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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Twelve Caesars ▸ NeroView Options:  |  |  |   

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

Nero became emperor after his stepfather, the emperor Claudius, died (Claudius was probably poisoned by Nero's mother Agrippina II). At first, Nero ruled well, guided by his mentors Seneca and Burrus, but soon his reign degenerated into the debauchery and murder for which he is infamous. He had his mother, Burrus, Britannicus, and numerous senators and members of the nobility murdered or executed. Legend says he kicked Poppaea, his pregnant wife, to death. He was the first emperor to persecute Christians, blaming them for the Great Fire in 64 A.D. Nero committed suicide in 68 A.D after generals in Africa, Gaul, and Spain all rebelled, and the Praetorian Guard in Rome deserted him.

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Thyateira, Lydia

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Thyateira (also Thyatira) is the ancient name of the modern Turkish city of Akhisar ("white castle"). In Revelation, Thyatira is the church that had a false prophetess (Revelation 2:20).
RP86894. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2381; BMC Lydia p. 302, 58; SNG Cop 595; SNGvA 3216, aVF, green patina, earthen deposits, scratches, porosity, edge crack, weight 2.383 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Thyateira (Akhisar, Turkey) mint, as caesar, c. 51 - 54 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN KΛAY∆I KAICAP ΓEP, bare-headed, draped bust of young Nero right; reverse labrys (double-axe), ΘYAT-EIPH/NΩ-N across field in two lines divided by the axe handle; $100.00 (€85.00)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Sardes, Lydia

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Sardis was the capital of the Kingdom of Lydia, an important city of the Persian Empire, a Roman proconsul seat, and in later Roman and Byzantine times the metropolis of the province Lydia. In the Book of Revelation, Sardis, one of the Seven Churches of Asia, is admonished to be watchful and to strengthen since their works haven't been perfect before God. (Revelation 3:1-6).
RP86895. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 3002; BMC Lydia p. 253, 120; SNG Cop 523; SNGvA 3146, SNG Munchen -, VF, dark patina, earthen deposits, some porosity, slightly off center, weight 4.673 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, strategos Mindios, c. 59 - 62 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN KAICAP (square C), young laureate head right; reverse EΠI MIN∆IOY CAP∆IANΩN (square C), bust of young Herakles right, Nemean lion skin tied around neck; $110.00 (€93.50)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Anazarbus-Caesarea, Cilicia

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Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire, it was known as Caesarea. It was the Metropolis (capital) of Late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Eastern Roman emperor Justin I after an earthquake, it became Justinopolis in 525. In late 1097 or early 1098 it was captured by the armies of the First Crusade and was incorporated into Bohemond's Principality of Antioch. The old native name persisted, and when Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva. The Mamluk Kingdom of Egypt finally destroyed the city in 1374.
RP86907. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 4062 (2 spec.), BMC Lyconia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Levante -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -; countermark: Howgego 102 (Anazarbus), aF, dark green patina, encrustations, weight 5.514 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, 13 Oct 54 - 9 Jun 68 A.D.; obverse NWPΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; countermark on neck: head right in an oval punch; reverse ETOYC ςΠ KAICAPEΩN, river god (Pyramus) swimming right; none on Coin Archives; extremely rare; $80.00 (€68.00)

Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

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Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius. Antonius Felix was the procurator before whom St. Paul was brought for trial.
JD86532. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1348, Meshorer TJC 340, SGICV 5626, RPC I 4971, VF, highlighting earthen deposits, light corrosion, off center, weight 2.346 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two oblong shields and two spears crossed; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) flanking trunk; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $95.00 (€80.75)

Antioch, Seleukis & Pieria, Syria, c. 59 - 60 A.D.

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Shortly after Nero's accession in 54, the Roman vassal kingdom of Armenia overthrew their Iberian prince Rhadamistus and replaced him with the Parthian prince Tiridates. This was seen as a Parthian invasion. Nero immediately sent the army under the command of Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo. The Parthians temporarily relinquished Armenia, but peace did not last. Full-scale war broke out in 58 when the Parthians invaded Armenian. Corbulo repelled Tiridates, and Rome again controlled most of Armenia. Nero was acclaimed for this victory. Tigranes, a Cappadocian noble raised in Rome, was installed as the new ruler of Armenia. Corbulo was appointed governor of Syria as a reward.
RY86394. Bronze dichalkon, McAlee 107a/1 (same dies); SNG Fitzwilliam 5931; RPC I 4293 (no dot above lyre); SNG Cop 108 var. (same); BMC Galatia p. 161, 80 var. (same), gVF, green patina, a little porous, slightly off center, weight 3.796 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, civic issue, reign of Nero, c. 59 - 60 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Apollo right, hair rolled and bound with beaded taenia; reverse ANTIOXE ET HP (Antioch, year 108 [Caesarian era]), lyre, dot above; rare with dot above; $70.00 (€59.50)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In 62 A.D., Lucan wrote a history of the conflict between Julius Caesar and Pompey.
RX86146. Bronze obol, RPC I 5263; Dattari 278/279; Geissen 149; BMC Alexandria 179/180; Milne 207; Kampmann-Ganschow 14.67, F, old scratch on obverse, reverse rough, edge cracks, weight 5.661 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 61 - 62 A.D.; obverse NER KLAY KAI CEB GEP, laureate head right; reverse AYTO KPAT, Roma standing half left, patera in right hand, shield and spear in left hand, LH (year 8) lower left; rare; $180.00 (€153.00)

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The name Ostia was derived from the Latin "ostium" - river mouth. At the mouth of the River Tiber, Ostia was Rome's seaport. Construction of the port facilities began under Claudius and was likely completed just before this sestertius was struck in 64 A.D. Trajan and Hadrian expanded the facilities. The port was abandoned due to silting and now lies 3 km from the sea. The site is noted for the excellent preservation of its ancient buildings, magnificent frescoes and impressive mosaics.
SH86120. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 178, BMCRE I 131, Cohen I 37, Mac Dowall WCN 120, BnF I -, VF, well centered, nice portrait, near black patina, scratches on obverse lower right field, some porosity and tiny pitting, weight 26.031 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate bust right, wearing aegis; reverse AVGVSTI above, S - C divided by POR OST below, bird's-eye view Ostia harbor: pharos lighthouse with Neptune statue on top at far side center; crescent-shaped pier with building and figure sacrificing at far end, crescent-shaped row of breakwaters or slips on right with figure seated on rock at far end, 7 ships within port; river god Tiber reclining left holding rudder and dolphin below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 195 (7 Mar 2011), lot 405; $4680.00 (€3978.00)

Corpus Nummormum Romanorum, Vol. XVII, Nero, coins of gold, silver and bronze

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BK13370. Corpus Nummormum Romanorum, Vol. XVII, Nero, coins of gold, silver and bronze A. Banti & L. Simonetti, 1978, in Italian, 283 pages, 998 illustrations, hardcover, used, fair condition; $25.00 (€21.25)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In ancient times, Alexandria was one of the world's most famous cities, known for its lighthouse (Pharos, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) and its library (the largest in the ancient world). Founded around 331 B.C. by Alexander the Great, it was Egypt's capital for nearly a thousand years, until the Muslim conquest of Egypt in 641 A.D.
RP85906. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 204, Geissen 172, Milne 238, Kampmann-Ganschow 14.88, BMC Alexandria 163, RPC I 5289, SRCV I 2004, Emmett 109, VF, toned, flan flaw on each side, areas of corrosion, weight 11.750 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 65 - 28 Aug 66 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAY KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEP AY, radiate bust right wearing aegis; reverse AYTOKPA, draped bust of Alexandria right wearing elephant-skin headdress, LIB (year 12) right; $100.00 (€85.00)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Perge, Pamphylia

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Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Ruins of the main street in Perga
RP84161. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3373 (5 spec.), McClean 8902, BMC Lycia -, SNGvA -, aF, flan crack, rough, weight 4.647 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Perge mint, as caesar under Claudius, 50 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse NEPWN KAICAP, bare head right; reverse APTEMI∆OC ΠEPΓAIAC, Artemis running right, torch in left, bow in right; very rare; $80.00 (€68.00)





American Numismatic Society (ANS) Collections Database Online -
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, & P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Clay, C. "Münzprägung des Kaisers Nero" in Numismatische Zeitschrift 96 (1982), pp. 7 - 17.
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier à Vespasien (41-78 après J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, J-B. Bibliothèque National Catalogue Monnaies de L'Empire Romain II: De Tebère à Néron. (Paris, 1988).
King, C. Roman Quinarii from the Republic to Diocletian and the Tetrarchy. (Oxford, 2007).
Mac Dowall, D. The Western Coinages of Nero. ANSNNM 161. (New York, 1979).
Mac Dowall, D. "Two Roman Countermarks of A.D. 68" in NC 1960, pp. 103 - 112, pl. VII.
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 1: Augustus to Vitellius. (London, 1923).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, March 20, 2018.
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Roman Coins of Nero