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Roman coins of the Constantinian Era

Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

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VOT V MVLT X abbreviates Votis Quinquennalibus Multis Decennalibus. Earlier in the empire, this inscription would have meant that Julian had completed his vows (prayers) to thank the gods on the fifth anniversary of his rule, and made more vows to the gods that they might help him achieve his tenth anniversary. Jovian ruled less than one year. This votive inscription clearly expressed hope for the future rather than an advertisement of current events.
RL86649. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Heraclea 110 (S), LRBC II 1913, Cohen VIII 34, SRCV V 19231, VF, well centered on a tight flan, porous, light scratches, edge cracks, weight 2.772 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 17 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse VOT V MVLT X within wreath, jewel at the top, tied at the bottom, HERACA in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Triton VIII (10 Jan 2005), part of lot 2095; scarce; $95.00 (€80.75)


Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

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From the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Triton VIII (10 Jan 2005), part of lot 2095.

In 363, the Council of Laodicea, which deals with constricting the conduct of church members, is held. The major canon approved by this council is Canon 29, which prohibits resting on the Sabbath (Saturday), restricting Christians to honoring the Lord on Sunday.
RL86657. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Siscia 426, LRBC II 1267, SRCV V 19228, Cohen VIII 35, VF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off mintmark, edge a bit ragged, weight 2.857 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 17 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT / V / MVLT / X, in four lines within wreath with jewel at the top and tied at the bottom, BSISC in exergue; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Triton VIII (10 Jan 2005), part of lot 2095; $70.00 (€59.50)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

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Strabo wrote, "The Romans possess Lugdunum, founded below a ridge at the confluence of the Arar and the Rhone. It is the most populous of all the other cities except Narbo; for it is a center of commerce, and the Roman emperors strike their silver and gold coinage there." (4.3.2). Dates of operation: 15 B.C. - c. 90 A.D., 195 - 196, and c. 254 - 423. Mintmarks: LG, LVG
RT85637. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Lyons 126, LRBC II 221, Bastien Lyon 174, SRCV V 18820, Hunter V 43 var. (pellet above SV), EF, dark toned silvered surfaces, well centered on a tight flan, die wear, tiny edge chip, slightest porosity, weight 5.201 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 18 Jan 350 - 351 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE (victories of our lords, Emperor and Caesar), two Victories holding wreath containing VOT V MVLT X, SV below, RPLG in exergue; $160.00 (€136.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL85661. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, aEF, well centered, light encrustations, edge flaw, weight 5.475 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind (appearing as H, as common in this period), star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left (appearing as H), •ESIS• in exergue; scarce; $110.00 (€93.50)


Delmatius, Caesar, 18 September 335 - mid 337 A.D.

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In 337 A.D., Constantine II, Constantius II, and Constans succeeded their father Constantine I and ruled as co-emperors. The Roman Empire was divided between the three Augusti. A number of descendants of Constantius Chlorus, including the caesar Delmatius, as well as officials of the Roman Empire, were executed. The three Augusti denied responsibility for the purge.
RL86912. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Cyzicus 132, LRBC I 1269, SRCV IV 16900, Cohen VII 8, aF, weight 1.032 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 336 - mid 337 A.D.; obverse FL DELMATIVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, flanking a standard in center, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, SMKE in exergue; $12.00 (€10.20)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

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On 3 June 350, Iulius Nepotianus proclaimed himself emperor and entered Rome with a group of gladiators. On 30 June, Marcellinus, a trusted general of Magnentius, defeated and killed Nepotian. Nepotian's head was put on a lance and paraded around Rome.
RT85636. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Trier 271, LRBC II 55, Bastien MM 32, SRCV V 18798, Cohen VIII 20, Hunter V 20, EF, well centered on a tight flan, attractive coppery surfaces, light marks, areas of slight porosity, weight 4.149 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 18 Jan 350 - spring 351 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed "heavy" bust right, A behind; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM (glory of the Romans), Magnentius in military dress galloping right, shield on left arm, spearing a barbarian before horse kneeling left with outstretched hands, shield and broken spear on the ground below horse, TRS followed by a crescent in exergue; $200.00 (€170.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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In 331 A.D., Constantine I vigorously promoted Christianity, confiscating the property and valuables of a number of pagan temples throughout the Empire.
RL79166. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 526 (S), LRBC I 54, SRCV IV 16334, Cohen VII 254, EF, mint luster, die wear, weight 2.540 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS (glory of the army), two soldiers standing facing, heads turned inward confronted, two standards in center between them, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on grounded shield, TRP• in exergue; $50.00 (€42.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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On 8 October 314, Constantine the Great defeated Licinius in the Battle of Cibalae, near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace and fled to Sirmium. Peace negotiations were initiated, but unsuccessful.
RL86258. Billon follis, Hunter V 180 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Rome 19, SRCV IV 16096, Cohen VII 536, VF, well centered, some silvering, weak centers, scratches, some porosity, tiny encrustations, weight 3.103 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 314 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INVICTO COMITI (to the unconquered Sun, minister [of the Emperor]), Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, R - F flanking at sides, R*S in exergue; $50.00 (€42.50)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RT85649. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 15 (R2), SRCV IV 15940, Cohen VII 289 corr. (rev. misdescribed), Hunter V 245 var. (2nd officina), Choice EF, well centered, sharp portrait, much silvering, small scrape on reverse, couple letters on obverse and Zeus' head weakly struck, edge crack, weight 3.339 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 315 - 316 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for paludamentum on left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand presenting wreath, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle at feet on left facing left with head turned back right and wreath in beak, ∆ right, •SIS• in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (€102.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

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Because of his fame and because he was proclaimed Emperor while he was in Roman Britain, later Britons regarded Constantine as a king of their own people. In the 12th century, Henry of Huntingdon included a passage in his Historia Anglorum that Constantine's mother Helena was a Briton, the daughter of King Cole of Colchester. Geoffrey of Monmouth expanded this story in his highly fictionalized Historia Regum Britanniae, an account of the supposed Kings of Britain from their Trojan origins to the Anglo-Saxon invasion. According to Geoffrey, Cole was King of the Britons when Constantius, here a senator, came to Britain. Afraid of the Romans, Cole submitted to Roman law so long as he retained his kingship. However, he died only a month later, and Constantius took the throne himself, marrying Cole's daughter Helena. They had their son Constantine, who succeeded his father as King of Britain before becoming Roman Emperor. Historically, this series of events is extremely improbable. Constantius had already left Helena by the time he left for Britain. Additionally, no earlier source mentions that Helena was born in Britain, let alone that she was a princess.
RL85732. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Arles 264 (R2), SRCV IV 16243, Cohen VII 454, Hunter V -, Choice VF, well centered and struck, glossy dark sea-green patina, cleaning marks, weight 2.862 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, 324 - 325 A.D.; obverse CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (to the foresight of the two emperors), campgate with two turrets, star above, P*AR in exergue; $80.00 (€68.00)











Catalog current as of Tuesday, April 24, 2018.
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Constantinian Era