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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ AnatoliaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

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This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RA85621. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC temp 57 (277 spec.), RIC V 149, Hunter VI 54, Normanby 1025, Venèra 9251-9277, Cunetio 2259, Colonne 451, SRCV III 11335, Cohen VI 88, EF, well centered and struck, tight flan, light deposits, flan crack, weight 3.415 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 2nd-3rd issue, mid 269 – spring 270 A.D.; obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FIDES MILIT (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides standing slightly left, holding two flanking standards, one in each hand, S in exergue; $50.00 (€42.50)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

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During the Peloponnesian War, 431 - 404 B.C., Cyzicus was subject alternately to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GS85720. Silver hemiobol, von Fritze III 14; SNG Kayhan 57; SNG BnF 375; SNG Cop 49; BMC Mysia p. 35, 120; SNGvA -, Choice EF, well centered and struck, slightly porous, weight 0.333 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, tunny fish upwards behind; reverse head of roaring lion left, star of four rays above, all in incuse square; $140.00 (€119.00)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

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These very small fractions always weigh less than the theoretical weight for the denomination. They were often struck significantly below the theoretical weight. Wear, corrosion and porosity have usually further reduced the weight over time. They may even weigh less than half their theoretical weight. Assigning the denomination during attribution is often speculative.
GA85721. Silver obol, SNG BnF 378; SNG Cop 48; SNG Kayhan 55; BMC Mysia p. 35, 118; Von Fritze II 11, gVF, sharp detail, lightly etched surfaces, earthen deposits, tight flan, weight 0.798 g, maximum diameter 11.7 mm, die axis 270o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse forepart of boar running left, reversed E on side, tunny fish upwards behind (tunny off flan); reverse head of roaring lion left within incuse square; $150.00 (€127.50)


Klazomenai, Ionia, c. 499 - 494 B.C.

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Klazomenai (or Clazomenae) was an ancient Greek city on the coast of Ionia and a member of the Ionian League. It was one of the first cities to issue silver coinage. Its ruins are now located in the modern town Urla near Izmir in Izmir Province, Turkey.
GA85719. Silver diobol, SNGvA 1984, SNG Tübingen 455, SNG Cop 7, SNG München -, BMC Ionia -, VF, toned, scratches, porosity, edge cracks, weight 1.049 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 0o, Klazomenai (near Urla Turkey) mint, c. 499 - 494 B.C.; obverse forepart of a winged boar right, A above; reverse quadripartite incuse square; scarce variety; $130.00 (€110.50)


Assos, Troas, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

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Assos was a harbor city on the Gulf of Adramytteion, just north of the island of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).
GS85697. Silver triobol, Traité II 2304 var. (AΣΣOON), cf. Weber 5320 (drachm), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Mün –, SNG Ash –, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Keckman -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, a little porous, weight 1.743 g, maximum diameter 12.1 mm, die axis 90o, Assus mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse helmeted and laureate head of Athena left; reverse AΣΣION (retrograde), roaring lion head left, within square incuse; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 49, lot 177; very rare; $450.00 (€382.50)


Mytilene, Lesbos, c. 454 - 427 B.C.

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Mytilene revolted against Athens in 428 B.C. but was overcome by an Athenian expeditionary force. The Athenian public assembly voted to massacre all the men of the city and to sell the women and children into slavery but changed its mind the next day. A fast trireme sailed the 186 nautical miles (344 km) in less than a day and brought the decision to cancel the massacre.
SH85699. Electrum hekte, Bodenstedt 52; Boston MFA 1700; SNG Cop 325; SNGvA 7731; SNG Fitzwilliam 4344; BMC Troas p. 121, 56 & pl. 32, 25; HGC 6 978 (R1), aVF, weight 2.573 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 454 - 427 B.C.; obverse young male head (river god?) right, short hair, wearing taenia; reverse archaizing bearded male head (Dionysos?) right, long pointed beard, within incuse square; $580.00 (€493.00)


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Artaxerxes I - Artaxerxes II, c. 450 - 375 B.C.

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This type was minted in Lydia in Anatolia, while under Persian control, prior to Alexander the Great's conquest. The Persian or Achaemenid Empire (c. 550 - 330 B.C.) was the largest empire in ancient history extending across Asia, Africa and Europe, including Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, parts of Central Asia, Asia Minor, Thrace and Macedonia, much of the Black Sea coastal regions, Iraq, northern Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Palestine and Israel, Lebanon, Syria, and much of ancient Egypt as far west as Libya.Persian Empire

GA85700. Silver siglos, Carradice Type IIIb (late), pl. XIV, 36 ff.; SNG Kayhan 1029; Rosen 671 - 672; SGCV II 4682; Klein 761; Carradice Price p. 69 and pl. 18, 79 ff., gF, well centered, dark toning, scratches, weight 5.181 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 375 B.C.; obverse kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned, stylistic drapery with broad semi-circular sweep of folds; banker's mark; reverse irregular rectangular punch; $130.00 (€110.50)


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes I - Darius II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

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After the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah, the Jews were taken into the seventy-year Babylonian captivity. When ancient Persia took control of Babylon, Haman, the royal vizier, convinced King Ahasuerus to destroy all the Jews. Esther, Ahasuerus' queen and, unknown to him, a Jew, interceded on behalf of her people. By law the King could not rescind the order to slaughter the Jews, so he issued a second decree that permitted the Jews to defend themselves with armed force. The King replaced Haman with Mordecai, a palace official, cousin and foster parent of Esther. The Jews defeated Haman, killing his ten sons that were leading the attacks, and then hanged Haman. The day after the battle was designated as a day of feasting and rejoicing. Scholars identify King Ahasuerus as the historical king Xerxes I, 485 - 465 B.C. Xerxes is the Greek version of his name but the Babylonians knew him as Khshayarsha. The Hebrew name Ahasuerus, appears to be derived from Khshayarsha, with the letter A added at the beginning.
GA85707. Silver siglos, Carradice type IIIb (early); Carradice NC 1998 pl. 7, 155 ff.; Rosen 673; SGCV II 4682; Winzer 1.11; Sunrise 25, VF, well centered, toned, lightly etched and porous, weight 5.479 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse irregular rectangular punch; $200.00 (€170.00)


Miletos, Ionia, c. Late 6th Century B.C.

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One of the earliest coins struck in silver.
GA85710. Silver 1/12 stater, SNG Kayhan 462; SNG Cop 952; BMC Ionia p. 186, 34; SGCV II 3533, Choice EF, attractive lion, bold strike, toned, weight 1.192 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. late 6th century B.C.; obverse forepart of lion left, head turned back right; reverse ornamental pattern in incuse square; $200.00 (€170.00)


Miletos, Ionia, c. Late 6th Century B.C.

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Before the Persian invasion in the middle of the 6th century B.C., Miletus was the greatest and wealthiest of Greek cities and had a maritime empire with many colonies. After Cyrus of Persia defeated Croesus of Lydia in the middle of the 6th century B.C., Miletus fell under Persian rule.
GA85711. Silver 1/12 stater, SNG Kayhan 476; SNG Cop 944; BMC Ionia p 185, 22; SGCV II 3532, Choice EF, toned, light marks, slight porosity, weight 1.179 g, maximum diameter 10 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. late 6th century B.C.; obverse forepart of lion right, head turned back left; reverse ornamental pattern in incuse square; $200.00 (€170.00)











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Anatolia