry -, SNG von Post -, SNG Lockett -, VF, toned, off center, edge cracks, porous, scratches, weight 2.404 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet beside AΓ monogram in one sunken quarter, amphora in the opposite sunken quarter; $38.00 (€33.82)


Cherronesos, Thrace, c. 400 - 338 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Cherronesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Cherronesos. Cherronesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS77713. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Thrace p. 184, 24; Weber 2426; Babelon Traite 1562; McClean -; Dewing -; SNG Cop -; SNG Lockett -; SNG Dreer -; SNG Berry -; SNG Milan -, VF, toned, well centered, light marks, weight 2.226 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, Cherronesos mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet over AΓ monogram in one of the sunken quarter, club beside pellet in the opposite sunken quarter; from the Butte College Foundation, ex-Lindgren; rare; $120.00 (€106.80)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Philippopolis, Thrace

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It seems the Philippopolis mint allowed for many slight variations in legends and types. This variation is apparently unpublished, except Varbanov III 1073, with an unknown obverse legend, and RPC Online 7567 lists an example from the Plovdiv National Museum with an uncertain obverse legend variation. Perhaps one or both of those coins match this type, but photos are not available.
RP69759. Bronze assarion, cf. Varbanov III 1073 (R3, no obv. leg. listed), RPC Online 7567 var. (same, 6 spec., Plovdiv National Museum spec. possible obv. legend var.), aF, well centered, light corrosion, small encrustation above head, weight 4.348 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Philippopolis (Plovdiv, Bulgaria) mint, obverse AYT KAI Λ AYPHΛI OYHPOC (or similar), laureate head right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEITΩN, Homonoia standing left, phiale in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, altar at feet on left; from the Butte College Foundation, ex-Lindgren; rare; $28.00 (€24.92)











Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 22, 2017.
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Thrace & Moesia