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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian EraView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman coins of the Constantinian Era

City of Rome Commemorative, 330 - 335 A.D.

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RL85736. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 12 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Nicomedia 195 (R1), SRCV IV 16521, LRBC I 1120 corr. (dots omitted), Cohen VII 17, VF, tight flan, corrosion/porosity, weight 2.655 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 330 - 335 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, three vertically aligned dots between two stars above, SMNS in exergue; scarce; $50.00 (42.50)


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 333 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL85740. Bronze reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 12 (also 4th officina), RIC VII Thessalonica 188, LRBC I 839, SRCV IV 16470, Cohen VII 22, VF, well centered, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 2.433 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 330 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLI, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, SMTS∆ in exergue; $15.64 (13.29)


City of Rome Commemorative, 336 - 337 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL86259. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Alexandria 70 (R2), SRCV IV 16528, LRBC I 1440, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V 19 var. (3rd officina), VF, rough, corrosion, reverse a little off center, weight 1.843 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 315o, 4th officina, Alexandria mint, 336 - 337 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, SMAL∆ in exergue; $18.00 (15.30)


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 333 - 335 A.D.

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Constantinople Commemoratives minted by the actual city of Constantinople mint are much scarcer than those minted by other Eastern mints.
RL85615. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 79 (R4); LRBC I 1014; SRCV IV 16474; Cohen VII 21; Hunter V -, Choice VF, well centered, nice style, black patina with red earthen highlighting, weight 1.968 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, 7th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 333 - 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLI, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, CONSZ in exergue; ex Zurqieh (UAE, 2011); rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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On 8 October 314, Constantine the Great defeated Licinius in the Battle of Cibalae, near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace and fled to Sirmium. Peace negotiations were initiated, but unsuccessful.
RL86258. Billon follis, Hunter V 180 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Rome 19, SRCV IV 16096, Cohen VII 536, VF, well centered, some silvering, weak centers, scratches, some porosity, tiny encrustations, weight 3.103 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 314 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, R - F flanking at sides, R*S in exergue; $50.00 (42.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Constantine reorganized the Roman army to consist of mobile field units and garrison soldiers capable of countering internal threats and barbarian invasions. Constantine pursued successful campaigns against the tribes on the Roman frontiers - the Franks, the Alamanni, the Goths, and the Sarmatians - even resettling territories abandoned by his predecessors during the turmoil of the previous century.
RL86260. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 407 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Antioch 86, LRBC I 1356, SRCV IV 16359, VF/F, centered on a tight flan, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 1.785 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 330 - 333 and 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, SMAN∆ in exergue; $7.49 (6.37)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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On 3 July 324, at Adrianople, Constantine defeated Licinius forcing him to retreat to Byzantium. Crispus destroyed Licinius' fleet at the Battle of Hellespont in the Dardanelles, allowing his father to cross over the Bosporus and besiege Licinius. On 18 September, Constantine I decisively defeated Licinius at the Battle of Chrysopolis and became sole emperor.
RL86265. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Cyzicus 24, LRBC I 1158, Cohen VII 454, SRCV IV 16261, Hunter V 361 - 362 var. (officina), VF, well centered and struck, obverse a little rough, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.123 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 324 - 325 A.D.; obverse CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (to the foresight of the two emperors), campgate with two turrets, star above, SMK∆ in exergue; $28.00 (23.80)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Lyon was originally founded as the Roman city Colonia Copia Felix Munatia, a name invoking prosperity and the blessing of the gods. The city became increasingly referred to as Lugdunum by the end of the 1st century A.D. The etymology of Lugdunum is a Latinization of the Gaulish place name Lugodunon. While dunon means hill fort, the source of Lug is uncertain. The most commonly offered meaning is the Celtic god named Lug. During the Middle Ages, Lugdunum was transformed to Lyon by natural sound change.
RL86374. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 225 (S), LRBC I 169, Bastien 184, SRCV IV 16242, Cohen VII 454, Hunter V -, Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, traces of silvering, attractive surfaces, small closed edge crack, weight 3.283 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 324 - 325 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (to the foresight of the two emperors), camp gate with two turrets, six stone layers, star above, PLC in exergue; $150.00 (127.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RL85638. Billon half follis, RIC VII Trier 897 (S), SRCV IV 16156, Cohen VII 323, Hunter V -, aEF, some silvering, full circle centering on obverse, die wear reverse slightly off center, some porosity, weight 1.842 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 310 - 311 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARTI CONSERV (Mars the Protector), Mars standing half right, helmeted, nude but for paludamentum over shoulders, inverted spear in right hand, left hand on grounded shield at side, PTR in exergue; rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT85649. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 15 (R2), SRCV IV 15940, Cohen VII 289 corr. (rev. misdescribed), Hunter V 245 var. (2nd officina), Choice EF, well centered, sharp portrait, much silvering, small scrape on reverse, couple letters on obverse and Zeus' head weakly struck, edge crack, weight 3.339 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 315 - 316 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for paludamentum on left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand presenting wreath, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle at feet on left facing left with head turned back right and wreath in beak, ∆ right, SIS in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (102.00)











Catalog current as of Friday, January 19, 2018.
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Constantinian Era