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Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 BC

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According to Ptolemaic bronze expert Daniel Wolf, "These coins are attributed by Svoronos to Ake-Ptolemas (Acre), but modern finds indicate they are most likely from the area near (modern) Bodrum in Turkey." Bodrum was called Halicarnassus, Caria in ancient times and was famous for housing the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
GP84507. Bronze dichalkon, Svoronos 793 (Ptolemy II, Ake-Ptolemais), Weiser 80 (Ptolemy III), BMC Ptolemies -, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, Noeske -, Malter -, Hosking -, F, green patina, earthen deposits, edge cracks, minor edge chipping, porosity, centration dimples, weight 3.405 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Caria (Halicarnassus?) mint, 246 - 222 BC; obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing half left atop fulmen, head left, wings closed, tripod in left field; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $90.00 (80.10)


Nacrasa, Lydia, c. 138 - 161 A.D.

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The site of the ancient city of Nakrasa, Lydia has been identified on a hill overseeing the Bakirchay Valley about two miles southeast of Kirkagach, Turkey. Nakrasa was on a major road and was an important fortress for the Kingdom of Pergamon.
RP84510. Bronze AE 16, RPC III 1812; SNG Cop 295; BMC Lydia p. 166, 7; SNG Munchen 335; SNGvA 3033 var. (magistrate); Imhoof-Blumer Lydien -, aVF/F, well centered, green patina, light corrosion, weight 2.749 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Nakrasa (near Kirkagach, Turkey) mint, Marcus Junianus strategos, c. 98 - 150 A.D.; obverse EΠI CTPA MAP IOVNIANOV, bearded head of Herakles right; reverse NAKPACITΩN, snake coiled around omphalos, head left; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; rare; $100.00 (89.00)


Persian Empire, Uncertain Satrap (Mazaios in Cilicia?), Mid 4th Century B.C.

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Both the satrap and the satrapy for this type are uncertain. Traditionally it has been attributed to Evagoras II who, after he was deposed as the king of Salamis, Cyprus, became the Persia satrap at Sidon, Phoenicia, c. 351 - 346 B.C. Axel Winzer attributes it to Mazaios, the Persian satrap in Cilicia, c. 361 - 334 B.C.
GS84512. Silver obol, Winzer 18.3 (Mazaios); Gktrk 52; SNGvA 8657; Trait II 1182 (Evagoras II); BMC Cyprus p. cx, 15 (Evagoras II); SNG BnF -; SNG Levante -, aVF, nice style, rough, tight flan, reverse off center, weight 0.545 g, maximum diameter 11.7 mm, die axis 315o, uncertain (Tarsos?) mint, mid 4th century B.C.; obverse head of satrap left, wearing kyrbasia, star before, linear border; reverse turreted and draped bust of Tyche (or Tyche-Aphrodite) left, linear border; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $70.00 (62.30)


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, c. Mid 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
RP84498. Bronze AE 22, RPC IX 478 (9 spec., same dies), SNGvA 1465 (same dies), SNG Cop 106 (same dies), Bellinger Troy A495, SNG Munchen -, BMC Troas -, Choice gVF, nice green patina, attractive style, weight 6.754 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, c. mid 3rd century A.D.; obverse CO - ALEX TR, turreted bust of Tyche right, vexillum with CO over AV on ensign behind; reverse she-wolf right, head turned back left, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, COL AVG above, TROA in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $150.00 (133.50)


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, 253 - 268 A.D.

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Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
RP84513. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 117; SNG Munchen 63; BMC Troas p. 15, 53 ff. var. (legends); RPC Online IX 497 var. (same); Bellinger Troy A490; SNGvA -, VF, tight flan, sharp detail, slightly rough, weight 4.852 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, reign of Gallienus, 253 - 268 A.D.; obverse AL-EXA TRO, turreted and draped bust of Tyche of Alexandria Troas right, vexillum behind; reverse CO - A-VG - TRO, eagle flying right, bull head right its talons; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $70.00 (62.30)


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, c. 95 - 85 B.C.

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Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
GB84518. Bronze AE 18, SNG Munchen 47; SNG Cop 77; SNG Fitzwilliam 4254; BMC Troas p. 10, 21; SNGvA 1458 var. (monogram); Bellinger Troy A175, VF, turquoise-green patina, reddish earthen highlighting, porosity, tight flan, weight 4.114 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, c. 95 - 85 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse AΛEΞAN, horse grazing left, monogram below, thunderbolt in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $75.00 (66.75)


Laodicea ad Lycum, Phrygia, c. 14 - 37 A.D.

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Luna, the Greek moon goddess, was female, which seems natural because the female menstrual cycle follows the lunar month. But Mn was a male moon-god, probably originally of the indigenous non-Greek Karian people. By Roman times Mn was worshiped across Anatolia and in Attica. He was associated with fertility, healing, and punishment. Mn is usually depicted with a crescent moon behind his shoulders, wearing a Phrygian cap, and holding a lance or sword in one hand and a pine-cone or patera in the other. His other attributes include the bucranium and chicken. A temple of Mn has been excavated at Antioch, Pisidia.
RP84485. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2907; SNG Cop 513 ff.; BMC Phrygia p. 288, 64 ff.; Lindgren-Kovacs 984, VF, attractive style, nice green patina, reverse slightly off center, some light corrosion, weight 3.892 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodikeia ad Lycum mint, time of Tiberius, c. 14 - 37 A.D.; obverse ΛAO∆I−KEΩN, bust of Mn right, draped, wearing Phrygian cap with ear flaps, laurel wreath, and necklace, crescent behind shoulders; reverse KOP (ligate), ∆IOΣKOYPI∆HΣ (Cornelius Dioskurides, magistrate), eagle standing slightly right on branch (or club), head left, wings slightly open; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, ex Gitbud & Naumann e-auction 33 (5 Jul 2015), lot 372; $140.00 (124.60)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Koinon of Bithynia

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The mint location for the Koinon of Bithynia is uncertain but it was probably Nicomedia. Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared the nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa in the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RP84486. Bronze AE 21, RPC Online III 1017 (3 spec.); Rec Gen I.2 p. 241, 38; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; 38; BMC Pontus -, gF, brown patina, some roughness, smoothing on reverse, reverse die breaks, cracks, weight 25.115 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain (Nicomedia?) mint, 2nd issue; obverse AYT KAIC TPAI A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate head right; reverse octastyle temple (Temple of Rome and Augustus at Nicomedia?), Corinthian columns, on podium of two steps, pellet between middle columns, pediment ornamented with a small figure holding a scepter and sacrificing on an altar, KOI-NON in divided line flanking across center, BEIOYNIANC over prow right in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group e-auction 349 (22 Apr 2015), lot 263; better than the RPC plate coin; very rare; $240.00 (213.60)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C.

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Although the primary references do not specify the arrangement of the reverse inscription, most specimens of this issue have the have the royal title on the right and Lysimachos' name in the exergue. This variant with the title in the exergue and his name right is very rare and was first described in the referenced article by Nicholas A. Sicurella, published in The Celator in June 1996.
GS84487. Silver drachm, Sicurella, N. "An unpublished drachm of Lysimachus" in The Celator 10.6 (June 1996), figs. 1-2; Price L12; Thompson 36; Mller 25; SNG BnF -, gVF, lightly toned, minor marks, small flaw on edge, some minor edge flaking, weight 4.141 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 135o, Mysia, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 299 - 296 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, dolphin left above lion forepart left (control symbols) on left, torch (control symbol) below throne; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, ex CNG e-auction 296 (13 Feb 2013), lot 25; $380.00 (338.20)


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Plain Globular Type

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Mankind's first coin type! Rare and important. This is an example of the very earliest form of coinage; a type-less (blank) electrum globule, weighed to a specific standard, with a simple square punch mark on one side (two or three punch marks on larger denominations). Nine similar electrum pieces were within the famous "Artemision Find" at Ephesus in 1904.
SH84751. Electrum 1/24th stater, SNG Kayhan 678, Weidauer -, Rosen -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, VF, bumps, marks, and scratches, reverse struck with a damaged punch (one corner broken), weight 1.129 g, maximum diameter 6.9 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse plain globular surface; reverse incuse punch: roughly square pyramid with sides striated from wear; rare; $720.00 (640.80)











Catalog current as of Sunday, April 30, 2017.
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Anatolia