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Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Aigai, Aiolis

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RPC II p. 161 observes, "The only problem that remains is the identity of the single left-facing head (967). At the moment the obverse inscription cannot be read in full; the portrait looks youngish and rather more like that of Titus than that of Vespasian or Domitian. The discovery of further specimens may resolve this question." Since publication, other examples, including this one, have confirmed the legend identifies the head as Vespasian.
RP85866. Bronze AE 19, RPC II 967, SNG München 376, SNG Cop 24 var. (head right), aVF, partial green patina on brown tone, legends more legible than most examples of the type, weight 5.464 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 1 Jul 69 - 24 Jun 79 A.D.; obverse OYHECΠACIANOC KAICAP (Vespasian, caesar), laureate head left; reverse EΠI AΠOΛΛΩNIOY NEMEONIKOY (magistrate Apollonios, son of Nemeonikos), Apollo standing right, taenia in right hand, laurel branch in left hand, AΓAEΩN downward behind; rare; $110.00 (€93.50)


Kaunos, Caria, c. 197 - 191 B.C. (or Later 2nd Century)

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On the Rosetta Stone, "The Memphis Decree" announces Ptolemy V's rule and ascension to godhood, and describes him as "like Horus." In "A Statue of a Hellenistic King," Journal of Hellenistic Studies, 33 (1913), C. Edgar attributes a statue very similar to the reverse figure to Ptolemy V: "[The statue] stands with right foot drawn back, the toes alone resting on the ground...His head is held erect and his gaze is turned slightly to his right. His shoulders are drawn up a little...[the upper part] unnaturally short in proportion to the lower part of the trunk...[The missing right] forearm was clear of the body. The [missing] left hand was raised and probably rested on a spear." We believe this type is from the among the last issues of Kaunos under Ptolemaic rule, struck after the 13 year old Ptolemy V came of age in 197/6 B.C., perhaps to commemorate his accession, and before he sold the city to the Rhodians for 200 talents of silver in 191 B.C.
GB87087. Bronze AE 16, SNGvA 8103; Lindgren III 425; Imhoof-Blumer KM I, p. 138, 1; BMC Caria -; SNG Cop -; SNG Keckman -; SNG München -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, a little porous/rough, tiny edge crack, weight 2.166 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kaunos mint, c. 197 - 191 B.C. (or later 2nd century); obverse diademed and horned head of Alexander the Great right; reverse youth (Ptolemy V as Horus?) advancing right, nude, long lotus-tipped scepter transverse in left hand, right arm and index finger extended, snake before him coiled around scepter, K-AY (Kaunos) divided high across field, ΣΩ-TAΣ (magistrate) divided across center; very rare; $180.00 (€153.00)


Sinope, Paphlagonia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

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Long used as a Hittite port, Sinope was re-founded as a Greek colony by Miletus in the 7th century B.C. Sinope flourished as the Black Sea port of a caravan route that led from the upper Euphrates valley. The city escaped Persian domination until the early 4th century B.C. In 183 B.C. it was captured by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the kingdom of Pontus. Lucullus conquered Sinope for Rome in 70 B.C., and Julius Caesar established a Roman colony there, Colonia Julia Felix, in 47 B.C. It remained with the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantines). It was a part of the Empire of Trebizond from the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade in 1204 until the capture of the city by the Seljuk Turks of Rûm in 1214.
GS86573. Silver drachm, SNG BM 1488, SNG Stancomb 775, Rec Gen I 34, HGC 7 399, SNG Cop -, VF, nice style, tight flan, scratches and bumps, weight 4.930 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Sinope (Sinop, Turkey) mint, magistrate Kallias, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Sinope left, hair in a sakkos, wearing triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; reverse eagle left, dolphin left in talons, wings open, KAΛΛIAΣ (magistrate's name) below wings, ΣINΩ below dolphin; $240.00 (€204.00)


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 4th - 3rd Centuries B.C.

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Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GS86591. Silver diobol, Baldwin Lampsakos, Group B, Type I; SNG Ashmolean 660; SNG BnF 1195; SNG Cop 191; SNGvA 1295; BMC Mysia p. 83, 36 ff., gVF, well centered and struck, light marks and deposits, weight 1.304 g, maximum diameter 11.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 4th - 3rd Centuries B.C.; obverse Janiform female head, wearing taenia and disk earring; reverse ΛA−M−Ψ (clockwise, starting above), helmeted head of Athena right, in a shallow round incuse; $120.00 (€102.00)


Lampsacus, Mysia, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Recent hoard and coin finds prompted Ashton to reattribute this type to the Troad, probably Lampsakos (Ashton Memnon, NC 162 (2002), pp. 11-15). Ashton suggests ME refers to Memnon of Rhodes, that these coins were struck at Lampsakos when he controlled the city and similar coins inscribed EY and NI possibly refer to Memnon's subordinates. Memnon of Rhodes was a prominent Greek commander in the service of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Related by marriage to the Persian aristocracy, he served the Persian king for most of his life. Memnon was arguably the toughest defender to challenge Alexander and was nearly successful in putting a halt to his advance.
GB86133. Bronze chalkous, Ashton Memnon 10 (A2/P10); Ashton Solar p. 30, 1 ff.; SNG Cop (Caria) 914; Waddington 2813; BMC Caria p. 221, 4; Traité II 1733, VF, green patina, tight flan, earthen deposits, light corrosion, weight 0.658 g, maximum diameter 8.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsacus (near Lapseki, Turkey) mint, under Memnon of Rhodes, c. 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse radiate youthful head of Helios right; reverse rose in profile, M-E flanking low across field; very rare; $140.00 (€119.00)


Lampsacus, Mysia, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Recent hoard and coin finds prompted Ashton to reattribute this type to the Troad, probably Lampsakos (Ashton Memnon, NC 162 (2002), pp. 11-15). Ashton suggests ME refers to Memnon of Rhodes, that these coins were struck at Lampsakos when he controlled the city and similar coins inscribed EY and NI possibly refer to Memnon's subordinates. Memnon of Rhodes was a prominent Greek commander in the service of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Related by marriage to the Persian aristocracy, he served the Persian king for most of his life. Memnon was arguably the toughest defender to challenge Alexander and was nearly successful in putting a halt to his advance.
GB86134. Bronze chalkous, Ashton Memnon 2 (A1/P2); Ashton Solar p. 30, 1; BMC Caria p. 221, 4; SNG Cop (Caria) 914; Waddington 2813; Traité II 1733, VF, green patina, tight flan, earthen deposits, areas of light corrosion, weight 0.708 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsacus (near Lapseki, Turkey) mint, under Memnon of Rhodes, c. 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse radiate youthful head of Helios right; reverse rose in profile, M-E flanking low across field; very rare; $180.00 (€153.00)


Anazarbus, Cilicia, 114 - 115 A.D.

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The torch is a symbol that can be related to either Artemis or Demeter. Although goddess on the reverse is usually identified in references as Artemis, we believe it is Demeter. In year 132, this type was struck at Anazarbus with larger denominations depicting Trajan on the obverse, some with reverses depicting Trajan's sister Marciana, and others with reverses depicting her daughter, Trajan's niece, Matidia. Circulating alongside the other coins, these coins advertised the importance of Marciana and Matidia to the imperial family and suggested that they, similar to Demeter and her daughter Persephone, were essential to the prosperity of the empire.
RP86143. Bronze hemiassaria, BMC Lycaonia p. 31, 3; SNG BnF 2026; SNG Levante 1380 var. (year 132); Ziegler 122; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Righetti -, Choice VF, attractive glossy dark green patina, well centered, a few bumps and scratches, weight 2.809 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, 114 - 115 A.D.; obverse KAICAPIA ANAZAP, veiled bust of Persephone right, grain ears and poppy before; reverse ET ΓΛP (year 133), veiled bust of Demeter right, wearing polos (resembling a pileus), flaming torch before; $150.00 (€127.50)


Erythrai, Ionia, c. 330 - 300 B.C.

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The ruins of Erythrai are north of the town IIldiri in the Cesme district of Izmir Province, Turkey. The city did not lie exactly on the coast, but some little distance inland, and had a harbor on the coast named Cissus. Erythrae was never a large city, but was renowned for its wine, goats, timber, and millstones, as well as its prophetic sibyls, Herophile and Athenais. The Erythraeans were for a considerable time subject to the supremacy of Athens. About 453 B.C. Erythrae, refusing to pay tribute, seceded from the Delian League. A garrison and a new government restored the union, but late in the Peloponnesian War, in 412 B.C. it revolted again with Chios and Clazomenae. Erythrai_amphitheater

GB86474. Bronze AE 21, BMC Ionia p. 128, 102 - 103 var. (diff. magistrate); SNG Cop 634 var. (same); SNG Mün 638 var. (same), SNGvA -; SNG Tüb -; SNG Kayhan -; Lindgren -, VF, well centered, mottled green and red patina, a little rough, weight 4.550 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ionia, Erythrai (north of Ildiri, Turkey) mint, c. 330 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, tied at the neck; reverse EPY above club left, HPO∆OTOΣ / HPAKΛEOY (Herodotos son of Herakleos) in two lines across center, bow inside case right below; apparently unpublished with this magistrate and the only example known to Forum; $80.00 (€68.00)


Octavian, Triumvir and Imperator, c. 31 - 30 B.C., Colonia Julia, Cilicia

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The location of this mint has been the subject of some debate. The monograms on the reverse abbreviate the names of the two duovirs.
RP85834. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 4083 (21 spec.), SNG Levante 597, SNG BnF 778, Lindgren-Kovacs 1553, VF, tight flan, bumps and scratches, light deposits, weight 5.626 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 135o, Colonia Julia mint, c. 31 - 30 B.C.; obverse PRINCEPS FELIX, bare head of Octavian right; countermark edge upper right: capricorn (or Pegasos?) right in a rectangular punch; reverse two humped oxen pulling plow left, COLONIA / IVLIA in two lines above and lower right, IIVIR (duovirs) in upper right field, VE and TER monograms in left field; countermark edge lower left: branch(?) in an oval punch; $140.00 (€119.00)


Lampsakos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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Lampsakos was founded by Greek colonists from Phocaea in the 6th century B.C. Soon afterward it became a main competitor of Miletus, controlling the trade roots in the Dardanelles. During the 6th and 5th centuries B.C., Lampsacus was successively dominated by Lydia, Persia, Athens, and Sparta. Artaxerxes I assigned it to Themistocles with the expectation that the city supply the Persian king with its famous wine. When Lampsacus joined the Delian League after the battle of Mycale in 479 B.C., it paid a tribute of twelve talents, a testimony to its wealth.
GA86592. Silver diobol, Baldwin Lampsakos, group A, type I, pl. V, 8; AMNG III 14; SNGvA 7390; SNG BnF 1126; SNG Ashmolean 653; SNG Cop 184; Rosen 524; SGCV II 3879, EF, well centered, dark toning, a few light marks, reverse die damaged, weight 1.230 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse janiform female heads, each wearing stephanos, with central earring; reverse head of Athena left, wearing Corinthian helmet, within incuse square; $250.00 (€212.50)











Catalog current as of Saturday, May 26, 2018.
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Anatolia