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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Twelve CaesarsView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the 12 Caesars

Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
RS86457. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 356; RSC II 45; BMCRE II 64; BnF III 49; Hunter I 27; SRCV I 2282, F, nice portrait, attractive toning, tight flan, scratches, small edge cracks, weight 3.424 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 72 - early 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse implements of the augurate and pontificate: simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), ewer (jug) and lituus (augural wand), AVGVR above, TRI POT below; $80.00 (€68.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RS86458. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 46; RSC II 561; BMCRE II 57; BnF III 39; SRCV I 2312, VF, superb portrait, nice light toning, well centered on a tight flan, light marks and scratches, minor flan flaws on reverse, edge crack, weight 3.469 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 70 - 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse Vesta seated left and draped seat without back, veiled and draped, simpulum in right hand, left hand at side, TRI - POT flanking across field; ex CNG auction 360 (30 Sep 2015), lot 405; $140.00 (€119.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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This coin may have been struck to appeal to Pax to deliver peace at the time the First Jewish Revolt was coming to its end. On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS86459. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 29; RSC II 94h; BMCRE II 26; BnF III 17; Hunter I 14; SRCV I 2285, VF, nice portrait, toned, centered on a tight flan, highest points struck a bit flat, edge cracks, weight 3.431 g, maximum diameter 185 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT (consul again, holder of tribunitian power), Pax seated left on chair without back, olive branch in right hand, winged caduceus in left hand; ex Harlan J. Berk; $160.00 (€136.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Vespasian is depicted on the reverse in his role as Pontifex Maximus, the high priest of Rome, the president of the college of pontiffs, and responsible for overseeing the religion and sacred ceremonies of the Romans. On 17 December 384, after the Christian emperor Gratian refused the title, Pope Siricius took the title Pontifex Maximus.
RS86450. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 546; RSC II 387; BMCRE II 98; BnF III 86; Hunter I 42; SRCV I 2305, VF, attractive tone, centered on a tight flan, struck with a damaged obverse die, lamination defects on obverse, edge cracks, weight 2.918 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG CENS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Vespasian seated right on seat without back, feet on footstool, long scepter vertical behind in right, olive branch in left; ex CNG auction 292 (5 Dec 2012), lot 370; $140.00 (€119.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS86452. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 21; RSC II 94a; BMCRE II 17; BnF III 10; Hunter I 8; SRCV I 2284, VF, excellent portrait, attractive iridescent toning, light corrosion, edge cracks, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT (consul again, holder of tribunitian power), Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, transverse rod in left; from the Lucas Harsh Collection; $100.00 (€85.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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The portrait resembles Vitellius. The mint had not yet received a Vespasian portrait and the die engraver modified Vitellius' portrait based on a verbal description.

Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." This coin was struck to ask Fortuna to ensure Vespasian returned safely to Roma from the war in Judaea.
RS86453. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 19; RSC II 84; BMCRE II 7; BnF III 7; Cohen I 84 (2f.); Hunter I 5; SRCV I -, VF, nice portrait, well centered on a tight flan, toned, light deposits, reverse a little flat, light marks, weight 3.251 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Jun (or later?) 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER FORT RED (consul again, [dedicated to] Fortune that safely brings back the Emperor), Fortuna Redux standing left, resting right hand on prow at feet on left, cornucopia in left hand; ex Gemini auction X (13 Jan 2013), part of lot 802; ex Harry N. Sneh Collection; $130.00 (€110.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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This coin may have been struck to appeal to Pax to deliver peace at the time the First Jewish Revolt was coming to its end. On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
RS86454. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 27 (C); RSC II 94g; BMCRE II 21; BnF III 15; Hunter I 15; SRCV I -, Choice F, well centered on a broad flan, toned, light marks, weight 3.198 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - Jun (and later?) 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT (consul again, holder of tribunitian power), Pax standing half left, olive branch extended in right hand, caduceus in left hand; from the Lucas Harsh Collection (purchased 2011); scarce; $140.00 (€119.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Mars was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS86455. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 23; RSC II 87; BMCRE II 11; BnF III 12; Hunter I 11; SRCV I -, F, toned, banker's mark, tight thick flan, weight 4.327 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Jun(?) 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS ITER TR POT (consul again, holder of tribunitian power), Mars advancing right, helmeted, cloak tied in belt at waist, transverse spear in right hand, legionary eagle (aquila) over left shoulder in left hand; ex Imperial Coins and Artifacts; $90.00 (€76.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

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Vesta was the Roman goddess of the hearth (home) and, derived from that, was important for the security of the state (homeland). Vespasian may have been especially devoted to Vesta because he was brought up by his grandmother in home that he loved and appreciated. Suetonius wrote, "He was brought up under the care of his paternal grandmother Tertulla on her estates at Cosa. Therefore, even after he became emperor he used constantly to visit the home of his infancy, where the manor house was kept in its original condition, since he did not wish to miss anything which he was wont to see there; and he was so devoted to his grandmother's memory that on religious and festival days he always drank from a little silver cup that had belonged to her." With his coinage dedicated to Vesta, Vespasian expressed his respect for home and hearth, and his dedication to security of the state.
RS86456. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 50; RSC II 574; BMCRE II 71; BnF III 55; Hunter I 29; SRCV I 2316, VF, nice portrait, toned, some obverse legend letters unstruck due to filled die, edge crack, weight 3.399 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 72 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse Vesta standing left, simpulum in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, VES-TA across field; ex Amphora Coins (David Hendin); $145.00 (€123.25)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

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"Judaea Capta" issue. The reverse depicts Vespasian riding in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. The Jewish historian Josephus was present at the festivities and noted, "It is impossible to do justice in the description of the number of things to be seen and to the magnificence of everything that met the eye...The greatest amazement was caused by the floats. Their size gave grounds for alarm about their stability, for many were three or four stories high..On one float the army could be seen pouring inside the walls, on another was a palace running with blood. Others showed defenseless men raising their hands in entreaty, firebrands being hurled at temples or buildings falling on their owners. On yet others were depicted rivers, which, after the destruction and desolation, flowed no longer through tilled fields providing water for men and cattle, but through a land on fire from end to end. It was to such miseries that the Jews doomed themselves by the war..Standing on his individual float was the commander of each of the captured cities showing the way he had been taken prisoner...Spoil in abundance was carried past. None of it compared with that taken from the Temple in Jerusalem...The procession was completed by Vespasian, and, behind him, Titus."
RS86443. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1559; RPC II 1931; RSC II 643; BMCRE II 512; BnF III 320; Hendin 1491; SRCV I 2279, VF, toned, bumps and marks, tight flan, areas of light corrosion, coppery areas, reverse a little off center, edge cracks, weight 3.170 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Vespasian driving triumphal quadriga right, branch and reins in right hand, scepter in left hand; $580.00 (€493.00)











Catalog current as of Thursday, December 14, 2017.
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12 Caesars