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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ AnatoliaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP85311. Silver drachm, RPC II 1636 (6 spec.); Sydenham Cappadocia 96; Metcalf Conspectus p. 94, 7; BMC Galatia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aF, marks and scratches, weight 2.536 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 73 - 74 A.D.; obverse AYOKPA KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ETOYC EKTOY (year 6), Mount Argaeus surmounted by a statue of figure standing facing, radiate, globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; very rare; $95.00 (€84.55)


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 340 - 325 B.C.

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Ephesos, on the west coast of Anatolia, was one of the 12 cities of the Ionian League. It was famous for its Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C., one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The usual symbols of this nature-goddess are the torch, stag, and the bee. Coins of Ephesos most frequently depict a bee on the obverse. The high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called the King Bee, while the virgin priestesses were called honey-bees (Melissae). Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia cited in the Book of Revelation and the Gospel of John may have been written there.
SH75181. Silver tetradrachm, Pixodarus p. 192, class H (post-hoard, cites Berlin); Trait้ II p. 1106, 1183; SNG Cop -; SNG Mun -; SNG Tub -; SNGvA -; SNG Kayhan -; BMC Ionia -, aVF, well centered, die wear and breaks on the obverse, weight 15.057 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 340 - 325 B.C.; obverse bee with straight wings, E−Φ flanking head; reverse forepart of stag kneeling right, looking left, palm tree with two bunches of fruit on left, XIMAPOΣ downward on right; very rare; $800.00 (€712.00)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Sagalassos, Pisidia

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Sagalassos, Pisidia, high in the western Taurus Mountains, was within the Roman province of Asia from 133 until 39 B.C., when Rome gave the region to the Galatian client king Amyntas. After he was killed in 25 B.C., the kingdom became the province of Galatia. Sagalassos became the "first city" of Pisidia and the center of the imperial cult. Sagalassos city was abandoned in the middle of the seventh century after it was destroyed by a plaque, Arab raids, and earthquakes. Survivors likely resettled in the valley below.
RP84970. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 3525 (7 spec.), SNG BnF 1751, SNGvA 5163, McClean 8998, BMC Lycia -, VF, attractive dark green patina, nice portrait, weight 9.487 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sagalassos (near Aglasun, Turkey) mint, 63 - 9 Jun 68 A.D.; obverse NEPWN KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse CAΓAΛACCWN, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, himation around hips and legs and over left shoulder, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; extremely rare; $250.00 (€222.50)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian, Tmolus, Lydia

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The primary reference for Tmolus is: Foss, C. "A neighbor of Sardis: the city of Tmolus and its successors" in Classical Antiquity, vol. 1, no. 2 (Oct. 1982), pp. 178-201, available online: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25010770

Foss wrote that the small city of Tmolus was first authorized to strike coins under Hadrian. He believed that Tmolus issued coinage only very sporadically and the coins were probably struck at the mint of their neighbor Sardis.
RP85354. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 2388 (5 spec.); SNG Cop 635; NC 1903, p. 337, 29 and pl. X, 12 rev.; Foss Tmolus p. 181, type I, VF, grainy surface, edge split, weight 4.542 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 190o, struck for Tmolus at Sardis(?) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CEBACTH CABEINA, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse TMΩΛITΩN, Apollo standing right, nude, bow in right hand, arrow in left hand; very rare; $200.00 (€178.00)


Kolophon, Ionia, Late 6th Century B.C.

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Kolophon was once the strongest of the Ionian cities and renowned both for its cavalry and for the inhabitants' luxurious lifestyle until Gyges of Lydia conquered it in the 7th century B.C. Kolophon then went into decline and was eclipsed by neighboring Ephesus and by the rising naval power, Miletus.
GA85103. Silver tetartemorion, SNG Kayhan 343, SNGvA 1810, SNG Cop -, Milne Kolophon -, Rosen -, Klein -, EF, well centered, toned, slightly etched surfaces, weight 0.185 g, maximum diameter 5.8 mm, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, late 6th century B.C.; obverse head of Apollo left; reverse irregular quadripartite incuse square; $100.00 (€89.00)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Aezanis, Phrygia

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A brockage occurs when a blank is struck with a previously struck coin which adhered to the opposite die. Click here to read a detailed explanation.
ME85351. Bronze AE 20, cf. RPC I 3098, VF, weight 6.622 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, Aezanis mint, obverse KΛAY∆IOΣ KAIΣAP, laureate head right; reverse incuse of obverse; $200.00 (€178.00)


Sardes, Lydia, 2nd Century B.C.

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Sardis was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, one of the important cities of the Persian Empire, the seat of a proconsul under the Roman Empire, and the metropolis of the province Lydia in later Roman and Byzantine times. Its importance was due first to its military strength, secondly to its situation on an important highway leading from the interior to the Aegean coast, and thirdly to its commanding the wide and fertile plain of the Hermus. As one of the Seven churches of Asia, it was addressed by John, the author of the Book of Revelation in the Holy Bible, in terms which seem to imply that its population was notoriously soft and fainthearted. Remains including the bath-gymnasium complex, synagogue and Byzantine shops are open to visitors year-round.
GB85236. Orichalcum AE 17, cf. SNG Cop 470 ff.; BMC Lydia p. 238, 10 ff.; SNGvA 3125 f. (all refs. various monograms, none the same), VF, nicely centered, adjustment marks, a little rough, weight 3.811 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 135o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 2nd Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse club, ΣAP∆I/ANΩN divided in two lines above and below, all in oak-wreath tied on the left and closed with a monogram on the right; $100.00 (€89.00)


Kyme, Aeolis, 165 - 140 B.C.

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In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a nation of all-female warriors Herodotus placed them in a region bordering Scythia in Sarmatia (modern territory of Ukraine). Other historiographers place them in Asia Minor or Libya.
SH85285. Silver tetradrachm, SNGvA 1636; SNG Cop 103; BMC Troas, p. 111, 73; Weber 5502, gEF, some obverse die rust, areas of slightest porosity, weight 16.394 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kyme mint, 165 - 140 B.C.; obverse head of Amazon Kyme right, wearing taenia; reverse horse walking right, oinochoe below raised left foreleg, KYMAIΩN downward on right, KAΛΛIAΣ (magistrate) in exergue, all in laurel wreath tied at the bottom; ex Forum (2009), ex Pegasi; $1250.00 (€1112.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP12057. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, F, encrusted, marks and scratches, small edge splits, weight 1.798 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm over left shoulder in left hand; $70.00 (€62.30)


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C., Sardes, Lydia

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Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as King.
GB85167. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber I 524(3); HGC 9 253a, Houghton CSE 598 var. (controls), VF, dark patina with areas of exposed bronze, tight flan, light corrosion, weight 3.136 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 4th series; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, wavy locks falling forward over shoulder and down back of neck; reverse tripod lebes, , BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, ∆H monogram (control) outer left, o∆ monogram (control) outer right, anchor flukes right below; $80.00 (€71.20)











Catalog current as of Monday, June 26, 2017.
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Anatolia