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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ AnatoliaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!

Skepsis, Troas, c. 350 - 306 B.C.

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Skepsis or Scepsis, an ancient settlement in the Troad, is today the village of Kursunlutepe, near the town of Bayramic in Turkey. The famous library of Aristotle was kept at Skepsis before being moved to Pergamum and then Alexandria. It was also home to Metrodorus of Scepsis and Demetrius of Scepsis. Several times in its history, the citizens of Skepsis were forced to move elsewhere. In 306 B.C., Antigonus evacuated Skepsis and other cities in the area and forced the residents to move to Alexandria Troas. Tradition holds that Saint Cornelius the Centurion, the first Gentile convert to Christianity, became the first bishop of Skepsis in the early days of Christianity.Skepsis

GB86652. Bronze AE 19, BMC Troas p. 82, 20 var. (Pegasos left); SNGvA 7650 var. (control); SNG Cop 473 var. (same), SNG Mn 326 var. (same); SNG Tb 2660 var. (same), VF, dark patina, light encrustations and earthen deposits, light corrosion/pitting, weight 7.735 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Skepsis (Kursunlutepe, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 306 B.C.; obverse Ryton (ornate drinking vessel) in the shape of Pegasos forepart right; reverse fir-tree within linear rectangular frame, Σ-K-H (ethnic, S-K flanking tree within frame, H outside on right), thyrsus (control symbol) outside the frame on left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Korykos, Cilicia, 1st Century B.C.

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Korykos (Corycus) was the port for Seleucia, an important harbor and commercial town. The Romans defeated the fleet of Antiochus the Great near Korykos, in 191 B.C. In Roman imperial times emperors usually kept a fleet there to watch over the pirates.

Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
RP87151. Bronze AE 18, SNG Levante 798 (same dies); Imhoof-Blumer KM II p. 462, 1; SNG BnF 1099 var. (magistrate); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Lycaonia -, F, dark patina, scrapes, scratches, pitting, weight 3.110 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Korykos (Kizkalesi, Turkey) mint, Roman rule, 1st century B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder, Σ below chin; reverse Apollo standing left, holding laurel branch in extended right hand, leaning with left elbow on column, YB upper left (unstruck?), ME lower left, KΩPYKIΩTΩN downward on right; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00

Keraeitai, Pisidia, c. 100 - 70 B.C.

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Keraeitai (also spelled Keraitai, Ceraitae) was about 9 km northeast of ancient Kremna, Pisidia, a few miles from the modern village Belren, in Buckak District, Turkey. Keraeitai was on a hill about 1300 meters high, concentrated east of the Acropolis on a plain 1100 - 1200 meters high, protected by a 5 - 6 meters high wall atop steep slopes. The city held a dominant point to control narrow the passages below. Known as "Sivri Tepe" and "Cene Sivrisi" by the local people, K. Drtlk identified the ruins as Keraitai after a coin reading KEPAEITΩN was found on the site in 1972. Keraitai produced homonia coins with Kremna in the 1st century B.C., and was placed under the authority of Kremna when Augustus designated Kremna a Roman colony in 25 B.C. The city had a substantial temple dedicated to Mn, the Anatolian moon god.
GB87155. Bronze AE 13, vA Pisidiens II, p. 97, 731 - 737; SNGvA 5055; SNG BnF 1421; SNG Cop 117; Waddington 3663; SNG PfPs 235 var. (no O), VF, green patina, light earthen deposits, light corrosion, weight 2.125 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 270o, Keraeitai mint, c. 100 - 70 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Artemis right, quiver over shoulder; reverse club, ⊦ O above, KE below; rare city; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00

Kaunos, Caria, c. 309 - 189 B.C.

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In 189 B.C. the Roman senate put Kaunos under Rhodes. In 167, Kaunos and other cities revolted against Rhodes. As a result, Rome removed Rhodes' authority. In 129, Rome established the Province of Asia, covering a large part of western Anatolia. Kaunos was assigned to Lycia. When Mithridates invaded in 88 B.C., the Kaunians joined him and killed all the Romans in the city. After the peace of 85 B.C. as part of their punishment, Kaunos was again put under Rhodian administration.
GB87103. Bronze AE 11, SNG Keckman 75; SNGvA 8100; SNG Cop 184; BMC Caria p. 75, 12, VF, Tiber patina, obverse a little off center, rough, weight 1.174 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Kaunos mint, c. 309 - 189 B.C.; obverse diademed young head (Alexander the Great?) right; reverse cornucopia bound with fillet, K-AY (AY in monogram) divided across field; scarce; $40.00 SALE PRICE $36.00

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Apamea, Phrygia

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While playing the flute Athena saw her reflection in the water and disturbed by how her cheeks looked, puffed up while playing, threw away the instrument in disgust. The satyr Marsyas picked up the flute and since it had once been inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully on its own accord. Elated by his success, Marsyas challenged Apollo to a musical contest. For the prize, the victor could do what he pleased with the vanquished. The Muses were the umpires. Apollo played the cithara and Marsyas the flute. Only after Apollo added his voice to the music of his lyre was the contest decided in his favor. As a just punishment for the presumption of Marsyas, Apollo bound him to a tree and flayed him alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and Apollo hung up his skin, like a wine bag, in the cave out of which that river flows.
RP87110. Bronze AE 19, SNG Cop 212 corr. (KAI CEB, same dies); BMC Phrygia p. 96, 155 & pl. XI, 10 (same rev. die); Weber 7036; RPC III 2586; SNGvA 3492; SNG Mn 155, gVF, tight flan, rough etched porous surfaces, weight 3.927 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Apameia (Dinar, Turkey) mint, obverse A∆PIANOC KAIC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right, with aegis; reverse AΠAMEΩN MAPCYAC KIBΩTOI, Marsyas, naked but for chlamys over lower limbs, reclining left in rocky cave, above which are two or five chests, holding cornucopia in his raised right hand, double flute in left hand; beneath him, inverted vase from which water flows; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00

Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Antioch ad Maeandrum, Caria

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Antiochia on the Maeander (earlier named Pythopolis) was a city of ancient Caria, in Anatolia, located between the Maeander and Orsinus rivers near their confluence. It was the site of a bridge over the Maeander. The scanty ruins are located on a hill (named, in Turkish, Yeniser) a few km southeast of Kuyucak, Aydin Province, Turkey, near the modern city of Basaran. The city already existed when Antiochus I enlarged and renamed it. It was home to the sophist Diotrephes. It has not been excavated, although Christopher Ratte and others visited the site in 1994 and produced a sketch plan.
RP87111. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2836, SNG BnF 144, SNG Fitzwilliam 4672, BMC Caria , SNGvA , SNG Cop , VF, tight flan, earthen deposits, green patina with some flaking, marks, light corrosion, weight 4.570 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Antiochia ad Maeandrum mint, obverse TIBEPIOΣ KΛAY∆IOΣ ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse MYΩNOΣ ΣYNAPXIA ANTIOXEΩN, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond vertical before her; very rare; $240.00 SALE PRICE $216.00

Lesbos, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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A most unusual use of illusion on a coin. The two confronting boars' heads can also be viewed as the facing head of a panther.
GA87115. Billon 1/10 stater, BMC Troas p. 151, 14; SNG Cop 287; Trait I, p. 350, 564; SNGvA 7712 var. (no ethnic); SNG Munchen 645 ff. var. (same); Rosen 542 var. (same), VF, porous, weight 0.982 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, uncertain Koinon of Lesbos mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse confronting boar heads, creating the illusion of a facing head of a panther, ΛEΣ above; reverse quadripartite incuse square punch; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Kingdom of Bithynia, Prusias II Kynegos, 185 - 149 B.C.

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Prusias II, son of Prusias I, inherited his father's name but not his character. He first joined with Eumenes of Pergamon in war against Pontus, but later turned on Pergamon and invaded. He was defeated and Pergamon demanded heavy reparations. Prusias sent his son Nicomedes II to Rome to ask for aid in reducing the payments. When Nicomedes revolted, Prusias II was murdered in the temple of Zeus at Nikomedia.
GB87136. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 636; BMC Pontus p. 211, 12; HGC 7 629; SGCV II 7266, VF, dark patina, bumps and scratches, corrosion, weight 6.065 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c. 180 - 150 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy; reverse centaur Chiron standing right, playing lyre, his cloak flying behind, ΠΨ monogram inner right under raised foreleg, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ΠPOYΣIOY downward on left; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00

Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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An excellent gift for a veterinarian! The 18th-century French numismatist Belley, cited in BMC Mysia p. 105, suggested that the SVB in the reverse legend should be expanded to "subvenienti," giving the meaning "To Aesculapius, the god who helps." This extraordinary depiction of Aesculapius is the only ancient coin reverse type referring to veterinary medicine.
RP87143. Bronze AE 22, RPC Online VI temp 3871 (unpublished in refs, 4 spec. listed from auctions); SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, SNG BnF -, SNG anakkale -, BMC Mysia -, VF, porosity, light corrosion, edge flaw, weight 4.773 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 45o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP CAEƧ L ƧEP ƧEV ALEXANDER, laureate and cuirassed bust, right from the front, wearing cuirass with Gorgoneion; reverse DEO AE ƧVB (Deo Aesculapius subvenienti - to Aesculapius, the god who helps), Asclepius seated right on throne, treating an injured bull standing left before him, with his right hand holding the bull's raised right foreleg, C G H I P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 39 (26 Aug 2017), lot 470; rare; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00

Agrippina Junior, Augusta 50 - March 59 A.D., Philadelphia, Lydia

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Philadelphia was an important and wealthy trade center in ancient Lydia that retained its importance until late Byzantine times. In 17 A.D., the city suffered greatly in an earthquake. After Tiberius aided in rebuilding, it took the new name of Neocaesarea. Under Vespasian, it was titled Flavia. Saint Paul and Saint John the Theologian, visited, and established the first Christian churches. St. Ignatius of Antioch visited on his trip to his martyrdom in Rome. Philadelphia is among the Seven Churches named in John's Book of Revelation. But in the 6th century, paganism still held on in the face of a Christianizing Empire, and the city became known as "little Athens" for its dedication to deities. Today the modern city is called Alasehir.
RP87144. Bronze AE 15, RPC I 3042; BMC Lydia p. 196, 59; SNG Cop 375; SNGvA -, VF, dark green patina, reverse off center, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Philadelphia (Alasehir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Ti. Neikanor, c. 54 - 59 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠΠINA ΣEBAΣTH, draped bust right, hair in long plait down back of neck and looped at end, long loosely curled lock down side of neck; reverse cornucopia overflowing with fruit and grain, ΦIΛA−∆EΛΦE/ΩN N−EIKA/NΩ−P across field in three divided lines; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 39 (26 Aug 2017), lot 410 ; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00

Catalog current as of Saturday, March 24, 2018.
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