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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Twelve CaesarsView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Coins of the 12 Caesars

Kings of Bosporos, Cotys I with Claudius and Agrippina II, 45 - 69 A.D.

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According to Pliny the Elder, Agrippina was a beautiful and reputable woman. Many ancient historians, however, accuse Agrippina of poisoning Claudius and described her as ruthless, ambitious, violent, and domineering.
RP84697. Bronze 12 nummi, RPC I 1924, MacDonald 325 326, BMC Pontus 6, SNG Mun 3, SNG Cop -, Anokhin 152, 344 and pl. 13, aF, porous, weight 5.527 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Nikomedia(?) mint, c. 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse TI KΛAV∆IOY - KAICAPOC, laureate head of Claudius right, IB (mark of value) below; reverse IOYΛIAN AΓPIΠΠINAN KAICAPOC, head of Agrippina Junior left, hair falling down back of neck in a plait, BAK monogram before; rare; $120.00 (106.80)


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta her flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins.
RB85022. Copper as, RIC I 38, Cohen I 27, BMCRE I 46, SRCV I 1803, VF, green patina, some corrosion, light earthen encrustation, weight 11.020 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, bare head left; reverse VESTA, Vesta enthroned left, patera extended in right, long scepter transverse in left, S - C flanking across center; $380.00 (338.20)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP85311. Silver drachm, RPC II 1636 (6 spec.); Sydenham Cappadocia 96; Metcalf Conspectus p. 94, 7; BMC Galatia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aF, marks and scratches, weight 2.536 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 73 - 74 A.D.; obverse AYOKPA KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ETOYC EKTOY (year 6), Mount Argaeus surmounted by a statue of figure standing facing, radiate, globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; very rare; $95.00 (84.55)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Sagalassos, Pisidia

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Sagalassos, Pisidia, high in the western Taurus Mountains, was within the Roman province of Asia from 133 until 39 B.C., when Rome gave the region to the Galatian client king Amyntas. After he was killed in 25 B.C., the kingdom became the province of Galatia. Sagalassos became the "first city" of Pisidia and the center of the imperial cult. Sagalassos city was abandoned in the middle of the seventh century after it was destroyed by a plaque, Arab raids, and earthquakes. Survivors likely resettled in the valley below.
RP84970. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 3525 (7 spec.), SNG BnF 1751, SNGvA 5163, McClean 8998, BMC Lycia -, VF, attractive dark green patina, nice portrait, weight 9.487 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Sagalassos (near Aglasun, Turkey) mint, 63 - 9 Jun 68 A.D.; obverse NEPWN KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse CAΓAΛACCWN, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, himation around hips and legs and over left shoulder, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; extremely rare; $250.00 (222.50)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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The shield held by Victory is the golden shield that was dedicated to Augustus by the Senate and Roman People (S. P. Q. R.) in recognition of his classic, cardinal virtues. By placing the shield and Victory on his coin, Nero was claiming these same virtues were part of his regime. -- Roman History from Coins by Michael Grant
RB85336. Copper as, RIC I 543, BMCRE I 381, BnF II 160, Mac Dowall WCN 593, Hunter I 131, Cohen I 302, SRCV I -, F, bumps and marks, some corrosion, dark fields with bare copper devices, weight 10.186 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 66 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head right, globe at point of neck; reverse Victory flying left, shield inscribed S P Q R in right hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking high across field; $120.00 (106.80)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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The reverse legend translates, "The gates of Janus' temple are closed because peace (of the Roman people) is set on both land and sea." On the rare occasions when Rome was not at war the doors of the 'Twin Janus' were ceremonially closed, an event Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage of 65 - 67 A.D. -- David R. Sear, Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol 1
RB85338. Copper as, BnF II 400, RIC I 306, Mac Dowall WCN 288, BMCRE I 227, Cohen I 171, SRCV I 1974, VF, rough, pits on obverse, weight 10.822 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head right; reverse PACE P R VBIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, lateral view of the Temple of Janus with garland over closed doors within arch, temple front on the right, the left side of the temple side with windows to the left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking sides of temple; $165.00 (146.85)


Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, 55 - 95 A.D., Titus Portrait

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A Judaea Capta issue minted by a Jewish king! Agrippa was a devout Jew and a loyal vassal of Rome. It may seem strange he would commemorate the defeat of his people but he believed the Jews could flourish under Rome and sided with Rome during the rebellion. He ruled until at least 95 A.D. but in Syria, not Judaea.
JD85345. Bronze half unit, Hendin 1308, RPC II 2255, Meshorer TJC 143, F, rough near black mottled patina, weight 10.104 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP TITOC - KAICAP CEBAC, laureate bust of Titus right; reverse Nike advancing right, holding wreath in right hand, palm frond in left over shoulder, ET - HI (year 18) BA / AΓPI-ΠΠA (King Agrippa) in two divided lines across lower half of field; ex CNG auction 372, lot 342; $125.00 (111.25)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Aezanis, Phrygia

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A brockage occurs when a blank is struck with a previously struck coin which adhered to the opposite die. Click here to read a detailed explanation.
ME85351. Bronze AE 20, cf. RPC I 3098, VF, weight 6.622 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, Aezanis mint, obverse KΛAY∆IOΣ KAIΣAP, laureate head right; reverse incuse of obverse; $200.00 (178.00)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

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Strabo wrote, "The Romans possess Lugdunum, founded below a ridge at the confluence of the Arar and the Rhone. It is the most populous of all the other cities except Narbo; for it is a center of commerce, and the Roman emperors strike their silver and gold coinage there." (4.3.2)

RS85086. Silver denarius, RIC I 167a, BMCRE I 451, RSC I 137, BnF I 1373, Hunter I 197, SRCV I 1610, Choice near Mint State, well centered and struck, lustrous, very light rose-gold toning, some light marks and deposits, weight 3.606 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 15 - 13 B.C.; obverse AVGVSTVS DIVIF, bare head right, dot border; reverse bull butting right, left foreleg raised, lashing tail, IMPX in exergue, linear border; $2500.00 (2225.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP12057. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, F, encrusted, marks and scratches, small edge splits, weight 1.798 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm over left shoulder in left hand; $70.00 (62.30)











Catalog current as of Tuesday, June 27, 2017.
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12 Caesars