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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Twelve CaesarsView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the 12 Caesars

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Perge, Pamphylia

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Perga was the capital of Pamphylia. Today it is a large site of ancient ruins, 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. During the Hellenistic period, Perga was one of the richest and most beautiful cities in the ancient world, famous for its temple of Artemis. It also is notable as the home of the renowned mathematician Apollonius of Perga.Ruins of the main street in Perga

RP84161. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3373 (5 spec.), McClean 8902, BMC Lycia -, SNGvA -, aF, flan crack, rough, weight 4.647 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Perge mint, as caesar under Claudius, 50 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse NEPWN KAICAP, bare head right; reverse APTEMI∆OC ΠEPΓAIAC, Artemis running right, torch in left, bow in right; very rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Ceres a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships, was listed among the Di Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.
RS70258. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 976; RSC II 30; BMCRE II Vespasian 323; BnF III 285; SRCV I 2636, F, centered, toned, weight 3.372 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right; reverse CERES AVGVST, Ceres standing slightly left, head left, stalks of grain in right hand, torch in left hand; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Minerva, equated with the Greek Athena, was the Roman virgin warrior goddess of poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic, and the inventor of music. She was worshiped on the Capitoline Hill as one of the Capitoline Triad along with Jupiter and Juno.
RS70322. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 58; RSC II 560; BMCRE II 11; BnF III 28; Hunter I 2; SRCV I -, Choice VF, excellent portrait, toned, weight 3.400 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, c. Oct - 31 Dec 81 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, Minerva standing right, helmeted and draped, brandishing spear in right hand, round shield on left arm; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In the Roman Republic, and Empire, the curule chair (sella curulis, supposedly from currus, "chariot") was the seat upon which magistrates holding imperium were entitled to sit. This includes dictators, magistri equitum, consuls, praetors, censors, curule aediles, and the promagistrates, temporary or de facto holders of such offices. Additionally, the Flamen of Jupiter (Flamen Dialis) was also allowed to sit on a curule seat, though this position did not hold imperium. Livy writes that the three flamines maiores or high priests of the Archaic Triad of major gods were each granted the honor of the curule chair.
SH70290. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 6 (R); RSC II 541a; BMCRE II p. 8, 46; BnF III -; Hunter I -; SRCV I -, F, toned, tight flan, flan crack, weight 3.296 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1st issue, 21 Dec 69 - early 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TITVS ET DOMITIAN CAESARES PRIN IV, Titus and Domitian seated left, side by side on curule chairs, each holding a laurel branch in extended right hand; rare; $175.00 SALE PRICE $158.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

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Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and sponsor of arts, trade, and strategy. She was born with weapons from the head of Jupiter. After impregnating the Titaness Metis, Jupiter recalled a prophecy that his own child would overthrow him. Fearing their child would rule the Heavens in his place, Jupiter swallowed Metis whole. The Titaness forged weapons and armor for her child while within the father-god, and the constant pounding and ringing gave him a headache. To relieve the pain, Vulcan used a hammer to split Jupiter's head and, from the cleft, Minerva emerged, whole, adult, and bearing her mother's weapons and armor. From the 2nd century B.C., the Romans equated her with the Greek goddess Athena. She was the virgin goddess of music, poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, and magic. She is often depicted with her sacred creature, an owl, which symbolised her association with wisdom and knowledge.
RS70318. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 789; RSC II 291; BMCRE II p. 233, 234; BnF III 208; Hunter III 93; SRCV I -, Choice aVF, nice portrait, toned, toned, weight 3.242 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 14 Sep 95 - 13 Sep 96 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, laureate head right; reverse IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Minerva standing left, helmeted and draped, thunderbolt in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield at feet behind; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In 75 A.D., the Temple of Peace was built in Rome to celebrate the conquest of Jerusalem in 70 and house the Menorah and other sacred objects from Herod's Temple. A representation of the menorah is depicted in a frieze on the Arch of Titus. According to the Torah, the menorah was hammered from pure gold following the design God revealed to Moses. The menorah was looted by the Vandals in the sacking of Rome in 455, and taken to their capital, Carthage. According to Procopius, the Byzantine General Belisarius recovered it when he defeated the Vandals in 533 and it was carried through the streets of Constantinople during his triumph. Procopius adds that it was later sent back to Jerusalem, after which there is no further record of it. The menorah might have been destroyed when the Persians pillaged Jerusalem in 614.
RS70278. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 772; RSC II 366; BMCRE II 161; BnF III 139; Hunter I 51; SRCV I 2301, aVF, nice portrait, centered, toned, weight 3.347 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 75 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG (counterclockwise), laureate head right; reverse PON MAX TR P COS VI (high priest, tribune of the people, consul for the 6th time), Pax seated left, extending olive branch in right hand, left hand at side; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS70281. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 356; RSC II 45; BMCRE II 64; BnF III 49; Hunter I 27; SRCV I 2282, aVF, nice portrait, rosy toning, centered on a tight flan, weight 3.399 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 72 - early 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse implements of the augurate and pontificate: simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), ewer (jug) and lituus (augural wand), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS70284. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 50; RSC II 574; BMCRE II 71; BnF III 55; SRCV I 2316, Choice VF, excellent portrait and centering, reverse struck a little flat, toned, weight 3.404 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 72 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse Vesta standing left, simpulum in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, VES-TA across field; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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In 76 A.D., Governor of Britannia Sextus Julius Frontinus subdued the Silures and other hostile tribes of Wales, established a fortress at Caerleon or Isca Augusta for Legio II Augusta and made a network of smaller forts for his auxiliary forces.
SH70285. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 847; BMCRE II 180; BnF III 156; RSC II 121; Hunter I 57; SRCV I 2287, aVF, superb portrait, toned, well centered, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.500 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 76 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS VII, eagle standing facing, head left, on low garlanded cippus; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS70291. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 21; RSC II 94a; BMCRE II 17; BnF III 10; SRCV I 2284, VF, excellent portrait, toned, well centered on a tight flan, small edge cracks, weight 3.231 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT, Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, scepter transverse in left; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00











Catalog current as of Sunday, February 26, 2017.
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12 Caesars