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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Twelve Caesars ▸ NeroView Options:  |  |  | 

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

Nero became emperor after his stepfather, the emperor Claudius, died (Claudius was probably poisoned by Nero's mother Agrippina II). At first Nero ruled well, guided by his mentors Seneca and Burrus, but soon his reign degenerated into the debauchery and murder for which he is infamous. He had his mother, Burrus, Britannicus, and numerous senators and members of the nobility murdered or executed. Legend says he kicked Poppaea, his pregnant wife, to death. He was the first emperor to persecute Christians, blaming them for the Great Fire in 64 A.D. Nero committed suicide in 68 A.D after generals in Africa, Gaul and Spain all rebelled, and the Praetorian Guard in Rome deserted him.


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Thyatira, Lydia

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Thyateira (also Thyatira) is the ancient name of the modern Turkish city of Akhisar ("white castle"). In Revelation, Thyatira is the church that had a false prophetess (Revelation 2:20).
RP77045. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2382; BMC Lydia p. 302, 62; SNG Cop 597; Lindgren-Kovaks 834; SNGvA -, VF, nice green patina, reverse slightly off center, closed flan crack, weight 2.736 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Thyatira mint, c. 55 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN KΛAY∆I-OC KAICAP CEBA (from upper right, N not struck), bare-headed, draped bust of Nero right, wearing light beard (indicating mourning, for the death of Claudius); reverse labrys (double-axe), ΘYAT−EIPH/NΩ−N in two two lines across field divided by axe handle; $400.00 (€352.00)
 


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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RS76959. Silver denarius, RIC I 64 (R3), RSC II 121, Mac Dowall WCN 62, BnF III 233, BMCRE I - (p. 210, note), Nice F, well centered on a tight flan, light toning, porous, some light marks, weight 3.278 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 66 - 67 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse IVPPITER CVSTOS (Jupiter the Preserver), Jupiter seated left, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, thunderbolt in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; scarce; $220.00 (€193.60)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Hypaipa, Lydia

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Hypaepa, Lydia was on the route between Sardis and Ephesus, 42 miles from Ephesus, near the north bank of the Cayster River. The ruins are close to the present-day village of Gunluce, Turkey, 4 km NW of Odemis. According to myth the women of Hypaepa received the gift of a form of dance from Aphrodite; Hypaepa was the home of Arachne before she became a spider. The Persian goddess Anahita, later called Artemis Anaitis, was worshipped as at Hypaepa. An inscription from the synagogue of Sardis indicates a Jewish community in Hypaepa. In 88 B.C., Hypaepa rebelled against Mithridates VI of Pontus and was severely punished. Under Tiberius it was a candidate to receive a temple dedicated to worship of the emperor, but was rejected as too insignificant. To judge by the number of Byzantine churches that it contained, Hypaepa flourished under the Byzantine Empire.
RP76724. Leaded bronze AE 18, SNGvA 2961, RPC I 2550 (= vA coin, only one specimen cited), SNG Cop -, SNG München -, BMC Lydia -, VF, tight flan, porous, weight 5.033 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Hypaipa mint, Julios Hegesippos magistrate; obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP, laureate head right; reverse Dionysos standing left, kantharos in right hand, thrysos vertical behind in left hand, IOVA / HΓHCIΠΠ in two upward lines on left, VΠAIΠH / ΓP in two upward lines on right; very rare; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Ptolemy Soter wanted to integrate the Hellenistic and Egyptian religions by finding a deity that could win the reverence of both groups. The Greeks would not accept an animal-headed figure, so a Greek-style anthromorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.
RX76576. Billon tetradrachm, Kampmann-Ganschow 14.84, Geissen 170, Dattari 253, Milne 226, BMC Alexandria 157, RPC I 5281, aF, well centered, porous and rough, weight 10.595 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 64 - 28 Aug 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP, radiate head right; reverse AYTOKPA, draped bust of Serapis right, wearing kalathos, LIA (year 11) right; $125.00 (€110.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In ancient times, Alexandria was one of the world's most famous cities, known for its lighthouse (Pharos, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) and its library (the largest in the ancient world). Founded around 331 B.C. by Alexander the Great, it was Egypt's capital for nearly a thousand years, until the Muslim conquest of Egypt in 641 A.D.
RX76578. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 204, Geissen 172, Milne 238, Kampmann-Ganschow 14.88, BMC Alexandria 163, RPC I 5289, SRCV I 2004, Emmett 109, F, dark toning, edge spilt, small deposits, weight 12.403 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 65 - 28 Aug 66 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP AY, radiate bust right wearing aegis; reverse AYTOKPA, draped bust of Alexandria right wearing elephant-skin headdress, LIB (year 12) right; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In 64 A.D., according to Tacitus, The Great Fire of Rome burned for five and a half days. Only four of the fourteen districts of Rome escaped the fire; three were completely destroyed and another seven seriously damaged. Nero, blaming the Christians, ordered them thrown to dogs, crucified or burned to serve as lights.
RX76580. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 271; Milne 236; Curtis 97; BMC Alexandria p 20, 166; RPC I 5284; Geissen 167; Kampmann-Ganschow 14.83, aF, porous, some pitting, coppery area, weight 11.337 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 64 - 28 Aug 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP, radiate bust right wearing aegis; reverse AYTOKPA, eagle standing left, palm under wing, L IA (year 11) left, simpulum right; $75.00 (€66.00)
 


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The shield held by Victory is the golden shield that was dedicated to Augustus by the Senate and Roman People (S. P. Q. R.) in recognition of his classic, cardinal virtues. By placing the shield and Victory on his coin, Nero was claiming these same virtues were part of his regime. -- Roman History from Coins by Michael Grant
RB76309. Copper as, RIC I 313, BMCRE I 245, Hunter I 94, Cohen I 289, BnF I 399 var. (head right), SRCV I 1976 var. (same), gF, dark green patina, weight 12.004 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head left; reverse Victory alighting left, wings open, shield inscribed S P Q R in right, left hand at waist, S - C across field below center; $125.00 (€110.00) Out of Stock!


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 56 - 57 A.D.

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In 56 A.D., war began between Rome and Parthia after Vologases I invaded Armenia and replaced the Roman supported ruler with his brother Tiridates I.
RY73106. Bronze AE 18, McAlee 102; RPC I 4290; SNG Cop 101; BMC Galatia p. 160, 74, F, weight 5.068 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, reign of Nero, legate series, 56 - 57 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN, veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse EΠI KOYA∆PATOY, ram leaping right, looking back, star within crescent above, ET EP (year 105 of the Caesarean Era) below; $65.00 (€57.20)
 


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The shield held by Victory is the golden shield that was dedicated to Augustus by the Senate and Roman People (S. P. Q. R.) in recognition of his classic, cardinal virtues. By placing the shield and Victory on his coin, Nero was claiming these same virtues were part of his regime. -- Roman History from Coins by Michael Grant
SH76397. Copper as, RIC I 543, BMCRE I 381, BnF II 160, Mac Dowall WCN 593, Hunter I 131, Cohen I 302, SRCV I -, VF, nice portrait, well centered, some light corrosion, weight 10.627 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 66 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head right, globe at point of neck; reverse Victory flying left holding shield inscribed S P Q R, S - C across field; from the Jeff Michniak Collection; $300.00 (€264.00)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Hypaepa, Lydia

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Hypaepa was at the foot of Mt. Aipos, near the north bank of the Cayster River, 42 miles from Ephesus on the road to Sardis. The ruins are near the present-day village of Günlüce, 4 km northwest of of Ödemıs. In myth, Aphrodite gave the gifts of beauty and a form of dance to the women of Hypaepa, and it was Arachne's home before she was turned into a spider. The Persian goddess Anahita, later identified with Artemis and called Artemis Anaitis, was worshipped there. In 88 B.C., Hypaepa rebelled against Mithridates VI of Pontus and was severely punished. Under Tiberius it was a candidate for locating a temple dedicated to worship of the emperor, but was rejected as too insignificant. To judge by the number of churches, Hypaepa flourished under the Byzantine Empire.
RP72125. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2542 (11 spec.); SNG Cop 188; BMC Lydia p. 110, 16; SNGvA -, VF, a little off center but on a broad flan, weight 2.131 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 45o, Hypaepa (Günlüce, İzmir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Mitrodoros Kon, 55 A.D.(?); obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP (counter-clockwise from upper left), bare head of Nero right; reverse YΠAIΠHNΩN MHTPO∆ΩPOΣ, KON (counter-clockwise from upper left, KON upward in right field), hero standing left, labrys (double axe) in right; ex Gitbud & Naumann 2010; last example listed on Coin Archives sold in 2013; rare; $250.00 (€220.00)
 










OBVERSE LEGENDS

IMPNEROCAESARAVGPMAXTRPOTPP
IMPNEROCAESARAVGPMAXTRPPP
IMPNEROCAESARAVGPMTRPOTPP
IMPNEROCAESARAVGPONTMAXTRPOTPP
IMPNEROCAESARAVGPP
IMPNEROCAESARAVGVSTVS
NEROCAESAR
NEROCAESARAVGGERMIMP
NEROCAESARAVGIMP
NEROCAESARAVGVSTVS
NEROCAESAVGIMP
NEROCLAVCAEAVGGER
NEROCLAVDCAESARAVGGERMANI
NEROCLAVDCAESARAVGGERMPMTRPIMP
NEROCLAVDCAESARAVGGERPMTRPIMPPP
NEROCLAVDCAESARAVGGERMPMTRPIMPPP
NEROCLAVDCAESDRVSVSGERMPRINCIVVENT
NEROCLAVDDIVICLAVDFCAESARAVG
NEROCLAVDDIVICLAVDFCAESARAVGGERMANI
NEROCLAVDIVSCAESARAVGGERMA
NEROCLAVDIVSCAESARAVGGERMANIC
NEROCLAVDIVSCAESARAVGGERMPMTRPIMPPP
NEROCLDIVIFCAESAVGPMTRPII
NERONERONICLAVDIODRVSOGERMCOSDESIGN
NERONICLAVDIODRVSOGERMCOSDESIGN


REFERENCES

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Calicó, E. Xavier. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier à Vespasien (41-78 après J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, J-B. Bibliothèque National Catalogue Monnaies de L'Empire Romain II: De Tebère à Néron. (Paris, 1988).
King, C.E. Roman Quinarii from the Republic to Diocletian and the Tetrarchy. (Oxford, 2007).
Mac Dowall, D.W. The Western Coinages of Nero. ANSNNM 161. (New York, 1979).
Mattingly, H. and R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol 1: Augustus to Vitellius. (London, 1923).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, David R. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C.H.V. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Toynbee, J.M.C. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 10, 2016.
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Roman Coins of Nero