Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 29 JUNE Layaway and reserve are not available during the sale Shop NOW and save! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 29 JUNE Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958 Shop NOW and save!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Jun 21, 2018

Jun 20, 2018

Jun 19, 2018

Jun 18, 2018

Jun 16, 2018

Jun 15, 2018

Jun 14, 2018

Jun 13, 2018

Jun 12, 2018

Jun 11, 2018

Jun 09, 2018

Jun 08, 2018

Jun 07, 2018

Jun 06, 2018

Jun 05, 2018

Jun 04, 2018

Jun 03, 2018
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and DeclineView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the 3rd Century Crisis and Decline of the Roman Empire

Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS86824. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 235 (R), RSC 38, Bland 89 (33 spec.), SRCV III 9269, Hunter III - (xciv), gVF, bold full circles strike, light toning, surface flaws, weight 4.583 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 249 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P VI COS P P (high priest, holder of tribune power for six year, consul, father of the country), Felicitas standing left, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Beast Coins; rare; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The Persians occupied part of Syria in 251 A.D. and took and burned Antioch in 256 A.D. and again in 260 A.D.
RS86825. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 108k (also IV both sides), RIC IV 89 (S), SRCV III 9647, Hunter III - (p. cvi), VF, well centered, toned, radiating flow lines, die wear, some porosity, weight 3.838 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, tiny IV (officina) below; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE AVG, Roma seated left on shield, Victory in right hand, spear in left hand; Victory is standing on globe, holding palm frond in left hand, and presenting wreath with right hand; IV (officina) in exergue; ex Beast Coins; scarce; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RS86827. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 218d, RSC IV 48, Hunter V 8, SRCV III 9240, EF, excellent portrait, detailed reverse, well centered and struck on a broad oval flan, light tone, flan crack, weight 3.598 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 244 - 246 A.D.; obverse M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENT (to the Prince of Youth), Philip II standing slightly left, head left, wearing military dress, globe in extended right hand, inverted spear in left hand; ex Beast Coins; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Roman people, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other. The legend GENIVS ILLVRICIANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the army in Illyria (western Balkans).
RS86829. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 38a (S), RSC 43, Hunter III 23, SRCV III 9373, VF, excellent portrait, uneven toning, radiating flow lines, some die wear, bumps and marks, edge crack, weight 3.333 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, c. 250 - 251 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE TRA DEC AVG, radiate, draped, head right, from behind; reverse GEN ILLVRICI, Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for kalathos (or polos) on head and paludamentum over shoulders and left arm, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Beast Coins; very scarce; $95.00 SALE PRICE $85.50


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 248, Trajan Decius put down the revolts of Pacatianus in Moesia and Iotapianus in Syria. In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched to Verona, where his forces defeated and killed Philip the Arab.
RS86809. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 7, RSC IV 145, Hunter III 40, SRCV III 8949, EF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck, toned, reverse die wear and minor damage, edge slightly ragged, weight 4.279 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 30o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P V COS III P P, Marti Pacifero (Mars the Pacifier) standing left, wearing helmet and military garb, raising olive branch in right hand, supporting grounded shield with left hand, grounded inverted spear leaning on left arm, A (1st officina) left; ex Beast Coins; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 248, Trajan Decius put down the revolts of Pacatianus in Moesia and Iotapianus in Syria. In 249, after his legionaries proclaimed him emperor, Trajan Decius marched to Verona, where his forces defeated and killed Philip the Arab.
RS86810. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 8 corr. (officina Z in error), RSC IV 98, Hunter III 41, SRCV III 8938, VF, well centered, light rose tone, obv. double struck, rev. legend not fully struck, edge cracks, weight 3.815 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse NOBILITAS AVGG, Nobilitas standing facing, head right, long scepter vertical in right hand, globe in left hand hand, ς (6th officina) left; ex Beast Coins; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 248, overwhelmed by the number of invasions and usurpers, Philip offered to resign. The Senate decided to support the Emperor, with Gaius Messius Quintus Decius most vocal of all the senators. Philip was so impressed that he dispatched Decius with a special command of the Pannonian and Moesian provinces. His loyal supporter, Decius, was, however, proclaimed Emperor by the Danubian armies in the spring of 249 and defeated and killed Philip in September.
RS86811. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 9, RSC IV 223, Hunter III 42, SRCV III 8968, F, well centered, weight 3.130 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 135o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse TRANQVILLITAS AVGG, Tranquillitas standing facing, head left, capricorn in right hand, scepter in left hand, B (2nd officina) lower left; ex Beast Coins; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Lucifer means lightbringer, from the Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bear or bring." "Lucifer" is found in only one place in the Bible, Isaiah 14:12, but only in the King James and related versions: "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! The King James Version is based on the Vulgate, the Latin translation of Jerome. Jerome translated the Hebrew helel (bright or brilliant one) as "lucifer," which was a reasonable Latin equivalent. And yet it is this lucifer, the bright one or lightbearer, that became a name for Satan, Lord of Darkness.
RS86813. Silver denarius, RIC IV 127 RSC IV 69, Hunter III 47, SRCV III 8673, EF, well centered and struck on a broad flan, rose tone, light deposits, some porosity, ragged flan edge, weight 2.774 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, issued for wedding to Tranquillina, 241 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing right, lit long transverse torch right in both hands; ex Beast Coins; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume III, David Sear notes this type was issued for the wedding of Gordian and Tranquillina.

Under Gordian III the same coin types were often struck at both Rome and Antioch. One way to distinguish Gordian's coins struck at Antioch from those struck at Rome is the shape of the letter M. On coins from Antioch, M usually resembles a V in the middle of two I's, thus IVI. From the Rome mint, M normally resembles two lambdas, thus ΛΛ.
RS86828. Silver denarius, RIC IV 130 (R), RSC IV 340, Hunter III 65, SRCV III 8682, VF, well centered, struck with worn dies, small edge cracks, weight 2.567 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 80o, Rome mint, issued for wedding to Tranquillina, 241 - 242 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRITAS PVBLICA (security of the public), Securitas seated left on throne, at ease, transverse scepter in right hand, propping head with left hand; ex Beast Coins; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Anazarbus, Cilicia

Click for a larger photo
Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire, it was known as Caesarea. It was the Metropolis (capital) of Late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Eastern Roman emperor Justin I after an earthquake, it became Justinopolis in 525. In late 1097 or early 1098 it was captured by the armies of the First Crusade and was incorporated into Bohemond's Principality of Antioch. The old native name persisted, and when Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva. The Mamluk Kingdom of Egypt finally destroyed the city in 1374.
RP87142. Bronze AE 26, Ziegler An 725 (Vs1/Rs3,= ANSCD 1944.100.53084); SNG BnF 2118 (same dies); SNG Pfšlzer 234 (same); BMC Lycaonia p. 37, 34; SNG Levante -, gF, full circles centering on a broad flan, light deposits/encrustations, light corrosion, weight 9.926 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus mint, as caesar, 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse bare headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ANAZAPBOV MHTPOΠ, capricorn left above globe on exergue line, ET ΓΞC (year 263) in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics esale 39 (26 Aug 2017), 482; very rare; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00











Catalog current as of Saturday, June 23, 2018.
Page created in 1.284 seconds.
Crisis and Decline