Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Recent Additions

Oct 21, 2017

Oct 20, 2017

Oct 19, 2017
Medieval & Modern Coins

Oct 17, 2017

Oct 16, 2017

Oct 15, 2017

Oct 13, 2017

Oct 12, 2017

Oct 11, 2017

Oct 10, 2017

Oct 09, 2017
Asian Coins

Oct 06, 2017
Asian Coins

Oct 05, 2017
Asian Coins

Oct 04, 2017

Oct 03, 2017
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive EmperorsView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors

Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 168, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus left Rome, establish their headquarters at Aquileia. The Roman army crossed the Alps into Pannonia and subdued the Marcomanni at Carnuntum north of the Danube.
RS85668. Silver denarius, RIC III 595, BMCRE IV 481, RSC II 318, SRCV II 5362, gVF, well centered, light toning, light marks, small die break on obverse, deposits on reverse, weight 3.482 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 168 A.D.; obverse L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right; reverse TR P VIII IMP V COS III, Aequitas seated left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex CNG e-auction 287 (26 Sep 2012), lot 437; $180.00 (€153.00)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

Click for a larger photo
On 7 March 161, Antoninus Pius died and was succeeded by Marcus Aurelius who shared imperial power with Lucius Verus. Marcus retained the title Pontifex Maximus. Pontifex Maximus (Latin literally meaning "greatest bridge-maker") was the high priest of the College of Pontiffs and the most important position in the ancient Roman religion. This title was retained by the emperors of Rome until 17 December 384 when it was relinquished to Pope Siricius by the Roman Emperor Gratian.
RS86223. Silver denarius, RIC III AP508a, RSC II 184, BMCRE IV AP1092, Hunter II 16, SRCV II 4704, Choice gVF, well centered and struck, toned, some reverse die wear, edge cracks, weight 3.060 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under Antoninus Pius, c. 152 - 156 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA AVG PII F, draped bust right, hair waved and drawn back into coiled bun at the back; reverse PVDICITIA, Pudicitia (modesty and chastity) standing left, veiled and draped, with right hand dropping incense on flaming altar, left hand at side; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 58, part of lot 811; scarce; $140.00 (€119.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS86225. Silver denarius, Woytek 270b, RIC II 128, RSC II 74, BMCRE III 328, Strack I 128, SRCV II 3129, Choice VF, well centered and struck, weight 3.030 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 107 - 108 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Victory standing slightly left, naked to hips, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 58, part of lot 811; $160.00 (€136.00)


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In late summer or fall of 161, Vologases IV of Parthia captured the Roman client Kingdom of Armenia, expelled its king and installed his own; Pacorus, an Arsacid like himself. In 162, Lucius Verus began the war to recover Armenia and exact vengeance for Parthia's invasions of Armenia and Syria. The Armenian capital Artaxata was recovered in 163. At the end of 163, Verus took the title Armeniacus, despite having never personally seen combat. Marcus Aurelius initially declined to accept the title, but accepted it in 164.
RS85602. Silver denarius, RIC III 491, RSC II156, BMCRE IV 229, Hunter II 8, SRCV II 5354, Choice EF, well centered bold strike, attractive portrait, excellent reverse detail, some luster, small edge cracks, weight 3.210 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 162 - 163 A.D.; obverse IMP L VERVS AVG, bare head right; reverse PROV DEOR TR P III COS II (to the providence of the gods, holder of Tribunitian power for 3 years, consul 2 times), Providentia standing half left, globe in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $220.00 (€187.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Libertas (Latin for Liberty) was the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. coins.
RB85888. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 916a, Cohen II 535, BMCRE IV 1944, Banti 221, SRCV II 4191, aVF, nice portrait, attractive toned brass surfaces, tight flan, light marks, weight 29.787 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 153 - 154 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS COS IIII, Libertas standing facing, head right, raising pileus in right, extending left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; $150.00 (€127.50)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Hadrian's galley reverse types refer to his return to Rome by sea from his travels to the provinces.
RB85872. Copper as, RIC II 673d (S), Hunter II 422, BMCRE III 1342, SRCV II 3682, Cohen II 446 var. (no drapery), VF/F, centered on a tight flan, corrosion, scrapes on reverse, weight 8.824 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 125 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, galley right with rowers; ram, acrostolium, and vexillum (or furled sail) at prow; rudder and arched cabin at stern; S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (€68.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

Click for a larger photo
Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP85017. Silver drachm, RPC III 3004 (21 spec.); Sydenham Caesarea 196; BMC Galatia p. 55, 69; SNG Fitzwilliam 5435; Metcalf Cappadocia 64c & Hoard 314-333, pl. 17-18, aVF/VF, light tone, centered on an oval flan, small edge cracks, porous, weight 6.732 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 112 - 114 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate and draped bust right; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠATO ς (consul 6 times), bust of Artemis left, in chiton, spear upward in right hand, phiale in left hand; $190.00 (€161.50)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

Click for a larger photo
Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP84828. Bronze AE 17, Varbanov III 3225 (R4); AMNG III / 2 p. 42, 83; SNG Hunterian 775; SNG Cop 107; SNG ANS 191; BMC Macedonia p. 57, 112; SGICV 1720, VF, legends weak, encrustations, flan flaws obverse right, corrosion, weight 4.313 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, 146 - winter 175/176 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right, hair in a braided bun at the back; reverse AMΦI−ΠO−ΛE−ITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, bow in left hand extended before her, drawing arrow from quiver at shoulder with right hand; ex Alex G. Malloy; $80.00 (€68.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Struck at Rome for Use in Syria

Click for a larger photo
In 115 A.D., while Trajan was in Antioch, during his war against Parthia, the city was convulsed by a huge earthquake. The emperor was forced to take shelter in the circus for several days. Trajan and his successor restored the city, but the population was reduced to less than 400,000 inhabitants and many sections of the city were abandoned.
RY85366. Bronze chalkous, half-quadrans, RPC online III 3682; McAlee 527; Woytek 939f; BMCRE III 1075A corr. (no cuirass), Choice VF, highlighting desert patina, weight 1.098 g, maximum diameter 12.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 116 A.D.; obverse no legend, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse large S C in wreath; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 35, lot 470; very rare; $160.00 (€136.00)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Antioch, Syria

Click for a larger photo
In 115 A.D., while Trajan was in Antioch, during his war against Parthia, the city was convulsed by a huge earthquake. The emperor was forced to take shelter in the circus for several days. Trajan and his successor restored the city, but the population was reduced to less than 400,000 inhabitants and many sections of the city were abandoned.
RY84893. Bronze as, McAlee 487(k); Dura 1643; cf. BMC Galatia p. 184, 270 (A); SNG Cop 203 (IΓ), gVF, green patina, tight flan, adjustment marks, bumps and scratches, light corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 14.746 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 102 - 114 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIA-NOC CEB ΓEPM ∆AK, laureate head right; reverse large S C, AI below, all within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 28, lot 256; scarce; $115.00 (€97.75)











Catalog current as of Sunday, October 22, 2017.
Page created in 2.387 seconds.
Adoptive Emperors