Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Jun 20, 2017
Byzantine Coins
Medieval & Modern Coins
Budget & Wholesale

Jun 08, 2017
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman ProvincialView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.


Achaean League, Pallantion, Achaia, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 88 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
GS85328. Silver triobol or hemidrachm, Benner p. 86, 4; BMC Peloponnesus 124; BCD Peloponnesos 1593.2; McClean 6507; Clerk 219; SNG Cop 290; Hunterian 26; Dewing 1851; HGC 5 969 (R1), aVF, weight 2.085 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 225o, Pallantion (near Tripoli, Arcadia, Greece) mint, c. 88 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus left; reverse large Achaian League (AX) monogram, Π-A-Λ clockwise from left side, YE monogram and trident head upward below, all within laurel wreath; $140.00 (€124.60)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian, Tmolus, Lydia

Click for a larger photo
The primary reference for Tmolus is: Foss, C. "A neighbor of Sardis: the city of Tmolus and its successors" in Classical Antiquity, vol. 1, no. 2 (Oct. 1982), pp. 178-201, available online: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25010770

Foss wrote that the small city of Tmolus was first authorized to strike coins under Hadrian. He believed that Tmolus issued coinage only very sporadically and the coins were probably struck at the mint of their neighbor Sardis.
RP85354. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 2388 (5 spec.); SNG Cop 635; NC 1903, p. 337, 29 and pl. X, 12 rev.; Foss Tmolus p. 181, type I, VF, grainy surface, edge split, weight 4.542 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 190o, struck for Tmolus at Sardis(?) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CEBACTH CABEINA, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse TMΩΛITΩN, Apollo standing right, nude, bow in right hand, arrow in left hand; very rare; $200.00 (€178.00)


Iol-Caesarea, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 25 B.C. - 24 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Phoenicians from Carthage founded Iol as a trading station around 400 B.C. It became a part of the kingdom of Numidia under Jugurtha, c. 160 - 104 B.C. In 29 B.C., Roman emperor Augustus made the Numidian King Juba II and his wife Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Marc Antony and Cleopatra of Egypt) king and queen of Mauretania. The capital was established at Iol, which was renamed Caesarea in honor of the emperor.
GB85358. Bronze 1/4 Unit, Alexandropoulos MAA 147; Falbe-Lindberg III, p. 177, 290 (uncertain mint); SNG Cop 684 var. (kerykeion obv. left), F, dark green patina, tight flan, light corrosion, weight 2.102 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 270o, Iol-Caesarea (Cherchell, Algeria) mint, c. 25 B.C. - 24 A.D.; obverse head of Isis left, wearing vulture crown and horned solar-disk headdress; reverse three ears of barley; extremely rare; $180.00 (€160.20)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria

Click for a larger photo
On 11 February 244, Emperor Gordian III was murdered by mutinous soldiers in Zaitha (Mesopotamia). Philip the Arab (Marcus Julius Philippus) declared himself emperor and made a disgraceful peace with the Sasanian Empire, withdrawing from their territory and giving Shapur 500,000 gold pieces. The Sasanians occupied Armenia. Philip was recognized by the Roman Senate as Emperor and he nominated his son Philippus, age 6, as Caesar and heir to the throne. He gave his brother Priscus supreme power (rector Orientis) in the Eastern provinces; and began construction of the city of Shahba, Syria in the province of his birth.
RY85323. Billon tetradrachm, Prieur 321 (1 spec.); McAlee 889 (v. rare); BMC Galatia p. 212, 505, EF, sharp attractive portrait, attractive iridescent toning, parts of legends weak, areas of some porosity, weight 13.256 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, 244 A.D.; obverse AVTOK K M IOV Λ ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust left, from behind; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (tribune of the people), eagle standing slightly left on palm frond, wings open, head left, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; very rare; $350.00 (€311.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt, Portrait of Galba

Click for a larger photo
This type was struck at the beginning of Vespasian's reign. The portrait resembles Galba because it was struck before the mint had a portrait of the new Emperor.

In Greek mythology, Nilus was a son of Oceanus and Tethys. He was the god of the Nile River, equivalent to the Egyptian god Hapy.
RX85349. Bronze hemidrachm, Dattari 396, Geissen 271, BMC Alexandria p. 32, 269; Emmett 211 (R4), F, dark glossy surfaces, scratches, light encrustations, weight 12.426 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, Jul 69 - 28 Aug 69 A.D.; obverse AYT TIT ΦΛAYIO YEΣΠAΣIAN KAIΣ, laureate head right, portrait resembling Galba; reverse bust of Nilus right, wreathed with papyrus, cornucopia on left shoulder, date LA (year 1) before; very rare; $200.00 (€178.00)


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, 229 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Durrës, one of the oldest cities in Albania, was founded as Epidamnos in 627 B.C. by colonists from Corinth and Corcyra. Located around a rocky harbor, surrounded by inland swamps and high cliffs, the city was difficult to attack from land or sea. After its defeat to Rome in 229 B.C., the new rulers renamed the city Dyrrachium. Epidamnos is similar to the Latin damnum, meaning "loss." Dyrrhachion is Greek for "bad spine" or "difficult ridge," likely referring to the nearby cliffs. Dyrrachium prospered under Rome and was made a naval and military base. Pompey made a stand there in 48 B.C. before fleeing south to Greece. Augustus made the city a colony for veterans of his legions following the Battle of Actium, proclaiming it a civitas libera (free town).
GS12075. Silver drachm, Ceka 374; BMC Thessaly p. 73, 118; SNG Munchen 433; SNG Cop -, VF, obverse slightly off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.369 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, 229 - 100 B.C.; obverse ΠEPIΓENHΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, head of Isis right above, grain over cluster of grapes right; reverse ∆YP − ΦA−NIΣ−KOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square; rare; $200.00 (€178.00)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt, Ancient Counterfeit

Click for a larger photo
J. G. Milne wrote in 1933, "There are scarcely any counterfeits or forgeries of Alexandrian coins in existence, other than those made in modern times." This is an ancient counterfeit Alexandrian tetradrachm of Nero struck with unofficial dies shared with counterfeit coins published by William Metcalf in "Two Alexandrian Hoards." The first of the two hoards, a "Hoard of Forgeries from Luxor" was acquired by E. T. Newell at Luxor in March, 1908. The American Numismatic Society Collection includes 76 pieces from the hoard. The counterfeits were probably struck c. 138 A.D., the date of the latest official prototype imitated in the hoard. The die combination of our coin is upublished.
RX85240. Billon tetradrachm, Metcalf Two, part 1. A Hoard of Forgeries from Luxor, Obv. IV / Rev. 8 (unlisted die combination); cf. Dattari 246, RPC I 5293 (official, Alexandria), VF, attractive dark toning, well centered and struck on a tight flan, weight 13.386 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, unoffical counterfeiter's mint, c. 138 A.D.; obverse NEo KΛΛV KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEPM, radiate bust right, wearing aegis; reverse AVTO KPΛ, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Roma right, L IΓ (year 13 = 29 Aug 66 - 28 Aug 67 A.D.) to right; very rare; $580.00 (€516.20)


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Philadelphia, Lydia

Click for a larger photo
Vipsania Agrippina, also known as Agrippina Major, Agrippina Senior, or Agrippina I, was the wife of Germanicus and Caligula's mother. She was the granddaughter of Augustus, the daughter of his daughter Julia. She was the sister-in-law, stepdaughter, and daughter-in-law of Tiberius. She was the maternal second cousin and sister-in-law of Claudius and the maternal grandmother of Nero.
RP84954. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 3032; BMC Lydia p. 195, 55; SNG Cop 372, VF, nice dark patina, scratches, reverse slightly off center, weight 4.126 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Philadelphia (Alasehir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Artemon Hermogenous; obverse ΓAIOC KAICAP ΓEPMANIKOC NEOKAICAPEΩN, laureate head right; reverse AΓPIΠΠINA APRTEMΩN EPMOΓENOYC, Agrippina (as Demeter?) seated right, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 43, lot 708; rare; $160.00 (€142.40)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., with Agrippina Junior

Click for a larger photo
Ephesos, on the west coast of Anatolia, was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League. It was famous for its Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C., one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The cult image of the Ephesian goddess has a mummy-like body with the feet placed close together, is many-breasted, and from each of her hands hangs a long fillet with tassels at the ends. At her side stands a stag, raising its head to the image of the goddess. The usual symbols of this nature-goddess are the torch, stag, and the bee. Coins of Ephesos most frequently depict a bee on the obverse. The high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called King Bee, while the virgin priestesses were called honey-bees (Melissae). Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia cited in the Book of Revelation and the Gospel of John may have been written there.
GB85247. Bronze assarion, Karwiese MvE 5.2 Claudius & Agrippina O19/R68; RPC I 2622; SNG Cop 371; SNGvA 1877; BMC Ionia p. 73, 203, F, weight 5.307 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 225o, Ephesos mint, c. 49 - 50 A.D.; obverse jugate heads right of Claudius, laureate, and Agrippina, draped; reverse stag standing right, EΦE/ΣIΩN in two lines above; $85.00 (€75.65)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., with Agrippina Junior

Click for a larger photo
Ephesos, on the west coast of Anatolia, was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League. It was famous for its Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C., one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The cult image of the Ephesian goddess has a mummy-like body with the feet placed close together, is many-breasted, and from each of her hands hangs a long fillet with tassels at the ends. At her side stands a stag, raising its head to the image of the goddess. The usual symbols of this nature-goddess are the torch, stag, and the bee. Coins of Ephesos most frequently depict a bee on the obverse. The high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called King Bee, while the virgin priestesses were called honey-bees (Melissae). Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia cited in the Book of Revelation and the Gospel of John may have been written there.
GB85248. Bronze assarion, Karwiese MvE 5.2 Claudius & Agrippina O27/R70; RPC I 2624; SNG Cop 373; BMC Ionia p. 73, 205; Weber 2875; SNG München -; SNGvA -, F, dark green patina, weight 6.476 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 49 - 50 A.D.; obverse jugate heads right of Claudius, laureate, and Agrippina, draped; reverse stag standing right, KOYΣI/NIOΣ (Causinius, magistrate) in two lines above, o/T monogram left, ∆ right, EΦE below; $115.00 (€102.35)











Catalog current as of Friday, June 23, 2017.
Page created in 1.669 seconds
Roman Coins of Roman Provincial