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Ancient Coins of Anatolia (Asia Minor)

Anatolia is the region comprising most of modern Turkey, bounded by the Black (North), Aegean (West) and Mediterranean (South) seas; to the East it is bounded by the Taurus Mountains and main Asia. The name comes from Ionian Greek meaning "the land of the sunrise" or simply "the East." It was named Asia Minor by the Romans. The land is first mentioned by Akkadian records, and played a very important role for all subsequent Mesopotamian civilizations. We should not forget to add that Anatolia is the birthplace of coinage in the late 7th Century B.C.!


Lampsacus (as Colonia Gemella Iulia Lampsacus), Mysia, c. 45 - 35 B.C.

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M. Grant (Grant FITA, p. 246) first and convincingly attributed this type to Lampsacus. P. Brunt (Italian Manpower, p. 600) argues convincingly that the colony was founded by Julius Caesar about 45 B.C. and disappeared after its occupation by Sextus Pompey in 35 B.C. Marcus Turius was the legate (governor) of Asia, 42 - 40 B.C. The countermark is listed in RPC I on other issues of the colony.
RP85355. Bronze as, RPC I 2272 (2 specimens), Grant FITA 246(4), SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -; Countermark: Howgego -, F, a little rough with some smoothing, only three specimens known to Forum, weight 4.044 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 45o, Lampsacus mint, 42 - 40 B.C.; obverse head of Janus, C G - I L (Colonia Gemella Iulia Lampsacus) divided across field, countermark: cornucopia, C - C flanking at sides, within a roughly square punch; reverse galley prow right, Q LVCRETI / L PONTI IIVIR (duumvirs) above, M TVRIO LEG (Marcus Turius, legate) below; extremely rare; $800.00 (€712.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 610 - 561 B.C.

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According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85480. Electrum hemihekte, Weidauer Series XVI 90, SNG Kayhan 1015, SNGvA 2871, Rosen 654, Boston MFA 1770, aVF, banker's mark on edge, tiny edge crack, light scratches, weight 1.153 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 610 - 546 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, knob on forehead; reverse square incuse punch; $450.00 (€400.50)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

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The cistophorus was first struck by the Pergamene Kingdom was a tetradrachm (four-drachms coin) struck on a reduced Asian standard of about 3 grams per drachm. Its name was derived from the cista, a Dionysian cult snake basket that frequently appeared on the obverse. After the Pergamene Kingdom was bequeathed to Rome in 133 B.C., the Romans continued to strike cistophori for the Asia province, with a value equal to three denarii. The portrait of Augustus and later emperors replaced the cista on the obverse.
SH85434. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Sutherland Group VI, RPC I 2215, RIC I 479, RSC I 33, BnF I 922, BMCRE I 694, BMCRR East 262, SRCV I 1587, VF, full circles strike on a broad flan, light uneven toning, light encrustations, small closed edge crack, weight 11.660 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesus mint, c. 24 - 20 B.C.; obverse IMP CAE-SAR (counterclockwise below), bare head right, linear border; reverse garlanded and filleted altar of Diana (artemis, ornamented on the front with two hinds standing confronted, AVGVSTVS above; $1200.00 (€1068.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 610 - 561 B.C.

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According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85438. Electrum hemihekte, Weidauer Series XVI 90, SNG Kayhan 1015, SNGvA 2871, Rosen 654, Boston MFA 1770, VF, well centered, scratches, earthen deposits, small edge crack, weight 1.164 g, maximum diameter 7.2 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 610 - 546 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, knob on forehead; reverse square incuse punch; $800.00 (€712.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 610 - 561 B.C.

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According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85439. Electrum hemihekte, Weidauer Series XVI 90, SNG Kayhan 1015, SNGvA 2871, Rosen 654, Boston MFA 1770, VF, light marks, earthen deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.181 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 610 - 546 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, knob on forehead; reverse square incuse punch; $600.00 (€534.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 625 - 546 B.C.

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According to Herodotus, the Lydians were the first people to use gold and silver coins and the first to establish retail shops in permanent locations. It is not known, however, whether Herodotus meant that the Lydians were the first to use coins of pure gold and pure silver or the first precious metal coins in general. Despite this ambiguity, this statement of Herodotus is one of the pieces of evidence most often cited on behalf of the argument that Lydians invented coinage, at least in the West, even though the first coins were neither gold nor silver but an alloy of the two called electrum.
SH85433. Electrum trite, Weidauer Series XVI 86, SNGvA 2869, SNG Kayhan 1013, Rosen 655, Boston MFA 1763, VF, banker's mark, some light scratches, weight 4.683 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 625 - 546 B.C; obverse Head of roaring lion right, with knob and rays atop snout; reverse two incuse squares; $2000.00 (€1780.00)


Lydian Kingdom, Kroisos, c. 561 - 546 B.C.

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King Kroisos minted the first silver and gold coins. He was famous for his extraordinary wealth, but with his defeat by Kyros in 546 B.C. Lydia became a Persian satrapy.
SH71650. Silver 1/3 stater, Berk 24; Traité I 412; SNG Kayhan -; SNGvA -; SNG Copenhagen -; Boston MFA 2071, VF, toned, bumps and marks, some corrosion, weight 3.421 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 561 - 546 B.C.; obverse confronted foreparts of roaring lion on right and bull on left, pellet over head of lion; reverse double incuse punch, larger punch on the side of the lion; $450.00 (€400.50)


Parion, Mysia, c. 5th Century B.C.

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Imitative of this type were struck in large numbers by the Thracian Odrysian Kingdom. The original coins from Parion are much scarcer and also more attractive.
GA76155. Silver hemidrachm, SNG BnF 1343; Traité II 1, 652, pl. XVI, 22; SNGvA 1318; Rosen 525; Asyut 612, VF, high relief, bold strike, porous, slightly off center, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, Parion mint, c. 5th century B.C.; obverse facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) with open mouth and protruding tongue; reverse incuse square containing an irregular cruciform pattern, with pellet in center; $150.00 (€133.50)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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The attribution of any of Alexander's or Lysimachus' coinage to Abydus is uncertain, however, the mint was definitely in the area near to Lampsacus.
GS85192. Silver drachm, Price 1565, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, SNG Saroglos -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered and struck on a broad flan, die wear, porosity, scrapes on edge, weight 4.167 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos(?) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, MY monogram within grain wreath (control symbol) left, head of Mithras with Phrygian cap (control symbol) below throne; rare; $240.00 (€213.60)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GS76147. Silver drachm, Price 1801, Müller Alexander 1336, SNG Alpha Bank 613, SNG Saroglos 1743, SNG Munchen -, Choice gVF, attractive type, dark toning, bumps and marks, weight 4.207 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - c. 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, B left, N under throne; $225.00 (€200.25)











Catalog current as of Thursday, August 17, 2017.
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Anatolia