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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ AnatoliaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 104 - 98 B.C.

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The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS76186. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 5; Pinder 93; SNG BnF 1713; SNG Cop 419; SNGvA 7466; BMC Mysia p. 124, 102, VF, toned, light marks, weight 12.637 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 104 - 98 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow and ornamented with an apluster, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, AΣ (control letters) above between heads of snakes, Pergamon monogram to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; $175.00 (€155.75)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 92 - 88 B.C.

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The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS76187. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 33; Pinder 108; SNG BnF 1737; SNG Cop 431; SNGvA 7477; BMC Mysia p. 125, 109, gVF, obverse a little off center, uneven toning, flan crack, weight 12.680 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 92 - 88 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow and ornamented with an apluster, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, EY over Prytaneis monogram above, Pergamon monogram to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; $225.00 (€200.25)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 104 - 98 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS76209. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 12; Pinder 95; SNG Cop 420; BMC Mysia p. 124, 106; SNGvA -; SNG BnF -, aVF, obverse struck with a worn die, uneven toning, light marks, weight 12.674 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 104 - 98 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow and ornamented with an apluster, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, ∆I above between heads of snakes, Pergamon monogram to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; $150.00 (€133.50)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 123 - 104 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS76210. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 7; Pinder 101; SNG Cop 424; SNGvA 7465; BMC Mysia p. 126, 125; SNG BnF -, VF, uneven toning, reverse slightly off-center, light marks, weight 12.474 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 123 - 104 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow and ornamented with an apluster, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, ΠA monogram above between heads of snakes, Pergamon monogram to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; $150.00 (€133.50)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 123 - 104 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS76211. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 7; Pinder 101; SNG Cop 424; SNGvA 7465; BMC Mysia p. 126, 125; SNG BnF -, VF, well centered, uneven toning, weight 12.632 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 123 - 104 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow and ornamented with an apluster, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, ΠA monogram above between heads of snakes, Pergamon monogram to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; $150.00 (€133.50)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 92 - 88 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS76212. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 33; Pinder 108; SNG BnF 1737; SNG Cop 431; SNGvA 7477; BMC Mysia, p. 125, 109, VF, well centered, dark uneven toning, struck with a worn obverse die, weight 12.595 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 92 - 88 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow and ornamented with an apluster, flanked on each side by a snake with head erect, EY over Prytaneis monogram above, Pergamon monogram to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; $150.00 (€133.50)


Kalchedon, Bithynia, 387 - 340 B.C.

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The position of Chalcedon, on the eastern shore of the Bosporus, was not as favorable as that of Byzantion on the opposite side. The Persian Megabazus (Herod. iv. 144) said the founders of Chalcedon must have been blind, for Chalcedon was settled seventeen years before Byzantium; and the settlers, we must suppose, had the choice of the two places.
GS75212. Silver drachm, SNG BM Black Sea 104; SNG Cop 352; Rec Gén p. 292, 13; Klein 241; Türkoglu S02aD; HGC 7 511 (S), VF, tight flan, scratches, weight 3.796 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, Kalchedon mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse KAΛX, bull standing left on grain ear left, kerykeion and ∆ over A monogram before legs; reverse quadripartite incuse square with stippled surface; scarce; $150.00 (€133.50)


Kios, Bithynia, c. 340 - 315 B.C.

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In all the other examples known to Forum, KIA is below Apollo, not above. There is some indication of a neck truncation above the KIA, high on the edge of the flan. It seems this is a double strike, not a rare variation.

Traditionally, the earliest precious metal coinage of Kios has been dated after Alexander the Great's capture of Kios in 334 B.C. More recently, however, Oliver Hoover and other numismatists suggest this type, struck on a Persic standard, was probably minted to pay mercenaries to defend against Alexander's invasion, which began in 336 B.C.
GS75217. Silver half siglos, SNGvA 7000; Rec Gén I.2 p. 312, 3, pl. XLIX, 18, BMC Pontus p. 130, 8; HGC 7 553 (C); cf. SNG Cop 377 (same magistrate, 1/4 siglos), VF, attractive style, light marks, slightest etching and porosity, weight 2.416 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 90o, Kios (near Gemlik, Turkey) mint, Poseidonios, magistrate, c. 340 - 315 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, KIA above; reverse war galley prow left, ornamented with star over an apotropaic eye, waves indicated on side of hull, ΠOΣEI∆/ΩNIOΣ (magistrate's name) in two lines one above and one below; rare with KIA above; $150.00 (€133.50)


Kalchedon, Bithynia, 387 - 340 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The position of Chalcedon, on the eastern shore of the Bosporus, was not as favorable as that of Byzantion on the opposite side. The Persian Megabazus (Herod. iv. 144) said the founders of Chalcedon must have been blind, for Chalcedon was settled seventeen years before Byzantium; and the settlers, we must suppose, had the choice of the two places.
GS75222. Silver drachm, SNG BM Black Sea 104; SNG Cop 352; Rec Gén p. 292, 13; Klein 241; Türkoglu S02aD; HGC 7 511 (S), VF, toned, tight flan cutting off part of bull's head, weight 3.745 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, Kalchedon mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse KAΛX, bull standing left on grain ear, kerykeion and ∆ over A monogram before legs; reverse quadripartite incuse square with stippled surface; scarce; $150.00 (€133.50)


Kios, Bithynia, c. 340 - 315 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Traditionally, the earliest precious metal coinage of Kios has been dated after Alexander the Great's capture of Kios in 334 B.C. More recently, however, Oliver Hoover and other numismatists suggest this type, struck on a Persic standard, was probably minted to pay mercenaries to defend against Alexander's invasion, which began in 336 B.C.
GS75224. Silver 1/4 siglos, Rec Gén I.2 p. 312, 4, pl. XLIX, 26; HGC 7 554 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Berry -; SNG Ashmolean -; BMC Pontus -; Klein -; Macdonald -, VF, tight flan, lightly etched and porous surfaces, weight 1.206 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 270o, Kios (near Gemlik, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 315 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, KIA below (off flan); reverse war galley prow left, ornamented with an apotropaic eye, large ram, waves indicated on hull, TEIΣAN/∆POΣ (magistrate's name) in two lines one above and one below; very rare magistrate; $125.00 (€111.25)











Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 22, 2017.
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Anatolia