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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Adoptive EmperorsView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the Adoptive Emperors

Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The elaborate Annona reverse composition reflects the special care Commodus took in supplying the much needed African grain to Rome (in fear of mob uprisings).
RS84978. Silver denarius, RIC III 95, RSC II 17, BMCRE IV 144, MIR 18 647, SRCV II 5627, Hunter II -, Choice VF, nice portrait, well centered, reverse die wear, edge cracks, weight 3.212 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 184 - 185 A.D.; obverse COMM ANT AVG P BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P VIIII IMP VII COS IIII P P, Annona standing left, statuette of Concordia holding patera and scepter in Annona's right hand, scepter in her left hand, modius overflowing with grain at feet on left, two persons on prow at feet on right, ANN in exergue; $150.00 (€133.50)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RB85312. Copper as, RIC III 569a, Cohen II 578, BMCRE IV 1168, Hunter II 166, SRCV II 4903, F, attractive portrait, well centered, light corrosion, weight 11.765 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 139 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse TR POT COS II (tribune of the people, consul for the 2nd time), Pax standing left, branch downward in extended in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, PAX in exergue; $80.00 (€71.20)


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian, Tmolus, Lydia

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The primary reference for Tmolus is: Foss, C. "A neighbor of Sardis: the city of Tmolus and its successors" in Classical Antiquity, vol. 1, no. 2 (Oct. 1982), pp. 178-201, available online: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25010770

Foss wrote that the small city of Tmolus was first authorized to strike coins under Hadrian. He believed that Tmolus issued coinage only very sporadically and the coins were probably struck at the mint of their neighbor Sardis.
RP85354. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online III 2388 (5 spec.); SNG Cop 635; NC 1903, p. 337, 29 and pl. X, 12 rev.; Foss Tmolus p. 181, type I, VF, grainy surface, edge split, weight 4.542 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 190o, struck for Tmolus at Sardis(?) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CEBACTH CABEINA, draped bust right, wearing stephane; reverse TMΩΛITΩN, Apollo standing right, nude, bow in right hand, arrow in left hand; very rare; $200.00 (€178.00)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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In 168 A.D., Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus established their headquarters at Aquileia. They then crossed the Alps into Pannonia and, with paid help from German tribes and the Scythians, subdued the Marcomanni who had invaded Italy in 167.
RS84957. Silver denarius, RIC III 191, RSC II 899, BMCRE IV 467, MIR 18 165-4/30, Hunter II -, SRCV II -, gVF, nice portrait, well centered, edge cracks, weight 3.075 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 167 - Dec 168 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head right; reverse TR P XXII IMP V COS III, Aequitas seated left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $160.00 (€142.40)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Roman people, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc.
RS85126. Silver denarius, Woytek 518, Hunter II 176, RIC II 347, RSC II 276, BMCRE III 549, SRCV II 3149, VF, centered on a tight flan, bumps, scratches, tiny pitting, weight 3.059 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 114 - 117 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GERM DAC, laureate and draped bust right; reverse P M TR P COS VI P P S P Q R (high priest, tribune of the people, consul six times, father of the country, the senate and the Roman people), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude, patera in right hand, large heads of grain in left downward in left hand; $125.00 (€111.25)


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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"Nerva maintained that he had liberated Rome from the tyranny of Domitian and restored a constitutionally-based regime." -- David Van Meter
RS85129. Silver denarius, RIC II 19, RSC II 113, BMCRE III 46, Hunter I 22, SRCV II -, gF/F, toned, weight 3.192 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing half left, pileus in right hand, rod pointing up slightly right in left hand; $150.00 (€133.50)


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

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Sulla in a dream first saw Venus with the weapons of Mars as Venus Victrix and made her his personal patroness. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 B.C. Pompey dreamed of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign. Caesar sacrificed to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompey!
RS85213. Silver denarius, RIC III 786, RSC II 89, BMCRE IV 353, Hunter II 18, SRCV II 5492, Choice EF, well centered and struck, edge cracks, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing half left, right breast bare, Victory in right hand, left hand on grounded shield; $220.00 (€195.80)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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A caduceus is a wand entwined at one end by two serpents, each of whose bodies folds again in the form of two half-circles, whilst the head passes above the wand. It was an attribute peculiar to Mercury. Prudence is generally supposed to be represented by these two serpents, and the wings which are sometimes added to the Caduceus, are the symbols of diligence, both needful qualities in the pursuit of trade and commerce, which Mercury patronized. It was also the symbol of peace and concord, which that deity is related to have received from Apollo in return for the lyre.
RS84672. Silver denarius, RIC III 136, RSC II 344, BMCRE IV 530, Hunter II 139, Strack III 166, SRCV II 4078, Choice VF, nice portrait, flow lines, edge cracks, porous, weight 3.163 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 145 - 161 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse COS IIII, clasped hands holding stalks of grain and caduceus; $140.00 (€124.60)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Annona was the goddess of harvest and her main attribute is grain. This reverse suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces (especially from Africa) and its distribution to the people. By the Code De Naviculariis, the mariners appointed to carry grain from Egypt could be executed if they did not keep the proper course; and if they did not sail in the proper season, the master of the vessel would be banished.
RB65293. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 981, BMCRE IV 2038, SRCV II 4254, Cohen II -, F, nice portrait, uneven strike, reverse slightly off center, weight 21.364 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 157 - 158 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XXI COS IIII, Annona standing slightly slightly left, stalks of grain pointed downward in her right over modius overflowing with stalks of grain at feet on left, rudder vertical behind in left resting on prow of galley right, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; $125.00 (€111.25)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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In 122, Hadrian gave up the conquered territories in Scotland. During a personal visit to the area, Hadrian ordered construction of a 73 mile (117-kilometer) long wall to mark the northern border and keep the Caledonians, Picts and other tribes at bay. Construction of Hadrian's Wall began on 13 September.
RS79872. Silver denarius, RSC II 1131, RIC II 101(a), BMCRE III 212, SRCV II -, F, light corrosion, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 125 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head right, bare shoulder from behind; reverse P M TR P COS III, Victory flying right, holding trophy transverse in both hands; $55.00 (€48.95)











Catalog current as of Tuesday, June 27, 2017.
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Adoptive Emperors