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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman ProvincialView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.


Ainos, Thrace, c. 117 - 138 A.D.

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This extremely rare type is unpublished in references and missing from major collections. The only other example we know is the referenced example sold in Nomos obolos 7. Nomos dated the type c. 280 - 200 B.C. AMNG and RPC Online IV list a similar type with both Hermes and the goat right. RPC dates that type to the 2nd Century A.D. We believe the Hermes portrait is Augusticized and has some resemblance to Hadrian. We tentatively date the type to Hadrian's reign, c. 117 - 138 A.D.
GB86124. Bronze AE 18, Nomos obolos 7 (9 Jul 2017), lot 28 (same dies); cf. AMNG 403, pl. V.26 (rev.) (Hermes and goat right, etc.); RPC Online IV temp. 4495 (=AMNG 403), F/aF, well centered, bumps and marks, corrosion, porosity, centration dimple on reverse, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, c. 117 - 138 A.D.; obverse head of Hermes left, caduceus before, no centration dimple; reverse AI-NIΩN, goat standing left, centration dimple; unpublished in references, missing from major collections, extremely rare - 2nd known specimen; $200.00 (€170.00)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Miletos, Ionia

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The New Testament mentions Miletus as the site where the Apostle Paul in 57 A.D. met with the elders of the church of Ephesus near the close of his Third Missionary Journey, as recorded in Acts of the Apostles (Acts 20:15?38). It is believed that Paul stopped by the Great Harbor Monument and sat on its steps. He may have met the Ephesian elders there and then bid them farewell on the nearby beach. Miletus is also the city where Paul left Trophimus, one of his travel ling companions, to recover from an illness (2 Timothy 4:20). Because this cannot be the same visit as Acts 20 (in which Trophimus accompanied Paul all the way to Jerusalem, according to Acts 21:29), Paul must have made at least one additional visit to Miletus, perhaps as late as 65 or 66. Paul's previous successful three-year ministry in nearby Ephesus resulted in the evangelization of the entire province of Asia (see Acts 19:10, 20; 1 Corinthians 16:9). It is safe to assume that at least by the time of the apostle's second visit to Miletus, a fledgling Christian community was established in Miletus.
RP86540. Billon AE 22, RPC I 2710 (6 specimens); SNG Cop 1008; SNG Tübingen 3083; BMC Ionia p. 198, 147; SNGvA -; SNG München -, VF, attractive style, near black dark patina, scratches, reverse slightly off center, weight 5.875 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, 25 Jan 41 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ (counterclockwise behind), laureate head right, star of eight rays before; reverse male lion walking right on exergue line, head turned back left looking at star of eight rays above, MIΛH-ΣIΩN (starting in exergue, then counterclockwise on right); not even a single of auction recorded for this type on Coin Archives; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; extremely rare; $400.00 (€340.00)


The Perrhaiboi, Thessaly, Greece, c. Late 2nd - Early 1st Century B.C.

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The Perrhaiboi were a Pelasgian (indigenous non-Greek) tribal people who lived in Perrhaibia, north of Thessaly proper and bordering Macedonia. Their capital was Phalanna, and their most significant town was Olosson. In the Iliad, Homer wrote of "the valiant Perrhaiboi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona, and held the lands round the lovely river Titaresios, which sends its waters into the Peneus." The Perrhaiboi fought in the Battle of Thermopylae. Through most of their history they were overshadowed and controlled by Thessaly, although they had two votes at the Delphic Amphictyony. Philip II of Macedon took their kingdom and it remained under Macedonian control until the Roman conquest in 196 B.C.
GB76999. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly I 1247 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 561; Rogers 440, fig. 239; SNG Cop 197, HGC 4 157, aVF, well centered, some corrosion, weight 6.372 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Olosson or Phalanna mint, c. late 2nd - early 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right, wearing oak wreath; reverse ΠEPPAI/BΩN (in two lines, starting upward from lower left, ending downward on right), Hera seated right on backless throne, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, resting left hand on knee, no magistrate name or initials; $135.00 (€114.75)


Rhodos, Caria, c. 1 - 25 A.D.

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Although the radiate heads on coins of Rhodes are usually Helios, the wreath of ivy indicates this is Dionysos. Teimostratos was the first official named on the bronze coinage struck at Rhodes after Actium. His title, Treasurer (TAMIA), is unusual. The officials that followed at Rhodes were identified as Legate (EPI) in the inscriptions.
GB86523. Bronze drachm, RPC I 2748; SNG Keckman 759; SNG Cop 888; Ashton Early 107; Lindgren 700; BMC Caria p. 264, 377, F, broad flan, near black patina, earthen deposits, reverse double struck, porous, weight 25.209 g, maximum diameter 35.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodes mint, c. 1 - 25 A.D.; obverse radiate head of young Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath; reverse Rose seen in profile, small bud on tendril on each side of stem, poppy to left of stem, stalk of grain to right of stem, PO∆IΩN (Rhodos) above, TA-MIA / TEI-MO/CTP-ATOY (treasurer Teimostratos) in three lines divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Collossae, Phrygia, c 177 - 192 A.D.

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Colossae was on the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander River) 10 miles southeast of Laodicea, 13 miles from Hierapolis, and 3 miles from Mount Cadmus. In the 4th century B.C., Xenophon described it as one of six large cities of Phrygia. Antiochus the Great relocated two thousand Jewish families from Babylonia and Mesopotamia to Colossae. The city's commerce included trade in wool and woven fabric. It was known for its religious fusion (syncretism) of Jewish, Gnostic, and pagan influences, described in the first century A.D. as an angel-cult. The Apostle Paul addressed an epistle (letter) to the city's Christian community which addressed the cult and exalted the supremacy of Jesus Christ. The city was overrun by the Saracens in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. and ultimately destroyed by the Turks in the 12th century. As of 2015, it had never been excavated, but there are plans for an Australian-led expedition.
RP86524. Bronze AE 32, RPC Online temp 1899; vA Phrygiens II 496 - 505; SNGvA 3765; SNG Mün 307; SNG Hunt 1938; McClean III 8789; BMC Phrygia p. 155, 5 (all same dies?), F, broad flan, earthen deposits, porous, weight 19.959 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, Colossae mint, c. 177 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC - KOΛOCCHNΩ-N, laureate head of young Demos right; reverse Helios standing in galloping quadriga, facing, wearing radiate crown, globe in left hand, torch in right hand, KO-ΛOC/CH-NΩN in two divided lines below horses; ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $400.00 (€340.00)


Jerusalem or Tyre, 20 - 21 A.D., Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver

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Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver
"Then one of the 12, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests, and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for 30 pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15. Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ.

The Temple Tax Coin
"..go to the sea and cast a hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou has opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them [the temple tax collectors] for me and thee." Since the tax was one half shekel per man the coin would have to be a shekel to pay the tax for both Jesus and Peter. Matthew 17:24-27
SH86527. Silver shekel, RPC I 4659; Prieur 1419 (3 spec.); Cohen DCA 920; HGC 10 357; BMC Phoenicia p. 248, 200 - 201 var. (different monogram right), VF, toned, tight flan as typical for this issue, bumps and marks, weight 14.180 g, maximum diameter 25.0 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem or Tyre mint, 20 - 21 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle left, right foot on ship's ram, transverse palm frond on far side, letter between legs, PMς (year 146) and club left, KP over monogram right, uncertain Aramaic letter between eagle's legs; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $1450.00 (€1232.50)


Tyre, Phoenicia, 80 - 79 B.C., The Temple Tax Coin

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple.

At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were not always used in everyday commerce, but were the only coins accepted by the temple. Many taxpayers required a currency exchange, so money changers set up in the Temple court. Jesus found this business and their shouting (advertising rates) offensive, so he threw over their tables.
SH86530. Silver half shekel, HGC 10 358; Cohen DCA 921 (S); BMC Phoenicia p. 251, 226 var. (different monogram right); cf. Rouvier 2131 (this year and monogram, shekel), aVF, centered, toned, scrapes, edge chips and lamination defects, corrosion, rough, weight 5.430 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 80 - 79 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, ZM (year 47) over club left, ΦIΛ monogram right, Aramaic letter bet between legs; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $950.00 (€807.50)


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
JD86547. Bronze 1/8 shekel, Kadman III 37, Hendin 1369, Meshorer TJC 214, VF, well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 5.778 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, year 4, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse Omer cup with pearled rim; reverse bundle of lulav flanked by two ethrogs; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $580.00 (€493.00)


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

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Herod the Great, a Roman client king of Judea, has been described as a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis, prepared to commit any crime in order to gratify his unbounded ambition, and as the greatest builder in Jewish history. He is known for his colossal building projects throughout Judea, including his expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, the construction of the port at Caesarea Maritima, the fortress at Masada and Herodium. Vital details of his life are recorded in the works of the 1st century Roman-Jewish historian Josephus.
JD86529. Bronze 2 prutot, Hendin 1178a, Meshorer TJC 49, Sofaer Collection 19, RPC I 4905 var. (closed diadem), weight 2.187 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, c. 30 - 29 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (of King Herod), cross surrounded by open diadem; reverse tripod table, flat object upon it, flanked by palm branches; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $95.00 (€80.75)


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

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Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius. Antonius Felix was the procurator before whom St. Paul was brought for trial.
JD86532. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1348, Meshorer TJC 340, SGICV 5626, RPC I 4971, VF, highlighting earthen deposits, light corrosion, off center, weight 2.346 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two oblong shields and two spears crossed; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) flanking trunk; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $95.00 (€80.75)











Catalog current as of Friday, January 19, 2018.
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Roman Coins of Roman Provincial